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    • ...

      I just watched Krampus. Ummm, I'm not sure what I expected but I definitely didn't expect an actually decent holiday horror movie. It wasn't super scary but it was... Amazingly well done. I found myself thoroughly transported to the setting, hahaha. I think I give it a 4.5/5.

      Frankly speaking, I'm just super happy that I never had any mandatory large and insane Christmas gatherings. Now, I definitely never will - if it goes too poorly, Krampus will show up, and I'll have to pay penance for every time I ate Santa's cookies. :(
    • ^ It was better than I thought as well :p

      ~~~

      I saw the new Tomb Raider at the cinema yesterday. I loved it^^
      It's a different Tomb Raider than the old games and movies of course, but that's not a bad thing. I like the old games and movies and really like the character. But I enjoyed myself a lot while watching this one as well.
    • Foo and I recently watched Annihilation.

      The visuals were great, I enjoyed it while it lasted. But afterward...

      Display Spoiler

      It was kind of like "wtf no one made any good scientific or even common sense decisions even though the team were supposedly scientists????? Scientists with military training???" So pissed at this! The group should have been regular folks with no specialized skills for the human decisions in this movie to make any freakin sense. What a disappointment considering how good Ex Machina was.


      "Oh hun, ... somewhere out there, there's a planet for you. It's not this one." -- Foo
      [signature by RealmWings]

      The post was edited 2 times, last by boxes ().

    • @boxes Yeah, Chel and and I have been debating watching Annihilation and the stuff that you put in the spoiler is basically what's giving us pause.

      Display Spoiler

      I've noticed that modern science fiction movies tend to disappoint me in the same way over and over - the characters are just phenomenally stupid. No one tends to notice it except for me and Chel, but it's jarring enough that we'll walk out on stuff that's too bad.

      Aliens Covenant, Life, and now Annihilation. Kinda all similarly sloppy with anything resembling smart scientific decision-making.

      So uh, if you know of any smartly written movies with good characters... Lemme know!
    • It's a problem that the characters in Annihilation don't make great decisions, but the movie is also *about* self-destructive and suicidal tendencies so I'm willing to give the individuals, discretely, a bit of a pass. It's not like the recent Alien movies (and personally I think Prometheus is way worse the Covenant :P) where the characters do the dumbest thing imaginable at every junction for no reason despite ostensibly being hand-picked professionals.

      It's a bigger problem for Annihilation that the society - the whole scientific apparatus - isn't being at all efficient and it's not really explained why. This is a... recurring gripe with me

      Display Spoiler


      (The quoted text is good ol Lucretia)


      It's sad because this is something that "dumb" movies often do right, if only through blind faith in the machine. Like (Michael Bay's) Armageddon is total bullshit, but each step NASA takes in that movie is justifiable and sane. In general, disaster movies do all right in the "scientists are level one intelligent" metric (and then fall down entirely in the "the universe doesn't actually work that way" metric). Some disaster books, which get to be hard science in a way that the movies don't, actually end up doing a pretty great job.

      But I think it comes back to what was being said in the Agency in Media thread a few months ago. Most genres aren't set up to allow characters who make the kinds of decisions we'd often like to see characters make :/
      ~~~
      Although postsocratics like St. Augustine and Judith Butler explored a diverse set of ethical and metaphysical ideas, their unifying feature as a movement was a principled refusal to speculate upon which of the four elements the world was made out of.
      ~~~


      boxes is the best human and I am going to get her a kitten or 2 kittens

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Foo ().

    • I saw Pacific Rim Uprising on Thursday. I was a big fan of the original, but this one disappointed me. It was a frustrating sequel because, on one hand, it deviated from the original so drastically at times to the point of infuriating. The lack of key characters from the original, and the horrible utilization of those who did return was a major bummer. But on the other hand, just when it appeared that it was going to follow a very different, fresh plot, it wimps out at the last second and becomes a retread of the first. It discarded parts of the original that should have returned, and reused parts that should have been left in the past.

