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    Rumor: Netflix Castlevania producer doing a Zelda series
    • Another one of these rumours huuuuh?

      I actually do enjoy the stories and worlds Zelda games have, with Wind Waker being a favourite of mine, but if you stripped out the puzzles and exploration and items and actual playing from Zelda there's not much to work with in terms of raw story. It doesn't naturally lend itself to movies/TV imo like other franchises would. So I think they'll need to take a lot of creative liberties to make it truly great, at which point I just think why not do a new fantasy IP altogether? Gotta keep that brand value I guess. BUT!!! A talented team can make anything work. And I've heard positive things about the Castlevania thing I guess, even though I've not watched it. So, bring it on! If it's got the right team that are fans of the franchise, they could do something fun.

      If it's true, I'll definitely tune in. But it's not something I expect to happen at all. Will happily be wrong on that though :3
    • GregariousTree wrote:

      @lord-of-shadow You don't think MM, like I suggested above? I agree about WW, but I don't really see TP, it's too similar to OoT in my mind. I suppose it could work though.
      It could maybe work as a story, but I think it's too weird. They'd want to use classic Zelda things like the Master Sword, Triforce, Zelda, and Ganon/dorf. What's the point of using a big brand if they're not gonna, you know, use it?
    • lord-of-shadow wrote:

      GregariousTree wrote:

      @lord-of-shadow You don't think MM, like I suggested above? I agree about WW, but I don't really see TP, it's too similar to OoT in my mind. I suppose it could work though.
      It could maybe work as a story, but I think it's too weird. They'd want to use classic Zelda things like the Master Sword, Triforce, Zelda, and Ganon/dorf. What's the point of using a big brand if they're not gonna, you know, use it?
      Well, I think it would definitely work as a story, arguably more than any other Zelda game. But you make a good point about it being too different. I was just wondering because Castlevania focusing on Trevor Belmont's story rather than Simon's kind of surprised me, so maybe Shankar would pull out a less obvious choice for Zelda too... but yeah, that's not a good comparison. I'm standing by WW being the best candidate for a straight TV adaptation.
      A dark chase requires a silent hound, and deep roots are not reached by the frost.
    • GregariousTree wrote:

      lord-of-shadow wrote:

      GregariousTree wrote:

      @lord-of-shadow You don't think MM, like I suggested above? I agree about WW, but I don't really see TP, it's too similar to OoT in my mind. I suppose it could work though.
      It could maybe work as a story, but I think it's too weird. They'd want to use classic Zelda things like the Master Sword, Triforce, Zelda, and Ganon/dorf. What's the point of using a big brand if they're not gonna, you know, use it?
      Well, I think it would definitely work as a story, arguably more than any other Zelda game. But you make a good point about it being too different. I was just wondering because Castlevania focusing on Trevor Belmont's story rather than Simon's kind of surprised me, so maybe Shankar would pull out a less obvious choice for Zelda too... but yeah, that's not a good comparison. I'm standing by WW being the best candidate for a straight TV adaptation.
      There's really no deep story with Simon Belmont, aside from the basic good vs. evil setup. Focusing on Castlevania III, Symphony of the Night (and Curse of Darkness, it seems) offered a suitably broad array of characters and much more compelling backstories to explore.

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    • Mirren wrote:

      GregariousTree wrote:

      lord-of-shadow wrote:

      GregariousTree wrote:

      @lord-of-shadow You don't think MM, like I suggested above? I agree about WW, but I don't really see TP, it's too similar to OoT in my mind. I suppose it could work though.
      It could maybe work as a story, but I think it's too weird. They'd want to use classic Zelda things like the Master Sword, Triforce, Zelda, and Ganon/dorf. What's the point of using a big brand if they're not gonna, you know, use it?
      Well, I think it would definitely work as a story, arguably more than any other Zelda game. But you make a good point about it being too different. I was just wondering because Castlevania focusing on Trevor Belmont's story rather than Simon's kind of surprised me, so maybe Shankar would pull out a less obvious choice for Zelda too... but yeah, that's not a good comparison. I'm standing by WW being the best candidate for a straight TV adaptation.
      There's really no deep story with Simon Belmont, aside from the basic good vs. evil setup. Focusing on Castlevania III, Symphony of the Night (and Curse of Darkness, it seems) offered a suitably broad array of characters and much more compelling backstories to explore.
      Yeah, I realized that. It's not a good comparison to MM vs. any other Zelda game.
      A dark chase requires a silent hound, and deep roots are not reached by the frost.
    • Having about it a lot, I've deduced that the best course of action would be direct adaptations. I just don't see what story you could tell that wouldn't just as easily work for a game. The adaptations wouldn't replace the games, just be an alternate version of them that is equally canon. Sorta like the difference between Lego games and the movies they're based on: all the key plot points are the same, but the details are different because of the medium.
      The Twilight Realm was basically wizard Australia where every naughty banished person was transformed into some sort of harmless albino penguins.
      ~ Gamtos

      WW is Nintendo's Up, basically. Link is Russell, Tetra is Doug, and uh, I guess maybe Tingle is Kevin?

