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    The War Room III: From British Invasion to British Implosion
    • Are you suggesting that we get rid of the private attorney system?

      While that would be a massive step toward insuring equality in the court system and might be a discussion worth having, but I'm not sure I support it. Your right to your own defence is second only to your right to property pretty much.

      The Public Defender system is already under funded when compared to the District Attorney and so I don't feel like that people, who should be considered innocent until proven guilty, should be made to depend on a defence that isn't as well funded as the prosecution.
    • HeroOfTime5 wrote:

      Such bullshit.

      He was appointed by Reggan. This is why I think the judicial branch is inherently flawed. It’s not a democracy when a lifetime appointment from 30 years ago can affect things in the future.

      This is why McConnell packs the courts. The courts will protect the corrupt GOP from their crimes and abusive actions.
      Non-appointed judges are also a problem. They then are either elected, which has a whole host of problems, or can be turfed by the current administration whenever they want which means they're no longer independant.

      urnotlikeme wrote:

      Oddly enough, between civil and criminal cases, there are a LOT of loopholes, civil lawsuits are much more straightforward and have way less loopholes than criminal prosecutions (a lawyer friend told me, so take with a grain of salt). But the inherent flaw goes beyond a GOP judge and extends to the very concept that hiring a really expensive lawyer reduces your prison time, essentially paying money for time of your life, and a judicial industry that loves eating every dollar in spite of the law.
      What's the alternative you'd suggest?

      May those who accept their fate be granted happiness;

      Those who defy it, glory!
    • John wrote:

      What's the alternative you'd suggest?
      I unfortunately have none. This type of system is so ingrained in our heads and society that... I literally can't think of any other way. I don't believe in an equitably funded law industry, and yet the more I learn about the judicial system, the more I see the flaws. Another possible solution is indeed, increasing funding for public defense, but then we have to rely on big law firms for civil defense. One possible fix is to better educate the people on the state attorneys. Remember that many judges and state prosecutors are voted in, but most people buy in to the "I keep criminals off the street" sentiment without understanding rules that HELLA favor prosecutors and favor destroying poor families.

      I will say though, don't you find it kind of ironic that the US government expects you to know the law but doesn't require public schools to teach law?

      The post was edited 1 time, last by urnotlikeme ().

    • Calls for military intervention are reaching a pitch I have not seen within the Venezuelan community before.

      On Thursday afternoon until Sunday morning, Venezuela had no power.

      Take a second to consider how absolutely terrifying it would be for you, to have no electricity, which also means no gas, no water, no methods of communication, no street lights - and for that to stretch on and on, as your food begins to rot, you can't flush your toilets, can't use the lifts to get down your 18 story building.

      If this happened in Australia, in any city, hell if it happened in a rural town, the military would spring into action.

      A state of emergency would be called, troops would bring water, food, build shelter, begin to count and take registrations of people. Prioritise the hospitals, register new borns, take extra measures for those with disabilities or chronic disorders.

      What did the Maduro regime do?

      Absolutely nothing.

      Literally nothing.

      Oh, well I suppose they did go to state media, to the radios to begin to blame the USA, and Juan Guaido for an apparent 'cyber-attack' on the electrical system.

      Bullshit. Absolute crap. Venezuela has been suffering black outs for DECADES. I remember back in 2001, being in Venezuela, and the power routinely cutting out for hours at a time in Caracas. This isn't a new phenomenon, in rural Venezuela this happens weekly, if not daily. The only thing new this time is that it was so long, and so wide, this time affecting major metropolitan centres.

      You know what's happened? The autocratic regime has no care for how these systems are managed and slowly but surely has been destroying with its incompetency every. single. thing. in. the. country. Anyone who stood up to the Chavista unionists would be threatened or harassed or in some cases kidnapped until they left their post, in which time those gangsters would merely fill those jobs with their own people, people without the skills, education, or training necessary to run the systems they were put in front of. Why else do you think none of Venezuela's oil refineries work anymore? You'll hear white socialists jump for joy at this 'they're giving the jobs to the working class, kicking out the spoilt middle classed petty bourgeois,' BUT HOW do they do that job without a god, damn, degree?! Without any training? I am all for empowering the middle class, but expropriating industry and jobs and merely giving them to a working-class person *does not work*. And you're a god damn ideological fool if you think it does.