      We need to find a way to clone Guillermo del Toro.

      ScarlyCrow wrote:

      ...

      I just watched Krampus. Ummm, I'm not sure what I expected but I definitely didn't expect an actually decent holiday horror movie. It wasn't super scary but it was... Amazingly well done. I found myself thoroughly transported to the setting, hahaha. I think I give it a 4.5/5.

      Frankly speaking, I'm just super happy that I never had any mandatory large and insane Christmas gatherings. Now, I definitely never will - if it goes too poorly, Krampus will show up, and I'll have to pay penance for every time I ate Santa's cookies. :(
      Krampus was an underrated, delightful surprise. It was far better than it had any right to be. I feel like that one really proved Michael Dougherty's talent as a writer/director.

      That's why I think Godzilla: King of the Monsters is in good hands with him at the helm. I think he'll get the most out of a Kaiju flick that many want to be more action-packed than 2014's Godzilla.


      boxes wrote:

      The visuals were great, I enjoyed it while it lasted. But afterward...

      Display Spoiler

      It was kind of like "wtf no one made any good scientific or even common sense decisions even though the team were supposedly scientists????? Scientists with military training???" So pissed at this! The group should have been regular folks with no specialized skills for the human decisions in this movie to make any freakin sense. What a disappointment considering how good Ex Machina was.

      Display Spoiler

      What kind of ill-advised decisions did they make? The only one I could really consider was when Anya tied everyone up, but I think it was entirely believable that she would snap after all that had happened up to that point, especially after discovering that Lena had been hiding her motivations for going with them.

      I attribute any less-than-rational decisions or overreactions on the cast's part to the Shimmer messing with their minds. It was established pretty early on that the extent of the Shimmer's influence was boundless, so I see no reason why it couldn't have distorted their rationale like it did any physical matter.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Mirren ().

    • *staggers into the topic*

      I... I'm still alive! I AM still ALIVE!

      @Chel and I just finished watching the movie 1408. We went into it expecting something that was reasonably well made, functional, and intellectual. Solid but non-inspirational horror. What we got was a murderous rampage that jumps the shark multiple times, throws more jump scares and emotional manipulation than a bad found footage horror.

      The emotional manipulation is tortuous. Heart pounding sadness. Wretched thrills. Sometimes just plain cheesy. However, one thing is true - it was very effective horror. I don't know if the weird soup of camp, seriousness, and visceral sadness will work for everyone, but I ended the movie in a cold sweat. Nicely done! I give it an 8/10 on my "will this movie cause a heart attack if you don't like like scary stuff". Strongly recommended!

      For reference, this was the first horror movie that we've watched that actually made Chel yelp - and it happened more than once! It's incredible. It isn't that she's not normally scared, its just that Chel normally internalizes her terror and it expresses itself later through jumpiness and repeated trips to the bathroom. Anyways!

      @Mirren

      Ahhh! Oh no! I'm so frustrated by everything about Pacific Rim Uprising. I'm frustrated that it was made so ridiculously different from the first movie. Frustrated that it ended up being just a copycat. Frustrated that it wasn't a Guillermo del Toro movie. Just plain frustrated. I had low expectations, and actually your review kinda confirms my worst fears.

      Mirren wrote:

      Krampus was an underrated, delightful surprise. It was far better than it had any right to be. I feel like that one really proved Michael Dougherty's talent as a writer/director.

      That's why I think Godzilla: King of the Monsters is in good hands with him at the helm. I think he'll get the most out of a Kaiju flick that many want to be more action-packed than 2014's Godzilla.
      ... Wait, hold on a second. I didn't realize that the same guy behind Krampus is also directing the next American Godzilla movie. Welp, at least I have some glorious kaiju news to look forward to, hahaha. For the record, I'm actually a big fan of Godzilla and other similar things. I've seen nearly all of the Godzilla movies, at least once. :3
    • ScarlyCrow wrote:

      ... Wait, hold on a second. I didn't realize that the same guy behind Krampus is also directing the next American Godzilla movie. Welp, at least I have some glorious kaiju news to look forward to, hahaha. For the record, I'm actually a big fan of Godzilla and other similar things. I've seen nearly all of the Godzilla movies, at least once. :3
      We just became best friends.

