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    The Creators' Retreat: Here Be Artsy Nerds
    • So in my World Music class, we're about to start working on our last paper, which is a simplified autoethnography, and to get us thinking along those lines, we had to write a ~600-word piece that relates one of the metaphors we used in our previous paper to our lives. The original metaphor I repurposed was "Japanese Music as Time Capsule." The result blew my mind when I read the whole thing after I was done. I guess I can still surprise myself when I write something fairly deep while feeling extremely exhausted and only half-paying attention to what I'm doing.

      Autoethnography Exploration

      Autoethnography Exploration: Memories as Time Capsules


      I often think about where I have been. I am a profoundly nostalgic person. I still listen to CDs on a semi-regular basis, and I still occasionally make and listen to mixtapes on actual cassettes. I often take time to revisit computer files that I created as early as 2002. And at some point each day, I lie in bed and swim through my memories, both recent and distant. Those memories shape my present.

      I sadly still experience post-traumatic stress from my time in public elementary and middle school. Almost every night, I dream of being back in the halls of one of those places, and my teachers and my peers persecute me for things beyond my control. During those dreams, I experience a familiar dread from a decade ago. That dread reminds me, time and time again, two critical things: 1) the U.S. education system is broken, particularly for people who learn differently than did the people who shape it, and 2) always be kind to children. I live by that second point today. Even when I come across a child who misbehaves, I do not lash out at the child; anger engenders fear, fear engenders resentment, and resentment makes one bitter. I have known bitterness for more than a decade, and I would not wish it on anyone.

      I do have many happy memories, though, which is probably why I am generally upbeat. When I am sad, I often recall a moment at sleepaway camp in 2009, when I was fourteen. At that time, I was having difficulty connecting with my peers because I was quiet and shy and I shared few interests with them. One night, at a campout, I read my bunkmates one of my short stories. After that night, at least for a week or so, I noticed that my peers expressed more interest in me in general, and I began to feel as though they wanted to get to know me better. This was especially evident in the moment imprinted on my mind as one of the happiest of my life. A couple of days after the campout, we were all waiting for an activity to be set up, and most of my bunkmates were playing with a ball or a Frisbee at the bottom of the hill atop which sat our cabin. I was sitting about halfway up the hill, reading a book by myself. At one point, I looked up from my book at the group of boys laughing and having fun. In that instant, I caught the eye of one of them, and then something magical happened: that boy stopped playing and started running towards me. The others caught on almost immediately, and they all followed the first kid. I remember it clearly: their beaming faces; their kind laughter; their grip on my arm as they pulled me onto my feet, down the hill, and into their throng; and a sense of acceptance, belonging, and worth so profound that I believe I would be hard-pressed to experience such a feeling again in my lifetime.

      My past is just memories, and my memories are my past. My memories are bundled up in my brain as scattered sequences of chemicals and electrical impulses, accessible at my whim. I learn from them every day, almost as much as I learn from the present, and I use the lessons from my experiences to mold my moral code and dictate my actions. Historians learn from the past through secondary and tertiary sources; I learn from my past directly, for I have lived it.
    • Oh, and in case you missed it because I unintentionally bumped the original announcement back a page in here, we are starting sign-ups for a brand-new special event! We at the Creative Corner are teaming up with @Ruki and @epixtar over in the Role Play Guild for an unprecedented collaborative competition! For details, check out the information thread. Sign-ups will last all of November, and the event will take place throughout December.

      Disclaimer: It's not actually a tournament—there are no brackets involved—but "Tournament" sounds cool, wouldn't you say?

      EDIT: Important detail I should mention: there's an actual prize for winning, like one with monetary value. Like a video game of your choice on Steam worth up to $20!

      The post was edited 1 time, last by EzloSpirit ().

    • Hey, so NaNoWriMo is back on again this year, and I'm going to be taking advantage of it to write an original story I've had on the back burner for a while (not my first choice, but with my fanfic frozen in planning limbo, progress there is limited).

