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    Moving
    • When I lived with my parents, I moved 3 separate times, from Providence to Nashville and then to Dallas. In Dallas we moved between 3 different houses. After one year in a dorm at college, I then moved into an apartment and I've been here for 4 years now. Now that I've graduated college I'm trying to go elsewhere and move somewhere different to explore. The problem is that, I'm not really sure where I want to go - Austin has been an amazing city and I really like it here, so it's a bit unfair. So far I've looked at cities like Los Angeles, Seattle, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Denver, and more. Really, I'll probably just move where I get my first job opportunity. How many times have each of you moved, and to where? What cities have been your favorites and what cities would you think about going to?
    • Imma start this suckah off strong.
      • Apartment - scary city in CT, it's all I could afford, I was young. My neighbor who shared a wall got arrested for selling heorine twice. Why it didn't stick the first time...
      • Condo - less scary area in CT, this one actually had woods in the back.
      • House (rented) - suburbs of MA; it was on a freaking lake, it was amazing. Lots of kayaking.
      • Condo - Boston; East side baby! Blue line! Go Pats! 5 minute ride into the heart of it.
      • Apartment - Denver; East side again (I guess my Biggie is showing). Asked to rent before even visiting, looked scarier than it was. When my boss dropped me off one day he said "you seriously live here?"
      • House - Colorado Suburb. My first purchase. signed a contract to sell it today. Man.
      • [Pending] House - Colorado mountains. Hopefully by Valentine's weekend I'll stop moving and focus on creating my life where I'll live out my days for a while.
      So obviously I'm an advocate of Colorado. New England is beautiful though, I was THIS close to moving to an area in PA or Rhode Island but we decided to be mountain people.

      I like that you're in a mode for considering options. I think if I still was I would explore Seattle, Maine, Tennessee Blue Mountains, New Hampshire.

      I have friends in California, and while I appreciate being able to visit if just for the crazy punch in the face of culture, it's not for me. I've heard nice things about Salt Lake and hope to do a road trip someday, stop at MOAB.
    • Kae wrote:

      Imma start this suckah off strong.
      • Apartment - scary city in CT, it's all I could afford, I was young. My neighbor who shared a wall got arrested for selling heorine twice. Why it didn't stick the first time...
      • Condo - less scary area in CT, this one actually had woods in the back.
      • House (rented) - suburbs of MA; it was on a freaking lake, it was amazing. Lots of kayaking.
      • Condo - Boston; East side baby! Blue line! Go Pats! 5 minute ride into the heart of it.
      • Apartment - Denver; East side again (I guess my Biggie is showing). Asked to rent before even visiting, looked scarier than it was. When my boss dropped me off one day he said "you seriously live here?"
      • House - Colorado Suburb. My first purchase. signed a contract to sell it today. Man.
      • [Pending] House - Colorado mountains. Hopefully by Valentine's weekend I'll stop moving and focus on creating my life where I'll live out my days for a while.
      So obviously I'm an advocate of Colorado. New England is beautiful though, I was THIS close to moving to an area in PA or Rhode Island but we decided to be mountain people.

      I like that you're in a mode for considering options. I think if I still was I would explore Seattle, Maine, Tennessee Blue Mountains, New Hampshire.

      I have friends in California, and while I appreciate being able to visit if just for the crazy punch in the face of culture, it's not for me. I've heard nice things about Salt Lake and hope to do a road trip someday, stop at MOAB.
      Man, I can't even imagine buying a house, much less selling one. I've been to Colorado a bunch of times and really like it there - but for me that's also a bit of a negative since I kinda want to go somewhere really different, even if I don't like it as much. Seattle is probably my current favorite. California seems interesting since I've lived mostly in Texas and I think that would be a fun "punch in the face of culture" as you said hahaha.
    • i've lived in Kitchener, Ontario the whole time but moved a little
      • grew up in a semi in the southeast suburbs.
      • in 2000 when i was about 6 we moved one street over. i miss this place so much and even my dreams still default back to it.
      • in 2013 we moved and downsized to an older place on the edge of downtown. did not like it
      • in 2017 we moved back to the neighbourhood just a slight north of the one i spent 19 years in. was a really nice house that made use of its space much better than the previous shack
      • this past summer my older sister bought a condo on the developing west side and i moved in with her. i pay rent and all that. it's a pretty new place but still needs some fixing up.
      ideally i'd just buy my sister's place off her in some years if i'm still alive.
    • A long time ago, I moved a few towns over to stay with my cousin and "just live my life". Well, that life consisted of cutting trees and making sandwiches all day, and... it just wasn't for me.