      ~ Gregarious Tree
    • I'm treating any rumour of a Zelda Netflix series the same way I'm treating the on-again, off-again news of a Dark Crystal series. Until I actually see it in my Recommended For Me list, I'm not getting my hopes up.

      What I'm waiting for is Blue Planet II to be released on Netflix, and the new She-Ra series.


      BotW Zelda in her purple Hylian Tunic, by my husband, DarkSilver.

      "Breath of the Wild: "Zelda's Redemption" Chapter 3 now up!

      After Calamity Ganon's defeat, a devastated Zelda must come to terms with her ruined kingdom, dead friends, and the resentment of the Hero who had saved her, but lost his fiancee. When all hope seems lost, she comes across a legend of a holy relic that can set things right, if she can find the ancient keys to access it. With the help of new friends, and without Link, can Zelda finally become a legend, on her own terms?
    • Zelda has plenty of storytelling potential, in the hands of someone who knows what they're doing and is both able and willing to make necessary changes.


      1. No game should be the basis for the story.

      Even the game I consider to have the single best story in the series - Ocarina of Time - would make for an underwhelming story in a TV series if no changes were made to it. The majority of the time spent in the games is either in the overworld, traversing the landscape, or in the dungeons - not exactly the most exciting stuff. But a TV series wouldn't even have to deal with dungeons at all, or be confined by any of the conventions of the games, so it shouldn't be chained to any of the games at all.


      2. The mythos of the series should be faithful to the games, easy to grasp, and should be centered around the Triforce.

      Three goddesses created Hyrule and left behind a piece of their power called the Triforce. People want the Triforce because it can grant any wish. Should evil claim it, turmoil will befall the world. There, that's your basis for compelling conflict. Now you can chock the story full of compelling characters who might seek out the Triforce for their own purposes, not just villains like Ganondorf but also those who might want the Triforce for other reasons; a selfish rogue wanting riches, a desperate traveller seeking to save a deathly ill loved one, there are plenty of things you can do to center the story around the Triforce in a way that is not just true to the series but also makes it easy for us to quickly get a sense of what different characters want and how they might come into conflict. Plenty of room for character growth too - some might realize that pursuing the Triforce for selfish reasons is not the way, while others might be fully consumed by their desire to have their deepest wish granted.


      3. Keep Ganondorf as the villain and make him a constant, looming but unseen threat.

      One of the most compelling parts of Ocarina of Time was in how well the game handled its antagonist, and it's something the TV series can utilize as well. However, it can add even more to the story by having Ganondorf be an ever-present threat that keeps being referred to and referenced at various turns in the story, but never showing his face - at most appearing as a silhouette, or with his back turned, or seen riding through flames on his big black horse with his red cape flowing ominously (that was a good look for him in Ocarina of Time, I say keep it in). It'd be a bit like the way Fire Lord Ozai was done in Avatar: The Last Airbender up to the final season. And of course, you have to end the series by having Ganondorf transform into Ganon. You have to.


      4. Have Link as the protagonist if you must, but do not make him a stoic and do not make him travel alone.

      Whoever is the protagonist needs to be relatable. Preferably the most relatable of all the characters, but at the very least relatable enough. Likable too. Link can be those things, but not as the quiet, brave swordsman that we might think of him as. If it becomes too difficult to see Link as anything else, no biggie; just change the protagonist. Make it princess Zelda if need be. Whoever it is, needs companions to travel with. Also, the protagonist should have their own reasons for seeking the Triforce, and they should be the ones we cheer on the most to get it.
    • Abyss Master wrote:

      Link can be those things, but not as the quiet, brave swordsman that we some might think of him as.
      FTFY

      Abyss Master wrote:

      1. No game should be the basis for the story
      Like I said, while I thought the same at first, I struggle to see what story could possibly be told wouldn't work just as well as a game. There should be reason for it to be a show instead.

      Abyss Master wrote:

      3. Keep Ganondorf as the villain and make him a constant, looming but unseen threat.
      Assuming we're following game canon, this isn't really possible (unless you do the same ass-pull FSA did), as there is only one Ganondorf, and we see what happens to him in all timelines, leaving no room for him to reappear in human form.

      As for making him an Ozai-style unseen looming threat, somehow, I just don't see that working. I guess we've seen him in action too much already. That said, I suppose you could pull it off by giving him a role similar to the one he has in TP, minus the overused and, in all cases but this one, largely unearned Hijacked by Ganon trope.