      While working today, I got into a discussion with my boss about potential massive projects that humanity could potentially undertake. We had some back and forth about the viability of one such project, and accidentally came up with a setting for a story. I can't use it myself since, as I said above, I have my own projects to work on, but I'm happy to share the idea to anyone willing to utilise it.

      Display Spoiler

      The United States of America and the Russian Federation come together in order to complete a massive project, to create the Bering Strait crossing and link the two Continents to facilitate easy and swift overland trade.

      Stretching over 100km (60 miles), the bridge is the longest in the world. Because of the frigid conditions, a permanent construction crew is required to be onsite to repair all damage to the bridge, lest the project fail, so structures to house the various construction crews are built onto the bridge. As time passes, the families of the construction crews begin to set up shops to provide amenities lacking to make living there easier for everyone. That gave rise to trade, law enforcement, and eventually a political base.

      Soon, the bridge becomes a small city, with it's own laws and distinct culture that's a blend of American and Russian influences. Both countries share equal claim to the city, but neither wants to challenge the other's claim, turning into a pseudo-independent city-state that controls trade between two of the most powerful continents in the world.


      Feel free to change any aspect of the setting if you want to. Change the time period to post-apocalypse earth, have America control the parts of Russia where the bridge is built after a war, move the location to connect Australia to South-East Asia, I don't mind. Just let me know if you use it :)
    • Finally got around to posting the latest Writing Contest results. >.>

      Our winner was first-time entrant @GregariousTree, who blew us all away with his haunting poem! Check it out:

      The Right Hand by GregariousTree
      Yellow is my favorite color
      And always so is gray.

      My hand stained yellow from an earthy treasure.
      My eye waned gray from celestial terror.
      The dime sun cracked when it faded laughing.
      And Hunger hid from view.

      He tied a string from hand to foot
      And set me marching in my line.
      I climbed a tree and soaked up rain
      And knew that everything was fine.

      I'd like to say the villainy of time explains my death,
      But evil is so rarely bad and grievance makes no case.
      What villain does not hate the hero's efforts to protect?
      All shame is mine to bear

      alone.
      When time had come to make a choice:
      The yellow hand, the graying eye?
      Remembering old Ezra's book,
      I plucked the gray and kept the tie.

      I'm haunted now by dreams of the right hand.
      A macabre trophy of imagined dignity
      Strung along behind, still
      Twiching, grasping at straws underfoot.
      I kept it only, now I see, because I would not crawl.

      Gray is always my favorite color,
      But yellow gets to stay.
    • I just realized something...

      In ‘Harry Potter’, Harry grows up and has a difficult time with his son.

      In ‘Avatar: The Last Airbender’, Aang grows up and winds up neglecting two of his three children because those two weren’t Airbenders like he was.

      In ‘Star Wars’, Han and Leia have a son and, well, we know how that turned out.

      If, decades down the road, assuming I ever publish ‘The Alkorian Legends’, I write a story about a much older Mishu, I promise I won’t make her a bad mother who either neglects her kids or ends up with one that becomes crazy-evil. Seriously, what’s with that trend of heroes growing up to be either bad parents or having bad kids?

      What’s next? The next ‘Legend of Zelda’ game being a sequel to ‘Breath of the Wild’ about an adult Link who neglected a child who then became evil and wants to kill him?


      "I'm the King of the Seas!" - Said every Orca Whale Ever

    • I think it's that the hero-ing lifestyle tends to not be a good fit with parenting. In star wars, Leia did a lot of political work and Han kept being Han. In Avatar, Aang's first duty was to the world, and his family would have to be pushed aside.

      I can't speak for Harry Potter, because I refuse to read Cursed Child as I have better things to waste my life on, but his goal in school was to become an Auror, which is dangerous work and I would imagine it would keep him away from home a lot.

      Added to this, all these examples feature heroes that are famous for their achievements, resulting in the "growing up in the parent's shadow" thing that all their children seem to have. My guess that this 'trend' is the result of writers trying to explain the realistic familial situations that would arise from having a hero as a parent.



      Also, I don't think Link's child would turn evil just from Link being a lousy father. They'd probably become evil from a combination of never meeting expectations and everyone telling them that they'll never be as great as Link, so they decide to do a deal with one of the many demons running around Hyrule in exchange for power :P
    • (All these problems could be solved with some family counseling and good mental health practices, plus maybe taking a year or two away to a place where the hero is unknown so they can go unnoticed and be a child without expectations)
    • Axius27 wrote:

      I think it's that the hero-ing lifestyle tends to not be a good fit with parenting. In star wars, Leia did a lot of political work and Han kept being Han. In Avatar, Aang's first duty was to the world, and his family would have to be pushed aside.

      I can't speak for Harry Potter, because I refuse to read Cursed Child as I have better things to waste my life on, but his goal in school was to become an Auror, which is dangerous work and I would imagine it would keep him away from home a lot.

      Added to this, all these examples feature heroes that are famous for their achievements, resulting in the "growing up in the parent's shadow" thing that all their children seem to have. My guess that this 'trend' is the result of writers trying to explain the realistic familial situations that would arise from having a hero as a parent.



      Also, I don't think Link's child would turn evil just from Link being a lousy father. They'd probably become evil from a combination of never meeting expectations and everyone telling them that they'll never be as great as Link, so they decide to do a deal with one of the many demons running around Hyrule in exchange for power :P
      Harry has trouble with his child because he's always busy and his child has failed all expectations of other people (he's not good at quidditch, he's in slytherin, and I think he's good at potions and bad at DADDA.

      Sig by TruEdge67, Glorious Newbie Overlord
    • The reason I think the heroes are like this (Naruto is one too) is a combination of not having parents so not sure what to do to connect to their children and feeling like they would understand their need to protect everyone. They are so used to putting the whole first because that’s what they’ve been trained to do, they don’t take the time to be selfish.

      And I think children acting out as a result is the reasonable reaction. In Time Lost, Ventus’s father is captain of the Royal Guard and not home much after the war with the Gerudo 10 years prior to the events of OoT/TL. His desire is to see nobody suffer again and works tirelessly to make sure that happens. He has high standards for his two children and while Rini, Ven’s younger sister, resents their father for never being around, Ven buries his resentment down because he hero worships his father and wants to be beloved and a knight just like him.

      Though as the story goes on, the complicated feelings start bubbling up like the crippling lack of self worth Ven has because Kubera never said he was proud of him … to his face, and how a paragon of a man can be a kinda terrible father.

      The sequel goes further into Kubera mindset and the just … sadness of the situation.

      :heart: Rinn “Arwyn” Nailo drawn by Liah :heart:
      Rakshael: if I know one thing about Ruki, it's that she'll prove you wrong just for the sake of saying she did it
      Characters | The Time Lost | The Rumors We Believe | Ruki's Reviews
    • I was just thinking that, @BackSet-Chan. Goku is a terrible father, but Piccolo makes up for it. In Dragonball Super, guess who Gohan and Videl's go-to babysitter is for Pan?

      I guess in fictionland you can have crappy parents, but as long as you have a good parental figure in your life, you'll be okay.


      BotW Zelda in her purple Hylian Tunic, by my husband, DarkSilver.

      "Breath of the Wild: "Zelda's Redemption" Chapter 3 now up!

      After Calamity Ganon's defeat, a devastated Zelda must come to terms with her ruined kingdom, dead friends, and the resentment of the Hero who had saved her, but lost his fiancee. When all hope seems lost, she comes across a legend of a holy relic that can set things right, if she can find the ancient keys to access it. With the help of new friends, and without Link, can Zelda finally become a legend, on her own terms?
    • GamerKitty205 wrote:

      Does anyone have any tips on making book titles that don't sound super lame?
      Along the lines of @Ruki's question, perhaps you could pick a theme or symbol from the book and then look for cool-sounding synonyms in a thesaurus (or if you're feeling modern, Thesaurus.com).

      The post was edited 2 times, last by EzloSpirit ().