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    What are They Thinking?? [Discussion on the Direction of the Series]
    • Since E3 2016 Aonuma has been very transparent about not only what went into making Breath of the Wild but also his intentions for the future of the series. I figured we could compile developer quotes from Aonuma or even Fujibayashi and Miyamoto to get a better picture of what they're thinking. And I think it all starts with the backlash Aonuma heard over SS's overly linear nature:

      Aonuma wrote:

      So there was something that the fans said before starting development that changed what I thought.

      There was a fan that said he really, really loved Zelda. But while playing Skyward Sword, he missed experiencing this huge world where he could just ride Epona around, and somewhere within myself I felt the same way; for Breath of the Wild, it's something that I definitely thought about.

      After Skyward Sword we really needed to develop a bigger world, but we've actually never done that. So a lot of it was trial and error, and we had to feel things out.

      A lot of the fans that played Skyward Sword said that they were really bummed out that they couldn’t find the hidden element of the game. A lot of the users, when they looked at the map, they said, ‘OK, there’s these places I can go, but how come I can’t go over here?’

      A lot of Zelda fans are the type of people that really like to explore those hidden elements. I realized that creating this bigger world and letting them freely play may be the solution to all of that.

      I’ve always thought that when creating a 3D game where it’s easy for users to get lost, it’s really important to tell the users what they need to do. But then, after creating this larger world, I realized that getting lost isn’t that bad. Having the option to do whatever you want and get lost is actually kind of fun. I think fans that enjoy a more linear type of gameplay will also enjoy this type of gameplay.

      We got a lot of feedback from the people that played Skyward Sword. There were these pockets of worlds that players were able to dive into, but they really wanted to see what was in between those worlds – all the hidden elements they weren’t able to see. I thought that was really natural for Zelda fans, who like to explore, to uncover little secrets. We realised that we needed to make this free, open-air world.

      Fujiyabashi wrote:

      After working on Skyward Sword, we took in a lot of the feedback from fans, as well as what [producer Eiji Aonuma] had been thinking, along with myself. And then we came up with this concept of really breaking conventions, and also we were looking to create the next iteration of Zelda. It all kind of lined up to create this new direction.

      One thing that I knew we didn’t want to change was the aspect of discovery and exploration, and the joy that you get from discovering something new. There’s also the idea of puzzle solving. You think about it, you try some ideas, and when you’re finally able to solve a puzzle, that joy and sense of accomplishment is something that I think speaks really truly to the Zelda franchise. And I wanted to make sure that that was still intact in the game.

      When we watched people play at E3 we realized that they were playing in the way that we envisioned, and when we saw that and people were reacting positively, that’s when I said, “Alright, this is the right direction.”

      From a planning perspective, you look at Skyward Sword and it’s kind of an extension of the Zelda conventions that we’d established in the past. So it was easy to explain what the concept was to the rest of the team. However, with [Breath of the Wild] it’s a completely new idea, and we’re trying to show the staff, to explain to the staff, something that hasn’t existed before. That was a challenge and was difficult to do.
      I've been noticing that every time they mention Breath of the Wild with any game in the past they focus on distinguishing it from them, rather than focussing on the similarities. This to me is the exact mindset they're in, not necessarily finding what worked in past games but rather finding what did not work in those games and doing pretty-much the exact opposite.

      Its not only Skyward Sword they compare it to, however. Aonuma and Miyamoto also have said a few things around the time Breath of the Wild launched about Twilight Princess and the things they wanted to change from that experience.

      Aonuma wrote:

      Way back in the day, dungeons weren’t all that big. They were rather small. But around Twilight Princess, they started getting bigger. We tried to cram in a lot of surprises for the player, or a lot of emotions, meeting other characters, or injecting story elements into it. But then we kind of realized, do dungeons really need to be that big? Do we have to cram that much stuff into it? We quickly realized that a lot of the fun was actually in getting to the dungeon, and so we focused on getting to the dungeon in this game. We wanted to create an environment where it is fun to find the dungeon in this large world.