      In terms of "looming threat" type villains, they could go more abstract with Calamity Ganon (BotW did a horrible job with him, but it could be done well). Think XANA, Sauron, or Giygas.
      The Twilight Realm was basically wizard Australia where every naughty banished person was transformed into some sort of harmless albino penguins.
      ~ Gamtos

      WW is Nintendo's Up, basically. Link is Russell, Tetra is Doug, and uh, I guess maybe Tingle is Kevin?

      ~ Gregarious Tree
    • I don't know if it's been mentioned before but if a story were to be adapted I'd have my vote for the Hylian Civil War.

      It would introduce so much lore and watching the kingdoms at war would provide plenty of drama as the leaders of each race struggle for dominance. Have the story focus on Links father and mother in sort of a "Gotham" kind of way where characters we know and love in OoT are introduced and showcased how they become who they are when Link meets them.

      This way the writers can provide a more forgiving personality to Link's Father as the protagonist. So fans can say "Oh well, I'm not too happy with this personality but since it's not Link it's okay."

      I wish I could explain how I see it in my head better but this is the best I have for now.
      Courage is not the absence of fear, it is the ability to overcome it.
    • @MORPHRELINK I think that's the best idea I've read so far. It could also focus on a young and ambitious Ganondorf who manipulates his way to power.

      Making a sequel season to that could be a problem though.
      100% | Finished | Now playing:
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    • I wouldn't want it to be a very long show anyway but as far as I'm aware the Civil War went on for years. With a world as massive as Hyrule it shouldn't be a problem to fill it to the brim with content and lore. There a re plenty of characters story archs to explore. My only concern would be the same issue I had with Gotham. There would be no element of drama for the fans if say one of the more iconic characters lives are put in danger because we already know they go on to live in OoT. The best solution around that though is to let them experience the loss of others close to them. So it can still be done.
      Courage is not the absence of fear, it is the ability to overcome it.
    • MORPHRELINK wrote:

      I wouldn't want it to be a very long show anyway but as far as I'm aware the Civil War went on for years. With a world as massive as Hyrule it shouldn't be a problem to fill it to the brim with content and lore. There a re plenty of characters story archs to explore. My only concern would be the same issue I had with Gotham. There would be no element of drama for the fans if say one of the more iconic characters lives are put in danger because we already know they go on to live in OoT. The best solution around that though is to let them experience the loss of others close to them. So it can still be done.
      I don't really mind something with no drama to it as long as it's not cloying and it has tension in it, not the hero easily beats up the bad guy and we know they're going to win or if they just randomly win. I know some people have problems with series with no drama to them but if it's supposed to be a comedy, then that makes sense. I think a comedy Zelda can work even though that's not really its genre but with the melodramatic direction the series is going now and that the series may end up having melodrama due to the franchise's more serious, dark tone, I think it's time for some more humor than it already presents so that it can outweigh the drama. I liked how goofy Wind Waker was.
    • Kokiri Kid wrote:

      Abyss Master wrote:

      Link can be those things, but not as the quiet, brave swordsman that we some might think of him as.
      FTFY

      Did... that really need fixing?

      Abyss Master wrote:

      3. Keep Ganondorf as the villain and make him a constant, looming but unseen threat.
      Assuming we're following game canon, this isn't really possible (unless you do the same ass-pull FSA did), as there is only one Ganondorf, and we see what happens to him in all timelines, leaving no room for him to reappear in human form.

      There's no rule stating that there can only be one Ganondorf. Indeed, the idea of a reincarnation makes more sense for Ganondorf than for any other character in the whole series, as he is himself a reincarnation of Demise.

      So how it's an "ass-pull" in FSA or wouldn't be possible within the canon, is frankly beyond my understanding.

      As for making him an Ozai-style unseen looming threat, somehow, I just don't see that working. I guess we've seen him in action too much already. That said, I suppose you could pull it off by giving him a role similar to the one he has in TP, minus the overused and, in all cases but this one, largely unearned Hijacked by Ganon trope.

      Adaptations are not made purely for fans though. The intent is also to draw in a new audience that may not be as familiar with the source material. And even for fans, it might be pretty cool to see this alternate take on a villain we are familiar with.

      Every adaptation takes care to set up their characters, even if they're really well-known. Zelda would be no different in this regard.
    • Abyss Master wrote:

      Did... that really need fixing?
      My point is that not everyone sees Link as a silent badass. I know I don't.

      Abyss Master wrote:

      There's no rule stating that there can only be one Ganondorf. Indeed, the idea of a reincarnation makes more sense for Ganondorf than for any other character in the whole series, as he is himself a reincarnation of Demise.
      Ganon being a reincarnation of Demise is far from fact. While I do believe it was the intention, Nintendo not being known for subtle storytelling, but I much prefer Demise's Curse being ambiguous and left for fans to interpret, as there are quite a few possible interpretations and this is by far the least interesting one.