      I learned a long time ago that home is home, and I already had one. Sure, bills are a ##### and this place has caused me a lot of trouble, but everytime I'm away from it, I just want to go home.

      Not saying that moving was just a flat out horrible experience. I loved it at first! New pad, new job, new environment... but... after a while, I just wanted to go back home lol

      I doubt I'll ever move again, so long as I can stay where I am. Best wishes to all ZUer's who are venturing out into the world: I hope you find a place to call home!!
    • Guinea wrote:

      A long time ago, I moved a few towns over to stay with my cousin and "just live my life". Well, that life consisted of cutting trees and making sandwiches all day, and... it just wasn't for me.

      I learned a long time ago that home is home, and I already had one. Sure, bills are a ##### and this place has caused me a lot of trouble, but everytime I'm away from it, I just want to go home.

      Not saying that moving was just a flat out horrible experience. I loved it at first! New pad, new job, new environment... but... after a while, I just wanted to go back home lol

      I doubt I'll ever move again, so long as I can stay where I am. Best wishes to all ZUer's who are venturing out into the world: I hope you find a place to call home!!
      What motivated the initial move? And how does one get a gig cutting trees and making sandwiches?
    • I’ve lived in Western New York my entire life, all within a couple hours of my childhood home. I lived in small cities surrounded by rural areas, and the rent was cheap since it’s hardly booming. I hated living in Jamestown, which is by the Pa. border - there was a lot of crime and while there was things to do, it was definitely an economically depressed area.

      Where I live now is between Buffalo and Rochester, two major cities in WNY. So it’s easy to get to two major hubs and the city itself is very small and easy to walk around in. It’s also relatively safe, and since we are surrounded by farmland there is constant farmers markets so it’s very easy to get fresh produce and meat.

      The biggest thing here I despise is snow and cold. If you aren’t used to driving in it, when we get hammered due to our close proximity to the lake it can be scary to drive in if you get out before the plows. If I ever had to leave NY I would want to go somewhere where the state is liberal like NY but warmer. I’d like to avoid tornado and hurricane prone areas, and a low crime small city.

      :heart: Rinn “Arwyn” Nailo drawn by Liah :heart:
      Rakshael: if I know one thing about Ruki, it's that she'll prove you wrong just for the sake of saying she did it
      Characters | The Time Lost | The Rumors We Believe | Ruki's Reviews
    • Hmm well it seems like you have a lot of options, and you are interested in living in a lot of high cost of living areas. So, did you go to school for something where you'll make over $100k at your first job? If not scratch San Francisco off your list. And even if you do end up making between 100-200k at your first job you'll end up living in Oakland and not actually SF and besides the amazing sandwich shops it's just not the same.

      Generally you probably will just move wherever the job market takes you, but with that in mind think about the type and quality of life you want. Do you like driving without traffic? Do you mind taking public transit? Do you hate HAVING to drive in a busy area where there is no public transit? If so take LA off your list. Just think about the type of life you want and the areas that will suit that lifestyle, and focus on applying to those places.

      For me, as much as I love to travel, I've mostly only LIVED in two states, New York and Virginia. Upstate New York is great, and like Ruki I love it for the same reasons, but also dislike the cold. By that I mean, I love REGULAR cold, anything 20F and above is fine. But Upstate gets bone chilling cold for months, and it's miserable, and that's why we invented Buffalo wings. Virginia is fantastic but also has a high cost of living just about everywhere you go in the state. I've also technically lived in Chicago (high crime rate, don't move there), Kansas City (AMAZING, loved it, very artsy with a great music and restaurant scene), and Houston (the traffic is worse than DC with no metro). And Poland, highly recommend, good food, good people, good beer.