      S Miyamoto wrote:

      The balance of "sparsity" and "density" in [Breath of the Wild] works really well. This is something that's important in Zelda. A real challenge with Twilight Princess was that as development moved from the earlier stages into the latter half, that balance was lost. The 3D Modelling Team was steadily expanding the size of the game, but the actual content of the game was not keeping pace. The longer the 3D modelling and the content remain out of step, the emptier the game becomes. Or, game content starts interfering with other content and spoiling it. Trying to get that under control is a real challenge. Putting it another way, perhaps it's controlling the balance of "sparsity" and "density" that actually makes a Zelda game. Maybe this isn't limited to Zelda... Maybe it's the "Nintendo method" of making games...

      Aonuma wrote:

      At first, we were planning to include more large, labyrinth-style dungeons, the sort of things you'd expect in a Zelda title. But the reason we decided to include the smaller shrines, which isn't to say there aren't some larger dungeons in Breath of the Wild was to strike a balance, between this extremely large (over)world that you're exploring, and these goals and objectives to explore within that. So by dotting these shrines around a larger number of them, but with each smaller in size than the older-style dungeons it helped bring up balance, and break up the huge world into smaller, explore-able chunks. Now, that is something that we hit upon midway through the development process, but it wasn't as a result of us beginning development for the Nintendo Switch. It was purely something to do from a game design point of view.

      So in the past Zelda games, one dungeon was very, very long and because this game had a very wide field to explore and one of the themes we had was finding things, we were thinking about what the ratio is for finding Shrines while players are wandering around the field. And when we calculated that, we kind of ended up with 100 or more Shrines. And as for size, we thought about perhaps making long, big dungeons, but that would take long, and players would dedicate their time too long in the dungeons, so we thought perhaps one Shrine is maybe 10 minutes. We’re thinking play would be a good amount.
      It mostly has to do with the reconsideration on the dungeon convention in this case. But Twilight Princess seems to also have come into their minds when considering what to change about the newest title and the future of the series. Again, not much can be found of these two explaining Twilight Princess' similarities to Breath of the Wild, but they sure do shed light on the contrast between how each was developed. Although, this isn't the first time either of these two have expressed their regrets about the development of Twilight Princess.

      Aonuma wrote:

      For Twilight Princess we used the adult Link and one of the interesting things about that was how we considered the precise proportions of Link and the world. The scale is because we aimed for a more realistic quality in the size of the environments of Hyrule and what that Link faced, but the question is whether or not we were able to incorporate any and all of the interesting game ideas that were able to take advantage of that kind of sheer grand scale within the Zelda universe. I am afraid that definitely no, we were not able to do all the things that perhaps with hindsight we had the capabilities to do.

      S Miyamoto wrote:

      In the past we've worked with some outside development houses on titles like F-Zero and Starfox - and let me just say that we were disappointed with the results. Consumers got very excited about the idea of those games, but the games themselves did not deliver. And, well, to be honest with you, Zelda: Twilight Princess is not doing very well at all in Japan. It is very disappointing.
      So, of course, now the team is looking forward in the series. Aonuma's already confirmed the development of the next game. But what has he said about his mindset as they start this new project?

      Aonuma wrote:

      I think while we were working on both the main game and the DLC, it was a process of constantly getting lots of different, new ideas as we refined the game, and finding new things we wanted to do. Even in situations like this, talking to people and finding out that people want to pet dogs gives me a lot of motivation, a lot of ideas for things we could put into the game.

      You know, I can’t speak to what other people, other companies will do in their own games, but I think for me, especially just in terms of the Zelda series, the incredible freedom that this game offers you and how well that’s been received…to me, it means that freedom, that level of freedom is something that needs to be maintained in Zelda games going forward. My eyes have been opened to how important that is.

      次回作はより大変になると思うが、オープンエアーを進化させるのか、ダンジョンクリア型を作るのか、どうなる?
      Do you think your next work will be difficult, and will it be 'open-air' or will it be a 'clear-the-dungeon' type of game?

      「多分今後は、これがスタンダードな形になっていくと思う。」
      "In the future, I think this [open-air] will become the standard."
      Obviously, he hasn't elaborated much on what aspects of the open-air experience he intends to keep in the series. But it sounds to me like they've been seeing the acclaim the game has been getting and have been getting very excited about that as they go into development on the new project. And so far I haven't heard them talking about wanting to "outdo" Breath of the Wild, only that they intend to keep riding this wave of inspiration they've been on since development began in 2013/2014. Only the dev team knows what the next step for the franchise will be. So here I figured we could talk about what the dev team might be thinking as they work on the next Zelda and what the next game could turn into. We don't have a whole lot of ramp on, but we do have these and perhaps other quotes that some of you know about. Either way, I think we can all agree this is a very interesting time for the Zelda series!
    • The Baton of the Wind wrote:

      There was a fan that said he really, really loved Zelda. But while playing Skyward Sword, he missed experiencing this huge world where he could just ride Epona around, and somewhere within myself I felt the same way; for Breath of the Wild, it's something that I definitely thought about.
      I think that the sky had potential to be immersive if it didn't have empty islands and had more things to do and explore in it. It was boring, I wanted to see all the cool things that could be up in the heavens. So, riding a loftwing instead of epona would've been a good experience.

