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    The touchy subject of...roms
    • I get ROMs to test out a game on the VC (like a demo) before I buy it. Or if the game is old and I can't find it (PC or system). I've also gotten full games off line to see if they could 1) run on my PC 2) were worth buying. I decide in 24 hours if it's worth it or not. I've bought most of them I liked. If they made more game demos I'd just get those.

      So I played Fallout 1 on gametap before they became stupid and loved it. Then I got a rom of Fallout 2. 10 year old games and Black Isle is dead. I wouldn't be giving them money if I bought it off Ebay. However because of these 2 games I got Fallout 3. It may not have the same feel as the first 2, but it's still fun. I got a rom of CoD2 and loved it. been a CoD fan ever since (minus 3). I got a ROM of paper Mario 1 and loved it. Plan on getting it off VC. (it wasn't on VC when I ROMed it). I saw mario RPG and watched the video. it looked kinda lame. Remembered I had SNES ROMs and played it, loved it and is also on my list to buy. Until they make more demos for games so I can make sure they don't suck I'll keep ripping them off TPB to test them.
      [SIZE="2"]"You're right, Half-Life 1 is the God of FPSs. Half-Life: Opposing Force is the holy ghost of FPSs, (Seriously, the holy ghost is really ****ing awesome, but no one EVER talks about it.) and Half-Life 2 is Jesus. (He's pretty cool, and can walk on water and ****, but he can't blow up cities on command like God can, so he's not quite as cool, and yet EVERYONE THINKS HES THE BEST. WTF?)" ~8bit
      [/SIZE]

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Fluffy776 ().

    • I simply pirate all my games.

      Now, before you start shouting out that "I should buy to support the developers", I'll say "I would, if I could."

      1. Most games aren't available where I live.
      2. If they are available, they're bloody expensive (for a Trinidadian like me).

      Fancy paying TT$600 (roughly US$100) for a game released more than three years ago? I think not; especially if your monthly salary is TT$1000 and you don't get paid during the summer holidays.
    • Leonri wrote:

      Bethesda Softworks should be commended for it's policy of releasing old Elder Scrolls games to the public. Both Arena and Daggerfall are available free from their site. I wish more devs would continue this trend when games are no longer profiting them


      I give them more kudos for releasing construction sets so you can mod your games. Giving players a way to create their own original content to share with others is a good way to keep a game fresh and selling. I'm surprised that not many gaming companies do this.

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    • I see no problem with emulating things that are no longer in production (which is what 95% of all roms are). Nobody is making money off games that haven't been in production for 15 years, so nobody is being cheated.
      Of course, if we are talking about emulating current stuff like PSP games, that is a diffrent story.
      [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Wrath of Pong ().

    • Emulating new games is pretty bad, but the ROMs of old ones that are no longer sold (e.g. Secret of Mana, Chrono Trigger, etc.), in my eyes, are completely fine. Most of the ROMs I actually play (I have many but don't play all of them) are of games that I have once owned but have either lost, or they do not work anymore.
    • Insaney wrote:

      I simply pirate all my games.

      Now, before you start shouting out that "I should buy to support the developers", I'll say "I would, if I could."

      1. Most games aren't available where I live.
      2. If they are available, they're bloody expensive (for a Trinidadian like me).

      Fancy paying TT$600 (roughly US$100) for a game released more than three years ago? I think not; especially if your monthly salary is TT$1000 and you don't get paid during the summer holidays.


      You have my sympathy.
      Damn, that must suck...
      I'm not even going to bother complaining anymore about $50 games.

      Why is your salary so low?!
      (former) Technical administrator and developer for Zelda Universe and Zelda Wiki.
      Want to know more about ZW? Read up!
    • John wrote:

      I'm opposed to them, naturally. They deprive developers of money, which means that they have less to spend on making more games. It's basic logic, really. You pirate something, then the creator makes less of it, or the same amount at a lower quality.

      From my understanding, a majority of people who pirate games wouldn't have bought the game in the first place.
      Demons Run When A Good Man Goes To War - River Song
    • Koulatio wrote:

      How so? Theft isn't theft if you don't really like what your stealing? Either way, your stealing.