      Good luck to you, hopefully you keep us posted on where you end up! And if you prove me wrong and find a great apartment in SF for less then $3,000/month, I'd be even happier for you :)
    • While I was born in California, I have no memory of living anywhere else besides Utah.

      There are three places that I have lived in ol' mormonville.
      -Vernal, my hometown. I moved there when I was 2 and lived there for about 16 years, it's a pretty quiet town and not much ever goes on but it was nice. It had two fairly sized lakes about a 15 minute drive out and a large forest an hour or so to the north. Besides that we were surrounded by sagebrush and dirt for miles on end. The town's economy is heavily dictated by how well oil drilling was doing. If drilling was doing great, every business boomed and prospered, but the second it went downhill, it went downhill fast. People would start losing their jobs, several would jump ship to move away and businesses would sometimes kick the bucket. We had a building that seemed to go through a new owner every other year, starting out with a pizza place, then becoming mexican food, then a sandwich shop, then a donut shop, then finally back to mexican food last I saw. The town has gone through some rapid expansion over the last few years, adding more chain businesses and such, it's crazy to think about how there used to be just nothing but dirt where all the new stuff is now, haha. If you don't like going on a boat on one of the lakes or hunting up in the forest, your other real option for entertainment was the movie theater or the rec center. For all the shit I give it though, I enjoyed living there. It's a quiet, safe town where if you don't get out while you're young, you'll probably never leave (mostly because our school didn't ever focus on college prep whatsoever and actively killed the few programs that did, haha).

      -Salt Lake City, the big one. I went to college at the University of Utah for about a year and I enjoyed every moment of it, well besides the moment where my bike was stolen but that's another story, haha. The city probably isn't that crazy compared to other larger ones from other states, only a few buildings comparatively that you could even call skyscrapers and that would be a bit of a stretch (what would be a better word to use than skyscraper? cloudtickler? yeah let's go with cloudtickler). There are at least two malls inside the city itself, both with a little spin on the typical "bunch of businesses in one building" thing. One being the Gateway, a strip of road with businesses all around the sides and at the end a center for events like bands to play and such, not in a big building. The other mall is City Creek, with two buildings on opposite sides of a road, a walkway above the road connecting them and a small flowing creek running through the center of both. I didn't have a job while I lived here, so I can't really say how my experience with that went. I did go to a Zelda symphony there and it was just incredible, however that was an outlier event for Utah as we typically don't get much like that and some events that go across the entire country just completely circle around and avoid the state entirely. This is easily the place I lived where I have the least experience with, so I can't say as much about positives and negatives as I would like.

      -Logan, my favorite. Logan is probably the biggest city you'll hit on your way from Utah to Idaho, as we are right on the border. It's a college town, with USU being a big draw for it and the students bringing a big bonus to the economy. It's essentially a larger version of Vernal, but it has so much more to do that I personally enjoy. We still have things like hiking and boating and hunting here, but there are mountains nearby for snow sports, an actual bowling alley, several movie theaters and soooo many different places to eat (my personal favorite is The Beehive, it's delicious). We have a small mall too and inside it is a VR gaming place and like one of the most hodgepodge mix of games from every generation of console/pc, comic books, manga, cds, vhs, dvds, books, gaming consoles and gaming peripherals. It's a mess but it's great. I go to Smash Bros tournaments almost every week here and I have had a blast getting to know members of the community. Logan is only about an hour drive away from Salt Lake too, so if any event that does catch my interest occurs, I can go to it and drive back home the same night. Not much for crime has ever occurred to anyone I have known here so I feel incredibly safe. It's not an enormous city, it's like the middle ground between Vernal and SLC, but I enjoy it.