      Though, I do not like loftwings and prefer epona over them.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by PurpleandRed ().

    • Great thread, and I would be pleased if we could gather more and especially future quotes from especially Aonuma when it comes to the next console title specifically. I remember the time during BotW's development where he said stuff almost all the time, so this thread could be very useful to gather everything as soon as he says something new, and incorporate in the first post so it gets easy to find.

      The last DLC ended at around the end of 2017, and I think they confirmed that they had started development of the next game around the same time. That means that they should have worked on the next title for at least one year now. That to say, it doesn't mean that much, since we have no idea what they have been working on. It can easily be 100 % concept work or experiments with the controls (like the HD-rumble).

      From all the excitement that Aonuma has expressed, especially when Nintendo won the game of the year-prize (Game Awards) it sounded like he had a lot of motivation to start on the next one, so I don't think they will lay on the lazy side.

      I don't like however how they seem to make distance to the eariler titles. Yes there are a lot of complaints about Skyward Sword and Twilight Princess, but they are not all bad. These games have a lot of good qualities too, just like BotW has a lot of flaws. There is a reason why Twilight Princess is one of the best selling Zelda titles so far, and why many Wii U-owners bought the HD-versions of Wind Waker and Twilight Princess. They should just stop to look at the past with gloomy eyes and instead take inspiration from what those past titles did good.

      For the next title, I just don't want a "BotW 2.0", but rather a mix of BotW and the past titles. Now they have proven that they are capable to do open world-games, now they can focus a tiny bit less on that and instead focusing on to strike a great balance between freedom and depth.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by MVS ().

    • Another BotW might work, but personally I'd rather see them try something different. I think it'll still most likely be an open-world game but they can still, for example, focus more on a single big town (or several) like MM, or maybe once again change how the shrines or dungeons work, add different biomes, etc.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ich Will ().

    • When BotW was about to be revealed, I also did some research like this. I had quotes like "the motion controlled sword fighting in SS is so great, I don't think we'll ever make a Zelda game without it."

      I learned that half of their quotes are about hyping up their latest games.
      But nice thread, I'll have to read more later.
      100% | Finished | Now playing:
      TLoZ | 2nd Q | TAoL | ALttP | LA | LA DX | OoT | OoT MQ | MM | OoA | OoS | ALttP (GBA) | FS | TWW | FSA | TMC | TP | LCT | PH | ST | OoT 3D | FS AE | SS | ALBW | MM 3D | TFH | TP HD | BotW
    • Canyarion wrote:

      When BotW was about to be revealed, I also did some research like this. I had quotes like "the motion controlled sword fighting in SS is so great, I don't think we'll ever make a Zelda game without it."

      I learned that half of their quotes are about hyping up their latest games.
      But nice thread, I'll have to read more later.

      But that quote was very close to the release of SS. Not soon after, we got new quotes from him where he pretty much stated that motion controls are not for everyone, and this was before the reveal of BotW. A lot of stuff Aonuma stated before BotW turned out to be spot on, like his quote that he wanted a very short tutorial for "Zelda Wii U", and that was precisely what we got.

      One of the most interesting quotes so far for the next game, was a quote where he wanted to mix the open world-experience from BotW with some kind of multiplayer... which can turn out both good and terrible depending on how they do it. If they ever seriously consider multiplayer for a true console Zelda title, it HAS to be a very good singleplayer-option where the other characters are controlled by good AI. I have been interested in a party system, but that may not be right for Zelda, but it COULD be. But this is a very early quote, so it is very possible that it just was a thought that later got or will be scrapped altogether. Multiplayer for Zelda sounds very risky.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by MVS ().

