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    Dungeon Styles for the Next Zelda Game: Which do you Prefer?
    • Zeldaisthebest! wrote:

      Hyrule caste in BOTW just fells like the type of dungeon that would be in older Zelda games. I liked that the divine beast had like moving parts of the dungeon around has I liked the dungeon in SS that did something like that but the divine beat in BOTW just felt to much alike. Having mostly the same sounding music, same brown color, no real enimies, being small was the problem.
      I never really thought about it, but Hyrule Castle did feel like a modern version of the original Zelda dungeons. No real puzzles, just killing enemies to progress.
      :moon:
      "A puppet that can no longer be used is mere garbage. This puppet's role has just ended..." -Majora

      "A puppy can be fused with garbage. This puppy's role has just ended."
      :moon:
    • BotW's Hyrule Castle is also special because it's an important location for the series as a whole, but it's also specifically important for BotW because of the build-up it gets, not just because Zelda and Ganon are there, but also because she communicates with you, and you can see it in the distance starting with an early point in the game. It's also one of the more difficult places and even has some interesting lore in the form of journals and memories tied to it, with one of them specifically taking place in the actual castle. Its theme song also helps.

      So I think it ticks plenty of boxes, but I kind of doubt that more dungeons like it would've reached the same level. Although I still think it'd be interesting to see such attempts.

      It's hard to choose as I also like the older type of dungeons, but I'd prefer it if they felt more like varied and believable locations with some explanations behind them, the item, and the boss. I think the Snowpeak Ruins and the Goron Mines from TP were on to something, just to name a few examples. The presence of the items are explained, you talk to NPCs, they're not places for worship (temples, which were common in the series), the items have explanations behind them, and the bosses are actual people gone mad.

      As for being able to approach a dungeon from many directions like BotW's Hyrule Castle, it's cool but I don't know if it's a necessity.

      The post was edited 4 times, last by ich Will ().

    • @Zero_Origin

      Oh I know I get that. I'm just saying BoTW's approach worked because of what the game it simply is.

      I doubt BoTW will set the standard for future games in terms of dungeon design, there were too many overall complaints about the system. I love Hyrule Castle, I think it's one of the best Zelda dungeons in the series, but for a different set of reasons that I think MM's Stone Tower is one of the best as well. While BoTW did have some good puzzles, it's dungeon design concept didn't allow for good puzzles to grow and evolve, something that is done very well in a more traditional approach. If Nintendo does decide to make another open world Zelda, which imo seems likely, they'll definitely want to rethink how they approach dungeons as long as they don't forget what made past dungeons so good.
      It's a shame to ruin such a beautiful morning by being awake

      -Bill Watterson
    • Honestly, an system of old-style dungeons could work in a game like BotW, you'd just have to make sure that the player could defeat the boss without any specific items. There could be plenty of puzzles/areas that were non-essential that required specific items, though. That would be fun because that would give you a reason to go back. I always lamented that in older Zelda games, that once you were done with a dungeon you essentially just had no reason to go back.
    • Skaalgard wrote:

      Honestly, an system of old-style dungeons could work in a game like BotW, you'd just have to make sure that the player could defeat the boss without any specific items. There could be plenty of puzzles/areas that were non-essential that required specific items, though. That would be fun because that would give you a reason to go back. I always lamented that in older Zelda games, that once you were done with a dungeon you essentially just had no reason to go back.
      I honestly never liked backtracking through dungeons. I feel like it is a waste of time, since I have already been there. That is why I've never gotten all the Gold Skulltalas in Ocarina of Time, there are some hidden in dungeons, that require items gotten at a later time.
      :moon:
      "A puppet that can no longer be used is mere garbage. This puppet's role has just ended..." -Majora

      "A puppy can be fused with garbage. This puppy's role has just ended."
      :moon:
    • I voted "Gauntlet" since Hyrule Castle was great and I'd love to see more dungeons like that.

      But my ideal Zelda would contain dungeons of embodying all of the above, which of course would be the most complex and challenging from a developmental perspective, but the most interesting from a game-play perspective.

      I think there is definitely a place for the "traditional" lock and key dungeons in an open world game. There is no reason you couldn't have a fairly linear dungeon in an otherwise non-linear game.

      Even in these dungeons, I'd like to see them implement some deeper design elements, such as: multiple entrances/exits, optional content, short-cuts/sequence breaking, incentive to return.

      The challenge, of course, is scaling the difficulty. I still like the general idea of a "difficulty curve," as it creates a sense of advancement and growth.

      There is a lot of opportunity for enhancing the replay value here.
    • pj777 wrote:

      I doubt BoTW will set the standard for future games in terms of dungeon design, there were too many overall complaints about the system. I love Hyrule Castle, I think it's one of the best Zelda dungeons in the series, but for a different set of reasons that I think MM's Stone Tower is one of the best as well. While BoTW did have some good puzzles, it's dungeon design concept didn't allow for good puzzles to grow and evolve, something that is done very well in a more traditional approach. If Nintendo does decide to make another open world Zelda, which imo seems likely, they'll definitely want to rethink how they approach dungeons as long as they don't forget what made past dungeons so good.

      This line of thought is essentially why I created this thread and poll. I doubt we will be seeing traditional dungeons return exactly as they were before because the devs seem to be all about rethinking Zelda's conventions these days. I also don't see the Divine Beasts becoming the formula for the future based off their reception. Hyrule Castle seems like a good template for future dungeons, but it was missing in the puzzle department.

      At this point I'm having a hard time imagining what kind of puzzles would fit the non-linear dungeon structure of Hyrule Castle. Many of the puzzles in traditional dungeons worked because the player was limited in where they could go at a given time through lock and key gameplay and linear structuring. These kinds of puzzles could easily be bypassed and therefore fall apart in a dungeon where there is more than one path and multiple points of entry or directions you can approach a room from.

      Does anyone have ideas on how to approach this problem?

      The post was edited 3 times, last by Zero_Origin ().

    • I'm actually of the minority in that I really prefer the Hyrule Castle style of dungeon. If the game had 8 of them all over the overworld, that'd be absolutely euphoric.

      The style meshes so well with BotW's mechanics, which I'm guessing will be carried over to the next game. However, I will say that I think a middle ground can be met so that elements of lock and key dungeons are integrated into these dungeons. A boss key you had to find, linear hallways with puzzles, maybe even items to find hidden somewhere within them. But I think the idea of making these dungeons freely explorable areas in their own right is a really good use of resources that maximizes replayability and enjoyment.
    • I enjoyed Hyrule Castle. Like I said above, it felt kind of like a Zelda 1 dungeon. I'd be more okay if the dungeons were replaced with Hyrule Castles than if they were replaced by Divine Beasts. I'd just like if they put more puzzles in it.
      :moon:
      "A puppet that can no longer be used is mere garbage. This puppet's role has just ended..." -Majora

      "A puppy can be fused with garbage. This puppy's role has just ended."
      :moon: