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    Forest Architects
    • Forest architecture. We'll come back to this. From Architecture in Zelda.

      In Breath of the Wild, the latest game in the timeline, Koroks are treated as forest spirits. Their architectural endeavors consist of places rocks in circles and other simple patterns and stacking metal blocks on top of each other. The only exception is the current Deku Tree, whose interior has been carved to form a tunnel and several rooms. (Even that may have been done by the Deku Tree himself, rather than the Koroks.)

      On the other hand, the Koroks are rather adept at making weapons, if not using them. The Forest Dweller’s Sword, Spear, Bow, and Shield are all said to be made by Koroks for Hylians. Only the boomerang is said to have originally been used by the Koroks themselves, though we don’t see any modern Koroks using those.

      Hyrule Compendium wrote:

      This throwing weapon was originally used by the forest-dwelling Koroks. It's unique shape allows it to return after being thrown.
      The Koroks in Wind Waker – the next-latest game in which they appear – are in much the same state. They plant trees, and seem to have no interest in building anything, large or small. Even Makar’s violin is implied to be passed down from previous generations. Here there is another exception in the potion shop, which looks to deliberately and specifically carved out. Even the potion shop has little furniture, the most impressive being what looks like a poster on the wall.


      Korok architecture. Rare and simplistic. From Zelda Wiki

      Nearby, stands the Forbidden Woods. The Koroks claim to have lived here once.

      A Korok wrote:

      The Forbidden Woods were once our home. They were peaceful back then. I would guess that our homes should still exist somewhere deep within the woods. If you have trouble anywhere in the forest, just look for the stump-shaped houses.

      A stump-shaped house. Image from this random person's tumblr

      Aside from those stump-shaped houses, the Forbidden Woods is still largely naturalistic – a tangle of trees and branches with natural-looking animals throughout -- but evidence of civilization can still be found. Most doors feature the Kokiri Emblem. Complex contraptions have been put into place which can only be controlled by manipulation of wind – achieved by the Deku Leaf. Other than being forests, there is little similarity between this Forbidden Woods and the Forest Haven or Korok Forest of BotW. But a single boomerang can be found here, perhaps made and used by Koroks as the Hyrule Compendium entry claims.

      However, the Koroks themselves never use the Kokiri Emblem. It makes no appearance in their current home, the Forest Haven. Nor do the Koroks live in stump-shaped houses anymore, nor do they presently use boomerangs. But the Koroks were once Kokiri, and the Kokiri are no strangers to such things.

      In OoT, the Kokiri live in stump-shaped houses, and they use the Kokiri Emblem on their shields. Their village, though trite by Hylian standards, contains bridges, fences, a variety of furniture, and other constructed items. It doesn’t take an in-depth analysis to conclude that it was the Kokiri, rather than the Koroks, who once lived in the Forbidden Woods.

      But upon closer inspection, it is apparent that even the Kokiri we see in OoT did not construct their own village. If adult-sized doors in a village full of children aren’t evidence enough, the fact that the shopkeeper has to hop to see over his own counter is.


      Kokiri architecture. Not very effective.

      Kokiri Village was built with adults in mind. However, like the Koroks, the Kokiri likely make their own shields, as the Kokiri Shield is designed exclusively for children.

      A Kokiri wrote:

      Hi, mister! You can't use a Deku Shield! It's only for kids!
      The interior of the Deku Tree suggests an even more ambitious past. Consisting of both the inside of the Deku Tree itself, as well as some natural underground caverns with a artificial additions, the structure contains a room with a metal trap and adjustable water level, among other things. While much of this structure could possibly have been produced by the Deku Tree himself, those two elements in particular suggest the participation of some other metalworking people in the construction process. Considering that the Deku Tree holds the Spiritual Stone of Forest, it is possible that he and the structure within him date all the way back to the sealing of the Sacred Realm at the end of the Era of Chaos.

      Which leads us at last to the TP Forest Temple. It has a lot in common with the architecture we've already seen. The Kokiri Emblem appears on the doors, and once again, we find that wind control is necessary to navigate the temple, both aspects in common with the Forbidden Forest. The way it built into the trees is reminiscent of the stump-houses of the Kokiri, and the rare metal that appears is reminiscent of the Great Deku Tree. Seemingly decorative designs here are also found in a cave on the southern edge of the Eldin Province, near Faron, suggesting that whatever culture produced this temple in the branches was comfortable digging among roots as well, once again reminiscent of the Great Deku Tree and the cavern beneath him. The presence of a Fused Shadow quite likely dates the structure or the people who built it to the end of the Interloper War, commonly believed in the theorizing community to have occurred during the Era of Chaos.


      The Kokiri Emblem on a door.

      A boomerang is found in the Forest Temple, the Gale Boomerang. It has the ability to target multiple places or enemies, even moving targets, and then fly around on clearly unnatural paths to hit them all in the proper order. The only other boomerang with this particular ability is the one in WW, which when brought to BotW via amiibo, is even called the Sea Breeze Boomerang. Breeze, Gale, wind. (Though it's worth noticing that it functions identically to any other boomerang in BotW, travelling only in a single arc.)

      It is apparent that the Forest Temple, Forbidden Woods, Great Deku Tree and Kokiri Village all stem from the same architectural tradition, and that the Koroks and Kokiri themselves, at least the ones we see, are not responsible. So what we’re looking for is a group of people who
      • Carved their structures into pre-existing trees and underground caverns, much like the rare Korok structures we see.
      • Were quite advanced in terms of construction and mechanics
      • Had similar size and proportion to adult humans.
      • Lived around the time of the Era of Chaos and the founding of Hyrule Kingdom.
      • Were significant enough on the world stage to merit being trusted with both a Fused Shadow and a Spirital Stone.
      • Vanished sometime before Ocarina of Time, leaving the Kokiri to inhabit their village, and their temple unoccupied.
      That’s the question. Here’s one answer. A group of people, probably humans, came to prominence early in Hyrule's history, living in the forests and building in their own style. They put into place a few grand structures and several smaller ones before being stricken by some unknown tragedy and either dying out or moving away from Hyrule, never to be seen in-game. Some time later, the Koroks, a group of forest spirits, took on human form – possibly for the purpose of raising the Hero of Time – and moved into a village left behind by these people. When that task was done, they retained humanoid form until Hyrule was flooded and life as a human child became impractical. At that time, they reverted to Korok form.

      Another answer begins very similarly. A group of people, certainly Hylians, came to prominence early in Hyrule's history, living in the forests of Hyrule and building in their own style. They put into place a few grand structures and several smaller ones before being stricken by some unknown tragedy. The adults vanished entirely, probably dead, but the children survived to become the Kokiri we see in Ocarina of Time. They were saved by the Deku Tree, the guardian deity of their people, and continued to live in the village until the Hyrule was flooded and life as a human child became impractical. At that time, they took on Korok form.

      The difference, of course, is whether the Kokiri began as Koroks or as Hylians. While both of these scenarios are plausible, and the former does have a certain appeal, there are two pieces of information that point toward the latter. First, the Kokiri's Emerald held by the Great Deku Tree shares its name with the Kokiri people, and its shape with the design on the doors of the Forest Temple and Forbidden Woods. If the Goron’s Ruby and Zora’s Sapphire are any indication, the stones’ names comes from the races entrusted with them, so these forest architects were probably known as Kokiri. Second, the Kokiri Shield also bears the symbol used by the forest architects. Why would the Kokiri adopt someone else’s name and symbol as their own? Either the Kokiri are descended from the original forest architects, or they are actively impersonating them.

      In a happy coincidence, Hyrule Encyclopedia also supports this conclusion:

      Hyrule Encyclopedia p. 50 wrote:

      In truth, the Kokiri are also Hylians. They trace their roots back to a time when the Hylians were first developing their civilization, building cities and relying on a less natural way of life. The Kokiri decided to distance themselves from the Hylians, exiling themselves to the forest to make their own way of life closer to nature.
      I’m not saying that HE should or should not be considered canon, nor that it’s right about everything. But I am saying that it’s probably right about this.

      Thanks to @Reign for obtaining information and quotes from Hyrule Encyclopedia, and providing feedback on the theory.
      Goddess of the Sands

      Map of Thyphlo Ruins

      Forest Architects

      If you have Amiibo Tap: Nintendo's Greatest Bits on Wii U, you can reset which games your amiibo unlock by deleting the game and then redownloading it.
    • Is it possible that the Great Deku Tree created all these structures himself or at least some of them?

      We've seen in Ocarina of Time that the GDT is capable of some form of movement as shown when he opens his mouth to let Link in to defeat Gohma.

      He also has a very intricate interior that was clearly artificially constructed. There's no way those torch beams, door ways, and metal bars are naturally occurring.

      I also wonder about the deku scrubs and if they played a hand in some of the building.
      I know they have their kingdom in Majora's Mask, sometimes have hands, and are capable of growing in size up to that of a normal human. So I could see them as a candidate as well.
      Courage is not the absence of fear, it is the ability to overcome it.
    • MORPHRELINK wrote:

      Is it possible that the Great Deku Tree created all these structures himself or at least some of them?
      As far as external structures go, I think we see the full range of Deku Tree motion in Wind Waker. He can move around, but can't shake a bunch of Chuchus off his face. He can free a leaf from his branches, but then it gets stuck and he needs Link to go and fetch it. So I'm reasonably certain that something like those platforms in the first picture are beyond the Deku Tree's ability to construct directly.

      For internal structures, I don't really have a reason to say that it couldn't happen. It's not hard to imagine the Great Deku Tree carefully controlling his own growth, perhaps over decades or even centuries, to create rooms and platforms inside himself. There are still a few things that probably would have to be installed or at least delivered by an outside force, like those metal bars you mentioned.

      MORPHRELINK wrote:

      I also wonder about the deku scrubs and if they played a hand in some of the building.
      I know they have their kingdom in Majora's Mask, sometimes have hands, and are capable of growing in size up to that of a normal human. So I could see them as a candidate as well.
      To be honest, I completely overlooked Deku Scrubs as a candidate. There are at least four of them inside the Great Deku Tree himself, and they are quite prevalent in the Lost Woods. In fact, one of them lives in a tree, and just going by memory, most business scrubs around Hyrule are found underground.

      On the other hand, the Dekus in MM don't employ the same architecture at all. Woodfall Temple seems to be mostly stone, and the Deku Palace is built like a wooden fort.



      Weirdly, that's the sort of design I would expect from people weren't at home in the forest.

      They also run into a similar problem with the Kokiri's Emerald -- if they were the ones originally associated with it, it would probably be called the Deku's Emerald and the Kokiri wouldn't put a sketch of it on their shields.

      I still favor Hylians, but Deku Scrubs could work.
      Goddess of the Sands

      Map of Thyphlo Ruins

      Forest Architects

      If you have Amiibo Tap: Nintendo's Greatest Bits on Wii U, you can reset which games your amiibo unlock by deleting the game and then redownloading it.
    • I agree in the major part ….

      For The Wind Waker, the forbidden woods were once the home of the Koroks before Ganon sent Kale Demos, we don't when did this happened, but since the koroks doesn't think much about it, I think this was long ago, during the time he killed the two sages.
      In that time, it's possible that Koroks were still kokiris living in that island and that the Deku Tree transformed them after the event.



      Evran_Speer wrote:

      A group of people, probably humans, came to prominence early in Hyrule's history, living in the forests and building in their own style.

      Those who made the Skyview Temple, the humans that the Dragon Faron was talking about ?
      They were probably sent in the sky with the other humans.


      Evran_Speer wrote:

      The difference, of course, is whether the Kokiri began as Koroks or as Hylians.

      Are you forgetting the Kikwis ?
      Here's my proofs why the Kikwis are the ancestor of the Kokiris and Koroks.

      "Hmm... Fascinating! Should this actually be classified as flora or fauna... I mean, plant or animal?" — Owlan

      Owlan can't tells if they are animals or plants.
      Like the koroks, the Kikwis are asexual.
      Bucha looks like the Deku Tree.
      In the French localization he is referred as "le vénérable" which was the title of the Great Deku Tree, "le vénérable Arbre Mojo", but I don't know about this in JP.
      Like the Deku Tree, Bucha is the father figure of the Kikwis.
      Yerbal is older than Bucha but he have a regular size, so, Bucha size didn't came from his age but from his status as the chief.

      Another thing from Yerbal, he chose to live alone on the Great Tree(the name again) ….
      My theory is that Yerbal is from the previous generation, since Kikwis are asexual, their reproduction must occured differently, I think it's just like the Deku Tree, there is a "bee queen" that make new individuals, Bucha is this one for the kikwis, but before Bucha, there was a previous one, and this one was the father of Yerbal, but he died from aging, and since they are both animals and plants, only the animal part passed away leaving only the plant that grow to be the Great Tree.

      That's why the Kikwis should be the ancestor of the Kokiris/Koroks.
    • Nonoctoro wrote:

      For The Wind Waker, the forbidden woods were once the home of the Koroks before Ganon sent Kale Demos, we don't when did this happened, but since the koroks doesn't think much about it, I think this was long ago, during the time he killed the two sages.
      Do we know for sure it was when Ganon sent Kalle Demos? It makes sense, but I don't recall it ever being stated specifically.

      Nonoctoro wrote:

      Those who made the Skyview Temple, the humans that the Dragon Faron was talking about ?
      Probably not those ones. The architectural style of Skyview Temple is entirely different, being a building built in the forest instead of being carved from the forest. I don't have a great grasp on the architecture of Skyward Sword, but my understanding is that Skyview Temple was probably constructed by the same people who built at least a couple of the other dungeons in that game. (The Fire Sanctuary comes to mind, in particular.)

      The forest architects I'm talking about probably appeared sometime after Skyward Sword, but it's possible that that existed before SS and simply went unseen and unknown until after that. I personally find it hard to believe that no humans existed at all on the surface of Hyrule's whole planet during that time, but maybe that's just my bias.

      Nonoctoro wrote:

      Are you forgetting the Kikwis ?
      More ignoring than forgetting. Kikwi->Kokiri->Korok can be seen as a variation of Korok->Kokiri->Korok, in that the Kokiri arise from forest-dwellers without much inclination toward architecture rather than from Hylians. I think Hylian->Kokiri->Korok is more likely based on the architectural evidence above.

      Some additional thoughts on the Kikwi, though. There are similarities between Kikwi and Kokiri/Koroks; they live in the forest, they sort of hide, and they seem rather childish. But the differences shouldn't be overlooked. Koroks are explicitly identified as spirits, and Kokiri display at least some traits of spirits -- turning invisible and apparently being able to change their form (though we never actually see that; we're only told about it in WW). Kikwi are pretty terrible at hiding, and they seem to be entirely physical beings.

      Other things, like Yerbal looking like the Great Deku Tree, are probably out-of-universe references to OoT, but it doesn't amount to much solid proof in-universe.

      How do you know Kikwi are asexual? Also, if one of the Kikwi became the Faron Great Tree, would you say that the other massively large trees (several stumps and fallen trees are found around BotW's Hyrule, for example) grow from dead Koroks?
      Goddess of the Sands

      Map of Thyphlo Ruins

      Forest Architects

      If you have Amiibo Tap: Nintendo's Greatest Bits on Wii U, you can reset which games your amiibo unlock by deleting the game and then redownloading it.
    • Interesting theory. Loved it.

      Some questions:


      Evran_Speer wrote:

      But upon closer inspection, it is apparent that even the Kokiri we see in OoT did not construct their own village. If adult-sized doors in a village full of children aren’t evidence enough, the fact that the shopkeeper has to hop to see over his own counter is.
      So, do you think the Kokiri can maintain all this stuff made for and by adults?
      Especially if the Kokiri already have lived some years prior to the arrival of Link and his mother and do continue to live there after Adult Link's time... That's what?, at least 3 + (9 or 10) + 7 + 3 = 22 or 23 years. And this is a conservative estimate!

      Also, yeah, the hopping shopkeeper always caught my attention since I'm a child! XD

      I have to say, I personally tend towards the second option: That it's Hylian -> Kokiri -> Korok.

      Evran_Speer wrote:

      Kokiri display at least some traits of spirits -- turning invisible
      So, this is canon? Always thought this was due to the N64's limitations, but it is there in the 3DS version as well...
      "A puppet that can no longer be used is mere garbage.
      This puppet's role has just ended..."
      - Majora


      My major theories:

      Counting the Population of Termina

      Counting the Population of Hyrule (OoT)
    • Any thoughts on the Kokiri's sword? The Kokiri talk about it being their "treasure" but none of the kids seem to hint at where it came from. It's implied that the Kokiri don't bother with weapons because the GDT has always protected them.

      I know it's implied that the sword was made specifically for the Kokiri. And I believe there are only two in existence that I am aware of. (Assuming the Kokiri sword is an entirely different one in MM than its OoT counter part.)

      Also, I wonder if Link returned the upgraded "Gilded Sword" to the Kokiri when he returned from Termina.
      Courage is not the absence of fear, it is the ability to overcome it.
    • Romano-British Medli wrote:

      So, do you think the Kokiri can maintain all this stuff made for and by adults?
      Well, they could do smaller cleaning tasks, sweeping and stuff, pretty easily. If one of their houses had a roof caved in or something, they would probably just have to put up with it. But they do have the Deku Tree's protection and the Kokiri Forest is filled with magic-looking little sparkles, so maybe trees don't decay there as quickly as they would in the rest of the world. Then the Kokiri could live in peace there until some kind of disaster struck (i.e. a giant flood) before they had to try something different.

      Romano-British Medli wrote:

      So, this is canon? Always thought this was due to the N64's limitations, but it is there in the 3DS version as well...
      From what I've heard, it does originate with the N64's limitations, but I think it should be taken as canon anyway, mostly because of this scene: youtube.com/watch?v=V-poU2a9AGc

      Link runs right past Saria while she's invisible, and then she appears just before speaking and he looks surprised for a second. That scene wouldn't make as much as if Saria was canonically just standing there in plain sight the whole time.

      MORPHRELINK wrote:

      Any thoughts on the Kokiri's sword?
      I'm not sure about the Kokiri Sword. It's weird that it's held in such high esteem by the Kokiri, who never actually use it. The proto-Kokiri Hylians did incorporate metal into their designs, so metal swords aren't out of the question, but for all we know, it could have been left behind by some traveler years later who didn't make it out of the forest.

      I've always assumed that it was the same sword in OoT and MM, and had just received some nominal upgrade that made it look a bit different. Now that I think about it, though, I guess he was just borrowing the one in OoT; it would make sense if he returned that one and received a new one somehow. Maybe it was a gift from Zelda and simply modeled after his original sword.

      Basically, we don't have enough information to reach any firm conclusions about the Kokiri Sword(s).
      Goddess of the Sands

      Map of Thyphlo Ruins

      Forest Architects

      If you have Amiibo Tap: Nintendo's Greatest Bits on Wii U, you can reset which games your amiibo unlock by deleting the game and then redownloading it.
    • Evran_Speer wrote:

      Link runs right past Saria while she's invisible, and then she appears just before speaking and he looks surprised for a second. That scene wouldn't make as much as if Saria was canonically just standing there in plain sight the whole time.

      I always took that scene as an artistic way of expressing Link's urgency when leaving the forest. As if to say he was so focused on the goal the GDT gave him before his passing that he hadn't really noticed anyone or anything else around him in his rush to leave.
      Courage is not the absence of fear, it is the ability to overcome it.
    • @MORPHRELINK That's possible, it just seems less likely to me. Probably the most important person in his life to that point is standing right in front of him on the bridge and he just doesn't notice her? Again, it's possible -- his thoughts are obviously elsewhere -- but it makes more sense if she's particularly difficult to see. The fact that she appears right as she begins speaking also strikes me as deliberate.
      Goddess of the Sands

      Map of Thyphlo Ruins

      Forest Architects

      If you have Amiibo Tap: Nintendo's Greatest Bits on Wii U, you can reset which games your amiibo unlock by deleting the game and then redownloading it.
    • The thing is, Her fairy is noticeably visible. Indicating she was there all along. I would also find it odd that they have fairy companions if they themselves were spirits. Since fairy's are considered the spirits of the forest as well I would find it redundant.

      The other thing I would attribute this to is the thick hazey fog that is ever present throughout the lost woods and Kokiri forest. I suppose it's possible the Kokiri developed a natural means of camouflage making it difficult for predators or hunters to see them at a distance.
      Courage is not the absence of fear, it is the ability to overcome it.
    • I specifically had the possibility of decaying and crumbling building material in mind, as time passes...

      Evran_Speer wrote:

      But they do have the Deku Tree's protection and the Kokiri Forest is filled with magic-looking little sparkles, so maybe trees don't decay there as quickly as they would in the rest of the world.
      Good point! Didn't think about that! Yes, this could definitively work! This answers my question, then - I'm totally fine with this headcanon!



      Evran_Speer wrote:

      From what I've heard, it does originate with the N64's limitations, but I think it should be taken as canon anyway, mostly because of this scene: [Youtube Link]


      Link runs right past Saria while she's invisible, and then she appears just before speaking and he looks surprised for a second. That scene wouldn't make as much as if Saria was canonically just standing there in plain sight the whole time.
      Totally forgot Link runs PAST Saria! Hm, this kind of makes sense, but @MORPHRELINK also has a point. However, the bridge is more narrow than wide, maybe spanning 2 or 2.5 meters at most, I'd estimate. Even if Link is in a hurry, it's REALLY hard to overlook Saria standing there! Using fog as cover, on the other hand, still makes this kind of a possibility, I guess...? I can't really decide on this...



      About the Kokiri Sword:

      Evran_Speer wrote:

      I'm not sure about the Kokiri Sword. It's weird that it's held in such high esteem by the Kokiri, who never actually use it. The proto-Kokiri Hylians did incorporate metal into their designs, so metal swords aren't out of the question, but for all we know, it could have been left behind by some traveler years later who didn't make it out of the forest.
      In your theory, you directly stated that the Kokiri either are direct descendants of these proto-Kokiri-Hylians, or the Kokiri are impersonating these previous inhabitants. So I'd say it's completely reasonable to assume the Kokiri are worshipping some items/tools the previous people have used. (Maybe Fetishism [meaning: connect inanimate object to spiritual powers or souls] is a thing in Kokiri Spiritualism?)
      I am convinced and confident we can tie the Kokiri Sword to your theory in a plausibe way.
      "A puppet that can no longer be used is mere garbage.
      This puppet's role has just ended..."
      - Majora


      My major theories:

      Counting the Population of Termina

      Counting the Population of Hyrule (OoT)

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Romano-British Medli ().