    • MVS wrote:



      From all the excitement that Aonuma has expressed, especially when Nintendo won the game of the year-prize (Game Awards) it sounded like he had a lot of motivation to start on the next one, so I don't think they will lay on the lazy side.
      One thing I'm noticing more specifically is the inspiration to add in new ideas and world details they're thinking up. That's probably the most exciting part to me. That's a big part of what made BotW so great and would love to see more creative ideas make their way into the series.

      I don't like however how they seem to make distance to the eariler titles. Yes there are a lot of complaints about Skyward Sword and Twilight Princess, but they are not all bad. These games have a lot of good qualities too, just like BotW has a lot of flaws. There is a reason why Twilight Princess is one of the best selling Zelda titles so far, and why many Wii U-owners bought the HD-versions of Wind Waker and Twilight Princess. They should just stop to look at the past with gloomy eyes and instead take inspiration from what those past titles did good.
      Well, while we can say they did include the better ideas from games like TP and SS, its true they don't talk about that much. And I think that's just them showing us they've delivered regarding the complaints of those games. The selling point was how the conventions were broken and what better way to convey that message than by distinguishing BotW apart from those conventions?

      It seems like those they are gonna keep away from conventions and continue their efforts to evolve the series given their quotes thus far. This is something I personally am gonna keep an eye out for when new interviews occur. Like how Aonuma specifically stated he intends to keep the open-air style as opposed to a "clear-the-dungeon" style; and as he said with BotW this doesn't mean there won't be dungeons but they won't exist in the conventional form.
    • The Baton of the Wind wrote:

      Either way, I think we can all agree this is a very interesting time for the Zelda series!
      If you would consider watching how quickly someone can absolutely destroy the thing you the loved the most to be an “interesting time”, then yes, I suppose it’s an interesting time for the series.

      Honestly I’m just too tired to even break this apart piece by piece and point out everything wrong with this in my opinion, so instead I’ll just say they utterly missed the point of what Zelda was about and even failed at part of what they were going for according to their own words. Long story short, they decided to fix what wasn’t broken and as a result created a visually beautiful trainwreck that although aesthetically pleasing in a general sense quickly lost all of its appeal exactly because they took out all of the surprises that would have been worth finding, abandoned the actually good plans they had (such as the huge dungeons that you could get lost in that were each unique), went too non-linear for a Zelda game for the story and feeling of progression to be any good, made 98% of the characters either forgettable or utterly unlikeable, and copy/pasted basically every dungeon, shrine, korok puzzle, and all of the ruins you can find. Meanwhile, the only thing they think about is the important issue of making dogs pettable.

      News flash, Aonuma-san and everyone else on the Zelda team: There are a lot more important things in a game than having “complete freedom”. But you wouldn’t know anything about that, would you? Of course not. Because this game is being praised as perfect, that’s all that matters.

      I don’t consider myself a difficult person to move with a story, and BotW was the first Zelda game that I found the story of to be utterly unmoving and uninteresting as a whole.

      I’m done. I’m completely done with the future “Zelda.” You all can keep it.

      Celebrating 3 whole years of ZU membership -- 8/22/2015 - 8/22/2018
    • Linkle wrote:



      If you would consider watching how quickly someone can absolutely destroy the thing you the loved the most to be an “interesting time”, then yes, I suppose it’s an interesting time for the series.
      I'm not so sure they destroyed anything. Looks like its doing fine to me! Its sold more than any Zelda game, its recieved quite a bit of acclaim, and its inspired the dev team a great deal moving forward. But I get what you mean, its not what you enjoyed about the series. To be fair, however, they did warn you far ahead of time they were foregoing many conventions the series was stuck in since OoT... Js

      I've been playing Zelda since 1992. I'm not old enough to have been there when the series officially first kicked off, but I was there to enjoy Zelda as it was before OoT. And as someone who has been playing this long, I can say without a doubt they got it right what Zelda is all about in BotW, and its far more than just the freedom of play. As a matter of fact, somewhere between OoT & SS they had forgotten what Zelda was all about; and part of that has to do with Miyamoto passing the series down to Aonuma. Also, I believe focussing on making the game itself better and worrying about the superficial aspects later is a big part of this change in direction with BotW. Its how Miyamoto did things back in the day, and he even openly admitted it often. That is the most interesting part, to me, about their direction going forward. And I have to say, BotW was very enjoyable and fun for me personally so I am intrigued at how they will handle the next title since they're most likely gonna do something different from that and different from the earlier conventions.

      The series was very broken before BotW. It was apparent not only in sales but in general reception as well. There were so many people who didn't like the direction the series was in at the time of SS that Aonuma heard and made changes accordingly. And its not like freedom was the whole of the issue, though it was the biggest complaint they heard. I for one did not think it was fun to complete a whole adventure and end up with a cutscene as a reward. I actually find cutscenes in video games annoying. I thought ALttP was bad with that back in the day, but then I played OoT. Also, never liked all the "secrets" being relegated to mere dungeons. If you put them all in one place, where you know you're gonna find em, that takes the "surprise" aspect out of it entirely. Finding secrets and other things along your adventure is much more fun and not to mention far more surprising than finding them in dungeons.

      In any event, I feel like whenever Aonuma gets quiet is when the announcement of a new game is coming soon. And this time seems no different, imo. It has, after all, been almost 2 years since BotW dropped. Should be an announcement soon and then we can finally get more interviewage than we've been getting recently...
    • I agree with Baton. I think wuth those that had been playing before OOT came out, there was a bit of the 'magic' that got lost. To those that had OOT and it's games as part of their childhood it might feel like a travesty, but it was a necessary move, because Zelda WAS losing fans. Judging by the response that BOTW got, it seemed to be the right one.
    • Makuta Teridax wrote:

      BotW is a step in the right direction. I don't want them to go back to the tired OoT formula, especially after the travesty that was Twilight Princess.
      Definitely. Many of the 3D games had become OOT-lite with a gimmick or two thrown in. What was worse, was that people had come to expect Zelda to be that, you see a lot of the folks who had grown up with OOT being their first game and being used to having everything emulate that one game, you see them complaining that BOTW doesn't 'feel' like Zelda. Unfortunately OOT ended up being the 'standard' far too long, each game becoming a rote checklist and a mostly-linear affair that really didn't allow you to actually explore on your own.
    • I completely recognize and accept that to everyone else that is the truth, and I’m glad for all of you that you got the Zelda you wanted, but as someone who sees OoT, TP, and SS as some of the happiest times I ever had playing games and the most enjoyable, I can’t say I understand or that I will ever agree. I must respectfully disagree and shake my head at what Zelda has become.

      I’ve played the old games; I’ve played all of them, and I didn’t see what you all are cheering for now that was in pre-OoT games as being anything other than the best they could do with the technology they had, and I personally think OoT was the best thing that ever happened to the series in regards to a turning point, even though I don’t see it as the best game in the series.

      You know, it’s funny — until BotW came out, all I ever heard was praise for OoT and hailing it as the best game that hadn’t yet been topped by any Zelda game after, and now suddenly it’s being demonized and called stale and boring. Yes yes, bring on the comments of how that was all just nostalgia and you all saw the light when the savior to mankind that is BotW came out, but I still have to disagree that that’s what it was. See, I had an advantage most people didn’t; when I got into the series, I was never at a point where OoT was my first game. I had them all and played them all within the space of a few meager years, so none of it was nostalgia for me, it was based on what I personally enjoyed the most out of all that the series had to offer, so don’t come at me saying those things because they aren’t true.

      Oh well, but what do I know? All I know is that I only have a few series that I love — a handful — across media and in the last year I’ve lost all but one to these outcries of the public that everything should be about “complete freedom” and “to heck with traditions/conventions”.

      Look, I don’t mean to be bitter, and I’m sorry if I am, it’s not that I don’t care how others feel; I’d be happy if we could have both kinds of Zelda games so we could both have what we love, but it’s clear that’s not what they want and when I only have around 5 things I truly loved at the absolute most, I don’t think it’s unreasonable for me to have the right to feel upset that these “popular opinions” have taken almost all of them away from me.

      Celebrating 3 whole years of ZU membership -- 8/22/2015 - 8/22/2018

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Linkle ().

