Over the last few years, gaming has become a mainstream passion and pastime that has embedded deeply into our culture. Most people first become fans of video games when they are younger. The chance to escape into a fantasy world, leaving reality behind, will always have a lasting appeal and impact on children. Twitter user kentarock1020 has a blind son, Hibiki, who is no different from any other young video game fan.

However, due to being blind, his son has struggled to find enough games that he can engage with. One of the few franchises Hibiki is able to fully enjoy is Rhythm Heaven (Rhythm Tengoku in Japan), and in thanks he sent a letter to Nintendo. The boy’s father took to Twitter to share the truly heartwarming exchange between his son and Nintendo.

“My son Hibiki is blind and has perfectly cleared every game in the Rhythm Tengoku series, the only games he can play. He sent Nintendo a letter and they actually responded! Them sending such a sincere correspondence to just one person is truly divine customer service. Nintendo, we’re anxiously awaiting the next installment in the series!”

Hibiki’s father was obviously touched by the amazing customer service which Nintendo provided. In the letter to Nintendo, Hibiki explained that he can only play Rhythm Tengoku because of his condition, and asked Nintendo to make more games in the series so that he has more games to play.

“Dear Nintendo,

“Hello. My name is Hibiki Sakai and I am in fifth grade. I am blind, but I’ve always wanted to play video games like everyone else. But there aren’t many games I can play at all. The one game I can really play is Rhythm Tengoku. It’s the only game I can enjoy together with others, and I never lose at it. I’ve gotten perfect scores on all the versions on the Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS, Wii, and 3DS too.

“So I really, really want you to make more Rhythm Tengoku games. And it’s perfectly fine if you make them a little harder too!

“I think that there are a lot of other kids with visual impairments who want to play video games but can’t. So I’d love for you to develop more games for people with handicaps to enjoy playing with others.

“I will always support you, Nintendo.

“From Hibiki Sakai”

Just like most children at a fifth grade age, Hibiki sees gaming as a huge part of his life. His sincere and heart-touching letter shows the importance of gaming to him and how much he loves Rhythm Tengoku. Nintendo replied to Hibiki with a very touching and personal letter. They even sent a copy written in brail so Hibiki could read it too.

“Thank you so much for sending us here at Nintendo your heartwarming letter.

“We are so happy to hear that you’ve perfected and enjoyed Rhythm Tengoku, Rhythm Tengoku Gold, Minna no Rhythm Tengoku, and Rhythm Tengoku The Best.

We have passed on your letter to Nintendo’s development department. We want to keep making games that everyone can have fun playing, so thank you for your support.”

Nintendo probably receives countless letters each day, so the company must have been really moved by Hibiki’s request. It’s fantastic to read that they plan to make more games which all people can access. Nintendo has a vast history of developing games which have become beloved childhood memories, and their statement that they want to “keep making games that everyone can have fun playing” perfectly encapsulates just why Nintendo is such an important company in so many children’s lives.

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  • Dreamwalker

    That sounds like a pretty generic response, to be honest…

    • DRAGI

      Same, I was expecting it to be signed by the CEO or something. Instead it didn’t seem to make it much farther than a regional office.

  • Connor Strickland

    While the response may sound somewhat generic, the fact remains that the company took time out of a normal day-to-day schedule and sent a letter back to the man and his son. They even went another step further by sending one in brail. It could have just gone to the wayside, but it didn’t.

    When any company does this, I feel that it shows compassion from the people that work within the walls. It lets us know they are people too and care to speak back. Not everything has to be signed by Miyamoto to mean something special…