    • We do know that the magic of the Lost Woods has a transformative/corrupting effects on its inhabitants - it's mentioned in OoT that those who become lost in it become Skull Kids or Stalfos, and in FSA, Deku Scrubs. And it's directly adjacent to Kokiri Forest, which is implied to be a sort of sanctuary/safe place to withstand the influence of its magic, likely due to the presence of the Great Deku tree. Even so, Kokiri Forest is bathed in magic, and has its share of monsters and dangers.

      If we're going by the Kokiri descendants idea, I'd be willing to bet that maybe they were transformed and changed over time by the magic of the Lost Woods, protected and safeguarded by the GDT. Maybe he couldn't protect them whole cloth, but he could at least ensure they weren't turned into monsters, or their children strange and ethereal creatures. But that influence is inescapable and caused them to turn into the Kokiri over time.

      This same theme of falling from greatness, or dramatic changes through the ages is also present in several other areas, like the lore behind the Ooccoo of TP, and ancient Hyrule in BotW. I'd say it's a pretty safe thematic conclusion to make, but we'd have to look at other potential ideas and concepts.
      I AM TAKANUVA, TOA OF LIGHT!

      You'll be hearing my name someday, whenever people talk about heroes - Takua!
    • Romano-British Medli wrote:

      In your theory, you directly stated that the Kokiri either are direct descendants of these proto-Kokiri-Hylians, or the Kokiri are impersonating these previous inhabitants. So I'd say it's completely reasonable to assume the Kokiri are worshipping some items/tools the previous people have used.
      That's a good point. It makes sense that they would have a lot of respect for those who came before them, especially as regards the Kokiri Sword, since the Kokiri don't seem to make or use weapons. If it had just been left by some unknown traveler like I suggested as an alternative, they probably wouldn't care about it that much. So, no argument here.

      @Takanuva That makes a lot of sense, too. I suspect that the Great Deku is largely responsible for the existence of the Lost Woods in the first place, so it makes sense that he would be able to transform the Kokiri in a different way. Like you said, that probably involves separating Kokiri Forest from the Lost Woods and filling it with a different kind of magic.

      It's interesting that in FSA, people turned into Deku Scrubs instead of Stalfos in the Lost Woods. I'd read that before, but completely forgot about it. They also seem to have been restricted from leaving the forest, as the celebrate the spreading of Lost Woods allowing them to travel all over Hyrule (as per Zelda wiki, at least). This might be a stretch, but maybe that was the case once before, and the Deku Scrubs we see in OoT were once human. That would have interesting repercussions.
      Goddess of the Sands

      Map of Thyphlo Ruins

      Forest Architects

      If you have Amiibo Tap: Nintendo's Greatest Bits on Wii U, you can reset which games your amiibo unlock by deleting the game and then redownloading it.
    • Architecture of Zelda wrote:


      The oddest image to be found in the HD remake. This carving, only found upon the lower part of the wooden pathways of the Forest Temple - well out of sight - seems to depict a butterfly or moth, with a skull at its base, below which hovers an inverted Triforce. The inverted Triforce is usually a symbol connected to the Kingdom of Lorule, though it can also be seen as a perversion of that which was left by the Three Golden Goddesses. To find it here, in a Hyrulean temple, is most strange.
      :dazed:
      "Who does not want to think is a fanatic, who cannot think is an idiot, who does not dare to think is a coward." -Sir Francis Bacon-

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Ginko ().

    • fascinating, so the true reason why the Kokiri left their home is because of Mothula from another world bringing death upon them. Of course ... :cookiemonster:

      I could agree that the inverted Triforce means "corruption of the Triforce" and that Mothula represent the monsters that have attacked them, some of the Ganon's minions.
      Or maybe this is about the Death of the Deku Tree, that insect thing being Gohma.
      Or that the Deku Sprout was also Killed by Ganondorf after he sent a Mothula at him.

      We have not enough stuff at hand to say anything tho.