      I'm a Kaiju fanatic.
    • Mirren wrote:


      We just became best friends.
      I'm a Kaiju fanatic.
      Woah, really? XD

      I've never met anyone else that was into Kaiju to the same degree (or greater) than I am? XD

      What's your favorite movie? :o Mine is actually Shin Godzilla, which I kinda feel is one of the best kaiju movies that has been made so far, in that it showed the complicated human element in addition to showcasing the power of the monster.

      I had actually been hoping that Godzilla 2014 would become my new fave because (controversial opinion) I really liked Godzilla's design. However, I was really discouraged by how little Godzilla that we actually get to see in that movie, and I found the humans to be irritating and kinda just in the way. I wanted more monster battles. Oh well, at least we got Muto love as a new meme, hahaha. <3
    • Jumping in on the Kaiju love, my favorite movie for the genre is Godzilla: Tokyo S.O.S. Probably one of the cheesiest and absurd movies I've ever seen (and that's counting the other Kaiju movies I've watched), but that's why I love it.

      More OT, another genre I really like is martial arts films. I rewatched Enter the Dragon with a friend earlier today because we had been planning on it for a week, they've never seen it before. Still a great movie.
    • Jimin wrote:

      More OT, another genre I really like is martial arts films. I rewatched Enter the Dragon with a friend earlier today because we had been planning on it for a week, they've never seen it before. Still a great movie.

      I'm actually a low key fan of martial arts and samurai films. I think that my current favorite is Harakiri (1962) due to the combination of excellent acting, beautiful scenery, an amazing story, and strong cinematography.

      For martial arts, I really want to watch Ip Man - I keep meaning to get to it, but I've been on a horror movie binge lately that doesn't seem to end.
    • ScarlyCrow wrote:

      Jimin wrote:

      More OT, another genre I really like is martial arts films. I rewatched Enter the Dragon with a friend earlier today because we had been planning on it for a week, they've never seen it before. Still a great movie.
      I'm actually a low key fan of martial arts and samurai films. I think that my current favorite is Harakiri (1962) due to the combination of excellent acting, beautiful scenery, an amazing story, and strong cinematography.

      For martial arts, I really want to watch Ip Man - I keep meaning to get to it, but I've been on a horror movie binge lately that doesn't seem to end.
      The Ip Man movies are very good, so I recommend them for sure.

      In regards to samurai films specifically I think Akira Kurosawa makes some of the best (and anything else he does is pretty fantastic too), so I'd consider his films some of my favorites. Harakiri is also a very great film though! I agree with your thoughts about it.

      ((Side note: I'm getting very tempted to load up Godzilla vs. SpaceGodzilla now. I haven't seen that movie in a long while.))
    • @Mirren

      Display Spoiler

      I completely agree w/ you -- any decisions made after the team entered the shimmer were understandable considering the environment and/or could be explained as a combo of the group members' self-destructive behavior and shimmer effects. The bad decisions were made before the team entered.

      (I'm writing this super fast before work so don't mind any errors!)

      My criticism is that despite being scientists and being recruited by a military organization which apparently wanted to do science (investigate the phenomenon), very little was done to actually uh, conduct scientific experiments before throwing the team into the shimmer with pretty much no defense. I can accept that it was a voluntary suicide mission for most of the team, but Lena at the very least specifically said she wanted to make it out (and she fought for her life inside and did) so her lack of good scientific decision making and common sense -- which should have occurred in the form of questioning the specifics of their operation -- before entering doesn't make sense. The members of the organization itself also failed in this respect, I know these were not necessarily decisions made on-screen but I'm referring more to their effects on the team and storyline.