      Weather across the north part of Utah is pretty erratic. Sometimes it will be sunny, then rain, then snow, all within the same day. We have pretty cold winters and pretty hot summers, so the best time of the year tends to be late spring or early fall in my opinion. We typically get a large amount of snow or ice and with how mountainous it is in some parts of Utah, it can be pretty scary driving in the winter if you don't have the right tires and aren't prepared to drive really slow.

      As for the elephant in the room, I personally haven't practiced the mormon faith while living here, so I don't think I can speak of it in great detail accurately, but I will give some experience I've had with people who do. Every Sunday without fail a parent would drive some kids around door to door to ask for money for the church. I personally hated it, not for the fact that they were asking for money, but that they were getting the kids to do it for them. Seeing the adult sitting in the car during snow or rain as the kids would walk up and ask for money just rubbed me the wrong way. Besides that, I was invited a few times to do some scout-like activities. Every time we got together at the church we would do some kind of little crafts project or clean up around the building. After about two months of doing this, the people who were running it asked my dad if they could use our boat to go on the lake. When my dad said he wouldn't be comfortable with letting them use it while he wasn't there, they never contacted us again regarding anything to do with activities. I haven't personally experienced some of the more negative interactions I've heard about from others, but that might just be luck on my end, idk.

      But yeah, overall I enjoy living in Utah. Would I ever move? Only if I knew I had some friends where I was going, haha.
    • Winnie wrote:

      Hmm well it seems like you have a lot of options, and you are interested in living in a lot of high cost of living areas. So, did you go to school for something where you'll make over $100k at your first job? If not scratch San Francisco off your list. And even if you do end up making between 100-200k at your first job you'll end up living in Oakland and not actually SF and besides the amazing sandwich shops it's just not the same.

      Generally you probably will just move wherever the job market takes you, but with that in mind think about the type and quality of life you want. Do you like driving without traffic? Do you mind taking public transit? Do you hate HAVING to drive in a busy area where there is no public transit? If so take LA off your list. Just think about the type of life you want and the areas that will suit that lifestyle, and focus on applying to those places.

      For me, as much as I love to travel, I've mostly only LIVED in two states, New York and Virginia. Upstate New York is great, and like Ruki I love it for the same reasons, but also dislike the cold. By that I mean, I love REGULAR cold, anything 20F and above is fine. But Upstate gets bone chilling cold for months, and it's miserable, and that's why we invented Buffalo wings. Virginia is fantastic but also has a high cost of living just about everywhere you go in the state. I've also technically lived in Chicago (high crime rate, don't move there), Kansas City (AMAZING, loved it, very artsy with a great music and restaurant scene), and Houston (the traffic is worse than DC with no metro). And Poland, highly recommend, good food, good people, good beer.

      Good luck to you, hopefully you keep us posted on where you end up! And if you prove me wrong and find a great apartment in SF for less then $3,000/month, I'd be even happier for you :)
      Yeah I definitely meant more "Bay Area" than SF specifically. As far as job market, I have a degree in civil engineering which, luckily, seems to be something that's needed pretty much everywhere. I am definitely interested in a few cities in the midwest, Kansas City being one of them, so I might have to check that out more seriously now.


      Orion wrote:

      an actual bowling alley
      deng

      The post was edited 1 time, last by abokchoy ().