      As for Ganondorf not reincarnating in general, while there's technically nothing in canon forbidding it, it would be really weird if he could, given he's fought tons of Links and Zeldas without ever reincarnating himself. Besides, what would be the point? Why not get a new villain? If you really want to bring back human Ganon, though, I suppose you could do this:

      wildecastor wrote:

      Also, I've always liked the idea of, after a long period of madness, Ganon gains the Triforce of Wisdom or something and is granted his old memories, restoring 'Ganondorf' so to speak.. who wakes to this sombering view of just how far he's fallen from grace. I once had the idea of an open world that plays out something like Majora's Mask, focused on individual characters and their stories in a cursed land... and Ganon himself wanders around the map as a sort of shade that you initially have to hide and escape from when you meet him in the overworld. And as you progress through a series of linear main story progression points, you grow stronger and are able to beat him back. For most the game, you wouldn't know Ganon's deal, until you find out he was on a similar quest as BotW Link gathering fragments of his own past memories. Ganon would rediscover himself... and it wouldn't change a damn thing. Tragically so, and the game would treat it as such. The mad beast was gone, but the King of Evil was back.


      Abyss Master wrote:

      Adaptations are not made purely for fans though. The intent is also to draw in a new audience that may not be as familiar with the source material. And even for fans, it might be pretty cool to see this alternate take on a villain we are familiar with.
      I'm not saying Ganon shouldn't have a such a role because we've seen him extensively. It was more of a gut instinct I was trying to rationalize.
      The Twilight Realm was basically wizard Australia where every naughty banished person was transformed into some sort of harmless albino penguins.
      ~ Gamtos

      WW is Nintendo's Up, basically. Link is Russell, Tetra is Doug, and uh, I guess maybe Tingle is Kevin?

      ~ Gregarious Tree
    • Abyss Master wrote:

      Zelda has plenty of storytelling potential, in the hands of someone who knows what they're doing and is both able and willing to make necessary changes.


      1. No game should be the basis for the story.

      Even the game I consider to have the single best story in the series - Ocarina of Time - would make for an underwhelming story in a TV series if no changes were made to it. The majority of the time spent in the games is either in the overworld, traversing the landscape, or in the dungeons - not exactly the most exciting stuff. But a TV series wouldn't even have to deal with dungeons at all, or be confined by any of the conventions of the games, so it shouldn't be chained to any of the games at all.


      2. The mythos of the series should be faithful to the games, easy to grasp, and should be centered around the Triforce.

      Three goddesses created Hyrule and left behind a piece of their power called the Triforce. People want the Triforce because it can grant any wish. Should evil claim it, turmoil will befall the world. There, that's your basis for compelling conflict. Now you can chock the story full of compelling characters who might seek out the Triforce for their own purposes, not just villains like Ganondorf but also those who might want the Triforce for other reasons; a selfish rogue wanting riches, a desperate traveller seeking to save a deathly ill loved one, there are plenty of things you can do to center the story around the Triforce in a way that is not just true to the series but also makes it easy for us to quickly get a sense of what different characters want and how they might come into conflict. Plenty of room for character growth too - some might realize that pursuing the Triforce for selfish reasons is not the way, while others might be fully consumed by their desire to have their deepest wish granted.


      3. Keep Ganondorf as the villain and make him a constant, looming but unseen threat.

      One of the most compelling parts of Ocarina of Time was in how well the game handled its antagonist, and it's something the TV series can utilize as well. However, it can add even more to the story by having Ganondorf be an ever-present threat that keeps being referred to and referenced at various turns in the story, but never showing his face - at most appearing as a silhouette, or with his back turned, or seen riding through flames on his big black horse with his red cape flowing ominously (that was a good look for him in Ocarina of Time, I say keep it in). It'd be a bit like the way Fire Lord Ozai was done in Avatar: The Last Airbender up to the final season. And of course, you have to end the series by having Ganondorf transform into Ganon. You have to.


      4. Have Link as the protagonist if you must, but do not make him a stoic and do not make him travel alone.

      Whoever is the protagonist needs to be relatable. Preferably the most relatable of all the characters, but at the very least relatable enough. Likable too. Link can be those things, but not as the quiet, brave swordsman that we might think of him as. If it becomes too difficult to see Link as anything else, no biggie; just change the protagonist. Make it princess Zelda if need be. Whoever it is, needs companions to travel with. Also, the protagonist should have their own reasons for seeking the Triforce, and they should be the ones we cheer on the most to get it.
      I'm not trying to sound like a broken record, but it's Zelda. I really don't see how Link of all things can not be in the show. Whether people consider him important or not, he's objectively important.

      Sorry for the random tanget, I just don't get this.