      Couple examples:
      At the time of the group's entry, the journey to and from the lighthouse was expected to take approx. a couple weeks on foot yet no one thought to take a car/tank/Jeep/whatever in? As the two running hypotheses for the previous crews' absences were that something was killing them or that they were killing each other, you'd think they'd bring a little more defense or at least something to shave some time off the trip. There were abandoned vehicles (not military) in the shimmer and there were probably roads going to the light house in the original map.

      Likewise no one thought to take a boat in? There was a clear line of sight between the edge of the shimmer and the shore by the light house, as we saw at the end of the movie. A motorized boat would have again shaved a bunch of time off the trip.

      Radiofrequency interference prevented the use of remote controlled sampling robots or drones, but no one thought to use wired communication for such things. Like dangle a camera or robot out of a helicopter - the copter staying out of the shimmer - or set up wired cameras just outside the shimmer early on and let the shimmer overtake them while they transmitted back to HQ via copper or fibre optic. Electronics that were self-contained did operate in the shimmer, like their video cameras, so they should have had way more info about what they were getting into (e.g. they would have seen the trees shaped like ppl, strange plants, colored mosses etc evolve, and maybe caught some of the animals on tape). Obviously this ruins the suspense and surprise but not doing something like this is inconsistent for a scientific investigation.



      Edit. Part II

      Display Spoiler

      Okay, so some things like taking motorized forms of transport in are more common sense things than strictly science things and I did say scientific decisions so here are a couple more things that irked me.

      Samples + DNA
      The team took some samples during their exploration. It was clear that samples were desired - they were sent in with sampling equipment like swabs, etc. But it didn't seem like them or any of the previous teams did preliminary work in terms of sampling. Crossing the border with a tether, grabbing samples, and coming right back out. Soil, air, water (from the ocean side) samples. Hazmat suits during this process (concern about pathogens for example) or sampling devices on poles, carts, etc. inserted through the barrier and brought out again by someone remaining on the outside. Spectroscopy* (portable devices). Bacterial culturing.

      Taking a look at water samples under a microscope could have shown them altered bacterial life forms. We saw that the team were affected immediately after entering, as they lost their memories, so it is not far-fetched to think that if something small like bacteria immediately inside the boundary were examined, they may already show DNA or physical changes.

      Related, after Kane returned, I would expect blood cultures, skin swabs, oral swabs, etc., to be taken and examined. It seems very unlikely that changes to form, behavior, or DNA for organisms like bacteria were not known about, and that information seems like something that should be passed on to a team of scientists and which would guide their methodology. The biologist (Lena) should have asked for this or similar before going in.

      ---

      After sending in a few teams and failing, ... the organization continued to send the same sorts of teams with similar provisions and equipment, expecting a new result. (We saw that previous teams had similar survival gear and equipment (grenades, video cameras, similar uniforms, were on foot, etc.) as the current team.) Remember, this thing was expanding for years and multiple teams were lost in that time.

      I would have expected the collective group of scientists to come up with different, more cautious, more rigorous methodology than their military counterparts before them (see above, for example).


      * Radio waves were "scrambled" in the shimmer, but visible light wasn't. The crew could see each other, see into the distance, etc. So somewhere between radio frequency and 700 nm there was a cutoff point where light was no longer scattered. No effort was made by those outside the shimmer (and the team had a physicist) to determine the cause of or more about the RFI/wireless comm issues before they entered. The issue was quickly resolved once they were in there. This could have been another device-on-a-stick stuck in there with the scientists safely on the outside.


      "Oh hun, ... somewhere out there, there's a planet for you. It's not this one." -- Foo
      [signature by RealmWings]

      The post was edited 2 times, last by boxes ().

    • ScarlyCrow wrote:

      Mirren wrote:

      We just became best friends.
      I'm a Kaiju fanatic.
      Woah, really? XD
      I've never met anyone else that was into Kaiju to the same degree (or greater) than I am? XD

      What's your favorite movie? :o Mine is actually Shin Godzilla, which I kinda feel is one of the best kaiju movies that has been made so far, in that it showed the complicated human element in addition to showcasing the power of the monster.