    • Okay just so you know, Kansas City is not a sleepy little Midwest town, the music and food scenes are amazing, they have a bakery selling homemade pop tarts, proof there are hipsters everywhere, and it’s very driveable. The BBQ is to die for and each month they have these Friday night art walks that are parties for blocks, oh and every food truck in town shows up. So yeah just something to consider!
    • My experiences are just from the other side of the puddle they keep calling Atlantic Ocean.
      I lived 20 years in my mom's house in southern Finnish town that got merged to Lahti, that made it 8th biggest city in Finland with 120k inhabitants (I know, we are a small nation)
      It was peaceful neighbourhood, practically a sub-urb, Lahti-city itself being tightly build, up to 8 story buildings, all concrete grey. You probably can see how depressing place it was.
      I moved out when I got married with my now ex-wife, to Middle-Finland, university city Jyväskylä.
      City itself is beautiful with plenty of old buildings, green spaces and nature all around.
      We started in 2 rooms and a kitchen appartment, after a year we moved to 3 rooms and a kitchen appartment cos we got our firts baby, then again after a year to a rowhouse with 4 rooms and a sauna. It was in 2 floors and my ex had kind of day care at our downstairs, upstairs being just for the family.
      After 3 years I needed just the thesis and I got a job from sourhern Finland so we moved back to Lahti to a 3 room appartment and I pendeld an hour per way daily. After a year we moved to the city center to a 3 room appartment, we got rid of a car and I pendeld with train and bike an hour. After 2 years living in that molden hole, my ex got to her head that we'd need to buy our own place. So we did buy 3 room appartment. A year or so after my wife came up that she wasn't happy and that I needed to change. A year fighting and I moved out, still paying half of the mortage since my wife couldn't get it in her name since being unemployed.
      So I moved to a 2 room appartment. Few crazy turns down the road, my best friend convinces his dad to buy me out of the mortage, moves in with my ex-wife.
      After 16 months living alone, I moved to Germany to a woman I got to know rather soon after the divorce, to a 3,5 room appartment. 3 years later we moved to a 4 room appartment last December and here we are.
      Either we stay here or we move to Finland since that'd be my wife's big dream.
      Let's see what comes
    • Ruki wrote:

      I’ve lived in Western New York my entire life, all within a couple hours of my childhood home. I lived in small cities surrounded by rural areas, and the rent was cheap since it’s hardly booming. I hated living in Jamestown, which is by the Pa. border - there was a lot of crime and while there was things to do, it was definitely an economically depressed area.

      Where I live now is between Buffalo and Rochester, two major cities in WNY. So it’s easy to get to two major hubs and the city itself is very small and easy to walk around in. It’s also relatively safe, and since we are surrounded by farmland there is constant farmers markets so it’s very easy to get fresh produce and meat.

      The biggest thing here I despise is snow and cold. If you aren’t used to driving in it, when we get hammered due to our close proximity to the lake it can be scary to drive in if you get out before the plows. If I ever had to leave NY I would want to go somewhere where the state is liberal like NY but warmer. I’d like to avoid tornado and hurricane prone areas, and a low crime small city.
      My family were dairy farmers in Randolph. Interesting area.

      I grew up in SLC. I love it here. If you are an outdoors person, this place is heaven. I have also lived in San Diego - loved the weather, hated the traffic and prices of everything, North Carolina - too humid for me, and about an hour north of Chicago - hard pass on that place.

      What is your degree in? Utah is kind of becoming a baby Silicon Valley. Great for tech peeps. We also have one of the best employment rates in the country. Salt Lake is a bigger city with a small town feel.

      The religious culture can be a little different at first but I don’t think it’s a big deal. I’m not LDS but my wife is. I have never been treated any differently because I’m not LDS.

      If you have any questions about SLC, let me know.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by sublime1996525 ().

    • I've been in and out of different places for periods of time, six months here, a year there, that kind of thing. I've lived in places like Miami, St. Louis, San Antonio, and a lot of smaller towns. Usually they've been for work in one form or another. In between it all I've always come back to Pittsburgh, and since switching jobs I bought a house near where I grew up. I have my heart set on staying in the area for the long run, and I managed to get a little land out in the country to enjoy. One thing I learned about living in the city is that I'm not a city person. I can take it in small doses, but man I just don't like staying there.
      It's a shame to ruin such a beautiful morning by being awake

      -Bill Watterson
    • Winnie wrote:

      Okay just so you know, Kansas City is not a sleepy little Midwest town, the music and food scenes are amazing, they have a bakery selling homemade pop tarts, proof there are hipsters everywhere, and it’s very driveable. The BBQ is to die for and each month they have these Friday night art walks that are parties for blocks, oh and every food truck in town shows up. So yeah just something to consider!
      I'm less worried about lack of "culture" and more about lack of...geographical diversity? When it comes to the midwest at least. I love the mountains and whatnot. I've also been told that winters are a bit depressing, which I'm also not sure about haha.

      sublime1996525 wrote:


      I grew up in SLC. I love it here. If you are an outdoors person, this place is heaven. I have also lived in San Diego - loved the weather, hated the traffic and prices of everything, North Carolina - too humid for me, and about an hour north of Chicago - hard pass on that place.