      The way I see it, it's the people making and selling mediocre video games that are the real criminals. I'm simply buying their product for what it's worth, which is nothing.
      "And the LORD was with Judah; and he drave out the inhabitants of the mountain; but could not drive out the inhabitants of the valley, because they had chariots of iron - Judges 1:19

    • can't say i know too much about ROMS but surely this is the same as illegally downloading music?
      in that case, my opinion would remain the same as it does concerning music download:
      video games are an art form (although perhaps not in the widely recognised sense that music is) so surely developers should see that at least their games are being appreciated, despite not being paid for? and that's a two-way street: if the fans enjoyed the album or in this case game, then surely they wouldn't mind purchasing it instead of or aswell as downloading it.
      and besides that, that illegal downloads are often used because whatever it is is difficult to source, and also - the gaming industry makes enough money as it is to make a *big* deal over teh ROMS: it surely doesn't suffer as much as the film or music industries.
      [SIZE="1"]

      [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
      [SIZE="1"]i'm dizzy generally.[/SIZE]
      Tumblr | Twitter | Last.fm
      [/SIZE]
    • 8bit wrote:

      Your definition of 'suffer' is a strange one considering piracy has essentially zero effect on the total sales of any industry.


      If you are faced with the option of downloading illegally or buying, you can either give them money or not. If enough people download, the record industry does not gain the money they could have made. And if they fail to at least meet the price of the record produced, they lose money and the artist is cut from the label. Same with games. If they fail to meet the price of the game produced, the game will not have a sequel or other related games. In some cases, the distribution company will also cut business deals with the game company. However, it has to be REALLY bad for that.

      But you're saying that piracy does not directly steal money from the company. This is true. You aren't taking money from them; you are preventing them from making money.
      (former) Technical administrator and developer for Zelda Universe and Zelda Wiki.
      Want to know more about ZW? Read up!
    • Neo wrote:

      If you are faced with the option of downloading illegally or buying, you can either give them money or not. If enough people download, the record industry does not gain the money they could have made. And if they fail to at least meet the price of the record produced, they lose money and the artist is cut from the label. Same with games. If they fail to meet the price of the game produced, the game will not have a sequel or other related games. In some cases, the distribution company will also cut business deals with the game company. However, it has to be REALLY bad for that.

      But you're saying that piracy does not directly steal money from the company. This is true. You aren't taking money from them; you are preventing them from making money.


      I'm not saying that, not only is it not stealing, it does not effect the overall sales of the industry.

      Yes, record labels represented by the RIAA will lose money- they are, however, not the entire industry. You see, everyone has a certain amount of income and a certain amount of that is considered 'disposable' (This varies from person to person) Thus, if someone uses their disposable income on a product that is not yours it is either because that product was better, or because your marketing sucked, and thus, one who pirates is very unlikely to have purchased the product if piracy wasn't available, as their disposable income is already reserved for a different, better product.

      While the RIAA likes to point to their drop in sales, what they fail to mention is that that drop is not representative of the entire industry, only labels which belong to the RIAA, and other industries, such as gaming, which are just as easy to pirate, are booming right now! Thus, piracy can't possibly be related, or the gaming industry would be doing terrible.
      Don't trust the police.
      No justice; no peace.
    • I don't think Piracy affects sales all that much.

      Heavily Pirated Sims 3 Generating Record-Breaking Legit Sales

      Does game downloading on P2P networks have a negative impact on sales?

      If so, you'd never prove it by looking at the case of The Sims 3. A late May report by Bloomberg indicated that The Sims 3 had been leaked and downloaded 180,000 times between May 18 to May 21. At that rate the not-yet-released PC game was on pace to eclipse Spore's record as most downloaded.

      Despite the piracy, the DRM-less Sims 3 is experiencing the best-selling PC launch in EA's long history of publishing games. Says who? EA. The publisher issued a press release yesterday trumpeting 1.4 million legit units sold during the game's first week of availability.

      At $50 a pop, that's $70 million in sales. In a week. And yet industry types like EA's own Peter Moore still maintain that piracy is killing the PC games market and use that mantra to justify saddling consumers with unwanted DRM or worse, not releasing PC versions of popular games


      Study: P2P effect on legal music sales "not statistically distinguishable from zero

      A new study in the Journal of Political Economy by Felix Oberholzer-Gee and Koleman Strumpf has found that illegal music downloads have had no noticeable effects on the sale of music, contrary to the claims of the recording industry.
      Demons Run When A Good Man Goes To War - River Song