      I had actually been hoping that Godzilla 2014 would become my new fave because (controversial opinion) I really liked Godzilla's design. However, I was really discouraged by how little Godzilla that we actually get to see in that movie, and I found the humans to be irritating and kinda just in the way. I wanted more monster battles. Oh well, at least we got Muto love as a new meme, hahaha. <3
      Yeah I was something like 3 years old when my parents took me to Toys R Us one time, saw the VHS of Godzilla vs. King Kong (1962), and it was love at first sight. While other kids grew up watching/reading anything Star Wars, Superman, Batman, Spider-man etc. my thing was giant monsters. Goji was my superhero.

      As for my favorite movie, I have three different answers for that. And it's still brutally hard for me to narrow it down.

      Gojira (1954) for the impact and the [still to this day] unmatched poignancy.

      Godzilla vs. The Sea Monster for the campy, mindlessly fun side of Godzilla. That was one of my earliest watches, and when it comes to pure popcorn entertainment, that one brings such a dumb grin to my face every time.

      Godzilla 2014 for the sheer experience of it all. That was the first Godzilla movie I ever saw in a theater, and I was pretty much a 5 year old boy on Christmas morning seeing that thing. I recruited about 15 of my friends to join me because I was treating it like an event. The buildup to it, the great marketing, the hype around knowing that a big budget, blockbuster Godzilla was intriguing mainstream audiences was so exciting after growing up with the genre largely being perceived as cheesy B-grade entertainment for much of my life. I think the movie was awesome, too. Seeing how well they captured the scale of the Kaiju and the helplessness of humanity before them was awe-inspiring. That was the kind of cutting-edge, state of the art spectacle that the genre has long deserved.

      Shin Godzilla was also fantastic. Loaded with interesting themes and metaphors. I was lucky enough to catch that in theaters during its limited US release.


      boxes wrote:

      @Mirren

      Display Spoiler

      I completely agree w/ you -- any decisions made after the team entered the shimmer were understandable considering the environment and/or could be explained as a combo of the group members' self-destructive behavior and shimmer effects. The bad decisions were made before the team entered.

      (I'm writing this super fast before work so don't mind any errors!)

      My criticism is that despite being scientists and being recruited by a military organization which apparently wanted to do science (investigate the phenomenon), very little was done to actually uh, conduct scientific experiments before throwing the team into the shimmer with pretty much no defense. I can accept that it was a voluntary suicide mission for most of the team, but Lena at the very least specifically said she wanted to make it out (and she fought for her life inside and did) so her lack of good scientific decision making and common sense -- which should have occurred in the form of questioning the specifics of their operation -- before entering doesn't make sense. The members of the organization itself also failed in this respect, I know these were not necessarily decisions made on-screen but I'm referring more to their effects on the team and storyline.

      Couple examples:
      At the time of the group's entry, the journey to and from the lighthouse was expected to take approx. a couple weeks on foot yet no one thought to take a car/tank/Jeep/whatever in? As the two running hypotheses for the previous crews' absences were that something was killing them or that they were killing each other, you'd think they'd bring a little more defense or at least something to shave some time off the trip. There were abandoned vehicles (not military) in the shimmer and there were probably roads going to the light house in the original map.

      Likewise no one thought to take a boat in? There was a clear line of sight between the edge of the shimmer and the shore by the light house, as we saw at the end of the movie. A motorized boat would have again shaved a bunch of time off the trip.

      Radiofrequency interference prevented the use of remote controlled sampling robots or drones, but no one thought to use wired communication for such things. Like dangle a camera or robot out of a helicopter - the copter staying out of the shimmer - or set up wired cameras just outside the shimmer early on and let the shimmer overtake them while they transmitted back to HQ via copper or fibre optic. Electronics that were self-contained did operate in the shimmer, like their video cameras, so they should have had way more info about what they were getting into (e.g. they would have seen the trees shaped like ppl, strange plants, colored mosses etc evolve, and maybe caught some of the animals on tape). Obviously this ruins the suspense and surprise but not doing something like this is inconsistent for a scientific investigation.



      Edit. Part II

      Display Spoiler

      Okay, so some things like taking motorized forms of transport in are more common sense things than strictly science things and I did say scientific decisions so here are a couple more things that irked me.

      Samples + DNA
      The team took some samples during their exploration. It was clear that samples were desired - they were sent in with sampling equipment like swabs, etc. But it didn't seem like them or any of the previous teams did preliminary work in terms of sampling. Crossing the border with a tether, grabbing samples, and coming right back out. Soil, air, water (from the ocean side) samples. Hazmat suits during this process (concern about pathogens for example) or sampling devices on poles, carts, etc. inserted through the barrier and brought out again by someone remaining on the outside. Spectroscopy* (portable devices). Bacterial culturing.

      Taking a look at water samples under a microscope could have shown them altered bacterial life forms. We saw that the team were affected immediately after entering, as they lost their memories, so it is not far-fetched to think that if something small like bacteria immediately inside the boundary were examined, they may already show DNA or physical changes.

      Related, after Kane returned, I would expect blood cultures, skin swabs, oral swabs, etc., to be taken and examined. It seems very unlikely that changes to form, behavior, or DNA for organisms like bacteria were not known about, and that information seems like something that should be passed on to a team of scientists and which would guide their methodology. The biologist (Lena) should have asked for this or similar before going in.

      ---

      After sending in a few teams and failing, ... the organization continued to send the same sorts of teams with similar provisions and equipment, expecting a new result. (We saw that previous teams had similar survival gear and equipment (grenades, video cameras, similar uniforms, were on foot, etc.) as the current team.) Remember, this thing was expanding for years and multiple teams were lost in that time.

      I would have expected the collective group of scientists to come up with different, more cautious, more rigorous methodology than their military counterparts before them (see above, for example).


      * Radio waves were "scrambled" in the shimmer, but visible light wasn't. The crew could see each other, see into the distance, etc. So somewhere between radio frequency and 700 nm there was a cutoff point where light was no longer scattered. No effort was made by those outside the shimmer (and the team had a physicist) to determine the cause of or more about the RFI/wireless comm issues before they entered. The issue was quickly resolved once they were in there. This could have been another device-on-a-stick stuck in there with the scientists safely on the outside.

      Cripes @boxes if I wanted to read that much about Annihilation I'd read the damn book it was based on :lol:

      Display Spoiler

      As for taking motorized vehicles into the Shimmer, my first thought is that driving through the everglades probably would be unwieldy haha. They may very well have tried, though, but as they learned that drones and radios were useless in there, maybe they just assumed any kind of technology was at risk. They made numerous expeditions into the Shimmer beforehand, so there's no telling exactly what materials or apparatus the prior teams took with them.

      Perhaps they did try the "reach in with a big stick" test, and it just didn't procure much compelling data. Could have been that the outermost edges of the Shimmer didn't mutate as much of the matter within as it did further toward the core. I don't know. As I've mentioned elsewhere in analysis of the movie, it's purpose seems to be to baffle audiences just as much as it does the characters. There are only hypotheses looking within the Shimmer.

      I can see where you're coming from on some of your scrutiny, I just don't think they're big enough knocks against the integrity of the premise to be anything more than nitpicky.

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Mirren ().

    • @Mirren

      Display Spoiler

      If the group were soldiers under orders like previous teams or regular folks stuck in a bad luck situation I'd have no real issues here.

      I'm just giving a few examples as to things I thought scientists may try that, being consistent with the world's physics, should have given them info before going in.

      Bottom line is the movie was about a group of highly qualified scientists who did no science even though that's why they were there, supposedly.


      "Oh hun, ... somewhere out there, there's a planet for you. It's not this one." -- Foo
      [signature by RealmWings]
    • @Mirren @boxes

      After reading the back and forth here, I decided to watch Annihilation. And...

      Display Spoiler

      You're both right.

      A bit of context before I rant - I actually write science fiction (being unpublished doesn't diminish my hoard of carefully curated and researched world building). So, my own perspective is probably informed by this.

      The scientists in the movie were written like really inexperienced military personnel without scientific backgrounds. There was a severe lack of the sparks of intuition - the theories, the "getting lost" in discovery, the jargon.

      Honestly, I don't think that the movie was meant to be science fiction, even if that's how they pitched it. It really looks like science fantasy, which is a slightly different (sub??) genre as compared to science fiction. Science fantasy focuses on the fuzzy conception of tomorrow and all of the possibilities that it holds, without worrying about attaching things to any real universe. Science fiction, on the other hand, tends to be a bit more grounded.

      As science fiction, the movie failed -
      • No one thought about going *under* the shimmer?
      • There were no samples gathered at all, of anything.
      • No one thought that maybe, just maybe - the shimmer's changing of things had something to do with alien terraforming.
      • Despite their professions, no one was really using any of the knowledge from their field.
      • There was no review of past teams and their outcomes before the mission?
      A lot of this can be explained as compromises that were made due to time constraints, but I think that the writers could have at least thrown a few bones towards science if this was a science fiction story.

      As science fantasy though, I think that the movie triumphed quite solidly -
      • It made me question the concept of self, to wonder what could happen if something refracted the nature of humanity. Where does the human end and something new begins
      • With the quote from the movie that "things mutated more as they approached the center" - there was a building sense of tension because you knew that things were only going to get stranger
      • It did something different, in that it didn't automatically assume that what was unexplained and unknown was inherently bad - I appreciated that it wasn't the standard "we should be afraid of weird stuff" trope; instead, the strange was beautiful, enticing, magnificent
      I enjoyed the movie. I think I'd summarize it by saying that it was a dumb and terrible science fiction movie, but a beautiful and poignant work of science fantasy. I would talk about it more, but it's really getting late over here, and I'm sleepy af.

      Just one last thought...

      Display Spoiler

      We only have the sole survivor's word that she made it out and not the copy. How do we know that the copy wasn't the one that made it out?


      Umm, other than this, If anyone ever wants a movie that sort of deals intensely with this same setting, I'd recommend The Thing (1982).

      If you want to watch the literal exact same thing as this movie, then you can watch Stalker (1979).

      Enjoy! : )
    • Thank you @ScarlyCrow lol that was very eloquently put.

      Display Spoiler

      My mind won't shut up about this movie and I keep thinking of more and more experiments I would have done hahahaha.

      Like mice. No one put a mouse in there. "oh look the cage is busted and the mouse is gone, guess something in there is carnivorous!"

      LOL gdi

      ---

      I agree with the notion of this being good science fantasy, and as a thriller it definitely had me curious, scared, tense, etc. As I said I really enjoyed this movie during, when I suspended disbelief and just enjoyed the ride. It's only after, being able to think about it for days, that I get more disappointed in what the movie could have been for me, personally (a scientist), if they'd thought about what it means to have scientists as protagonists (or if they'd written other professions in instead). I'm taking the entire premise of the expedition less and less seriously the more I think about it.

      ScarlyCrow wrote:

      Despite their professions, no one was really using any of the knowledge from their field.
      I think this pretty much hits the nail on the head, and puts the nail in the coffin, for me. Even Tony Stark does some engineering!


      Ex Machina had me spooked for days afterward, in a good way. I was looking for that sort of experience again, and I think this definitely had the potential to do so. I think my personal expectation and anticipation hurt me with this one, unfortunately.


      "Oh hun, ... somewhere out there, there's a planet for you. It's not this one." -- Foo
      [signature by RealmWings]

      The post was edited 3 times, last by boxes ().