    • That still counts as being introduced to the series after OoT existed. What I meant by "I started before OoT" is that OoT didn't even exist yet when I was introduced to the series, it probably wasn't even an idea yet in 1992. We didn't know anything other than what Zelda is all about. Modern gaming is what it is, but Zelda was founded and built upon far different fundamentals and as the series evolved into the modern era the dev team forgot about many of these fundamentals more and more slowly over time. BotW gets back to these fundamentals and builds upon them while also taking down some of the things that were replacing them OoT onward.
      And really, they were unable to do what they wanted on the N64 and even the GCN because of hardware limitations. Miyamoto has said before that when they were making the OoT overworld, they wanted to give the player a feeling they were in a big world. But just look at it, its so empty and lacks a lot of monsters. In the older games, there were lots of little secrets and it was hard to get around without running into monsters. And at E3 2014, Aonuma said that when creating TWW they wanted to actually create a vast world with lots of secrets. Now TWW has a lot of secrets, and introduced other collectables for the series, but Aonuma specifically said on more than one occaision that they were unable to make the world the way they wanted because of hardware limitations. They wanted bigger islands, more than one entrypoint in each island, but could not.
      And that's the thing. Without the capabilities to do what they originally wanted to do, they opted to make up for it by shoving a bunch of long, unskipable cutscenes in our faces and making dungeons longer while making the explorable world smaller and moving all the secrets and most of the monsters to the dungeons themselves. And that isn't what Zelda is all about, not at all... Not to mention, handholding became a thing which - in collaberation with dungeon-heavy content - takes away the surprise and the discovery aspects of the adventure itself; as well as making the game tedious to play and instead making it more of a cinematic game to just watch and simply follow the prompts as opposed to beating the game in your own fashion. I mean, its one thing to have an objective like "go find the pendant of courage" but its a whole different ball game to have a backseat companion constantly chiding the player along a beaten path.
      The thing of it is though, BotW can be both kinds of Zelda games. There are prompts that tell you where to go at all times so you can make your journey as linear and storydriven as you want. There are cutscenes, and even with voice acting. The thing of it is, the prompts are optional; and the cutscenes are skippable. There is a ton of optional content/features in BotW. This is exactly how to meet the two sides in the middle. Those of us who are more bothered by these things and just wanna play don't have to be forced to endure them, and the people who want them got them.
      Yes, they have moved a majority of the content out of the dungeons and into the overworld, but that's just how it used to be. The dungeons were quite short back in the day, as Aonuma has pointed out, and really they were there to serve the purpose as an end to a main quest objective, as opposed to being the whole of the main quest objective. And that is simply what they've done with BotW. Basically, they are breaking conventions started by OoT and subsequent games while bringing back pre-OoT conventions like those mentioned above. And honestly, they shouldn't have to make everyone else suffer because some were disappointed with the new product. When making anything ever, there are going to be people who don't like it. That's just business. But give the people what they want. People wanted more freedom, were getting tired of having their hands held, and tired of the same old thing.
    • Funny enough, I was introduced at ALttP(Well before OoT came out), and the series' narrative, story, and atmosphere are some of the absolute most important things in the series to me. I can still remember watching ALttP's intro over and over, even when I could barely read, because it captivated me and created a sense I was playing some kind of legendary epic. Cutscenes, exposition, lore, all of that intrinsically makes the series more fun to me. The concept of your actions in-game affecting the course of the series' history adds a lot of gravity to everything you do. To me, a good story doesn't take away from the game, it drives it, and gives weight and meaning to it.


      I don't think I have anything new to suggest as to where the series should go from here. They wanted to correct the wrongs of past games, and they succeeded. But they also threw the baby out with the bathwater narrative/lorewise, and they need to hospitalize the child and bring it back in. Anyone who doesn't like the baby can continue not to look at it. The lead devs clearly don't like the baby, but it's too late now, they've gotta take care of it.
    • To play an advocate for the side that dislikes BotW (I say this as someone that actually enjoyed BotW but has nostalgia for OoT as well), sales and critical reception aren't necessarily an indication that most things with a product is inherently correct. For example, TP for the Wii also sold a lot of copies and got pretty good scores, correct me if I'm wrong.

      The dislike for BotW from some people is in my opinion kind of because Nintendo have been focusing on other aspects of the series ever since OoT. It's just the way it goes when a fanbase has such different priorities, some people just won't like such drastic change.

      I do agree that the old formula had its problems though, but I also agree with those that say that some parts of it may have been thrown out unnecessarily.

      And regarding the matter of going back to the roots of LoZ... I think it makes sense in a way, but it also feels rather convenient considering today's trend of open-world games. How can one determine what Zelda is really all about anyway? I'd say it's a subjective thing (within the confines of what the series has offered so far of course).

      The post was edited 3 times, last by ich Will ().