      What is your degree in? Utah is kind of becoming a baby Silicon Valley. Great for tech peeps. We also have one of the best employment rates in the country. Salt Lake is a bigger city with a small town feel.

      The religious culture can be a little different at first but I don’t think it’s a big deal. I’m not LDS but my wife is. I have never been treated any differently because I’m not LDS.

      If you have any questions about SLC, let me know.
      My degree is in civil engineering, so pretty essential no matter where I go I hope haha. And it's good to have more perspectives on the religion thing as well, between you and Orion and peeps I've talked to IRL.

      I forgot to mention that I am planning on going to grad school, and would love to have good in state options for my interests, which is another reason I'm looking at a lot of places on the west coast - though I may even just go back to texas for that anyways.
    • I've only moved once, and I guess it was relatively small compared to some of yours, although still a pretty big move on the scale of this little island that is Great Britain. I grew up in Walthamstow, London, where my dad's side of the family are from. When I was 18, I left school and my grandmother passed away, and by this time both of my parents had retired. So we had no reason to stay in London. And so we moved to a small town in the Peak District (pretty much in the middle of the country), where my parents had spent part of their honeymoon. And I've never looked back! It's a much nicer place to live, people are friendlier, most of the town seems to know each other and there's beautiful countryside just a few minutes away. I'm much happier here, and since moving here I've made some awesome friends and become much more confident.
    • Skywing wrote:

      I've only moved once, and I guess it was relatively small compared to some of yours, although still a pretty big move on the scale of this little island that is Great Britain. I grew up in Walthamstow, London, where my dad's side of the family are from. When I was 18, I left school and my grandmother passed away, and by this time both of my parents had retired. So we had no reason to stay in London. And so we moved to a small town in the Peak District (pretty much in the middle of the country), where my parents had spent part of their honeymoon. And I've never looked back! It's a much nicer place to live, people are friendlier, most of the town seems to know each other and there's beautiful countryside just a few minutes away. I'm much happier here, and since moving here I've made some awesome friends and become much more confident.
      Sometimes I feel tempted to go somewhere a little more out in the country, in a smaller city. I just don't feel ready for that in someways haha.
    • I haven’t moved a whole lot.

      Living with parents:

      • Grew up in a townhouse. Rented. Our street had 911 calls basically every day. We had a prostitution house across the street. Their “pimp” lived next door. We uh, def saw some shit living there.
      • My grandpa died, so we moved in to my grandmas house with her so she wouldn’t have to get rid of it and live in an old folks home. It was at the time like a 5 year old house. About a 25 minute walk from the old place, but a waaaaaau nicer area. New side of town. Across the street from the college.
      • I moved into my first apartment about a 30 minute walk from the house soon after getting my first legit job. The rent was really, really cheap. It was awesome. And the apartment was huge. And the building wasn’t primarily elderly people, so it was a quiet building. Had some roommate trouble. It was bad enough that I decided I never wanted to have a roommate ever again, so
      • I bought a house after 2 years of living in that apartment. This is on the other side of town. So I can’t walk to work anymore. But it’s only a 5-15 minute drive depending on weather and if I hit all the lights. Haha. I still have “roommates” but since I own the place I feel less uncomfortable if any issues do arise (and so far there hasn’t really been any because these guys are better than the old roommate)
      This has all been in the same city. And it’s not a huge city. Haha. I haven’t gone far and currently I don’t plan to. I have a house that I’m quite happy with. I’m close to work, have a job I really like, my family is here, etc. I’m happy with where I am and I don’t see myself moving for a little while yet.

      It’s a long way off (I’m 26) but eventually I would like to retire out east somewhere near or in Halifax or Nova Scotia somewhere.