      48% of workers from the electrical industry have left the country according to Alí Briceño, the executive secretary of the a Federación de Trabajadores de la Industria Eléctrica de Venezuela. From 50 thousand, 24 thousand left. 14.7 thousand electrical engineers, specialists and technicians all left, and the country has not been able to reabsorb the necessary amount of skilled and trained individuals to run Venezuela anymore.

      There is not only a tremendous brain drain in the country, there is a regime that does not have the capacity to retrain new specialists. And what we are seeing is that the problems that began in rural Venezuela are now becoming nationwide. This is not new, this is not the fault of the USA or Guaido, this is a crisis 20 years in the making and it began when we elected Hugo Rafael Chavez Frias.


      You will read from a lot of Venezuelans, who normally are perhaps the most sceptical people of the USA on the planet, calling for military intervention now. They want Responsibility to Protect to be enacted and for this to just be over. And can you blame them? Can you blame them after the trauma they've just experienced, that we've all just experienced? Me personally, I don't know anymore. I think rationally I want Trump to step back and let Guaido lead with Brazilian and Colombian faces behind him, but emotionally? I'd rather try to calm down first.

      I am certain without a doubt, you will see posters around Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra from the Socialist Alliance with "HANDS OFF VENEZUELA" and see white 'thought leaders' like Sam King, or worse, people who should be our allies like Boots Riley scoff at us for our naivete, for wanting a military intervention led by the USA or a coalition of Latin American states, and you know what, let them. Because while they get to keep their hands clean, opining from the USA, Australia, or Canada, we're the ones here unable to speak to our own families. Most of them didn't know a thing about Venezuela before January 23rd, and it shows, this is nothing more than a moment for them to wave their socialist credentials, at the expense of my family's wellbeing -and there is nothing more supremacist than that.

      At the end of the day, when this leaves the international news headlines, and they've moved on to defend some other authoritarian regime like Kim Jong-Un or whoever, we'll still be here, picking up the pieces while they argue amongst themselves over how much more they know about the horrors they chose to ignore.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Lucretia ().

    • We can actually disagree whether or not the Confederate statues are racist. There's a lot more that the Confederacy represented than just slavery, and this statue actually predated the 1960s Civil Rights Movement that most of these statues came from being a reaction to (which ofcourse was a racist move) but ultimately these statues are un-American.

      The Confederacy spent it's entire existence at war with the USA. If you can trace your roots back to America during this time then you probably are related to someone who died during the American Civil War. A lot of people died and the ultimate result of the war was that the things represented by the Confederacy and why it separated from the US were things that were wrong.

      Someone in that article called it a travesty that the statue was taken down and I am more sympathetic to this statue of an "unnamed Confederate soldier" than I am to ones of Confederate generals since at least you can argue that the statue was more of a memorial to those that died than a rally cry of "The South will rise again" but the money that it costs to take these things down is minuscule to the cost of the social costs that these statues often create.



      linkthezora wrote:

      cbsnews.com/news/president-tru…ht-saving-time-permanent/
      I...I can't even be mad at you about this...

      Trump, you son of a bitch...

      I'll take it with a grain of salt, of course.
      Trump does stuff that's right all the time:

      a)Fake News really truly is the enemy of the people.

      b)There really is a deep-state of operations that keep corrupt politicians in office

      c)The common people need to be afraid of the elites


      A)What he calls "fake news" are only the legitimate sources of journalism that democracy requires to live but mis/disinformation is the most dangerous thing out there.

      B)The deep-state, as I see it, is mainly corporate money that decides who can get elected and thus what those elected say.

      C) Look at elites like Trump and the Bush's, they're willing to lie and lie.

      He puts sauces of true flavor on top of an imaginary meal, he'll shoot from the hip and it lands somewhere new everytime.
    • The college admissions scandal is interesting because the main reason people are so appalled by the scandal is that it violates the ideal some people have of the meritocracy. Those who were deserving of a space in a university based on their grades or athletic performance were passed over because rich families bribed their child's way into the school. Its the same reason some people give for hating affirmative action (and though a lot of it is racism I'm sure a lot of people also genuinely believe that affirmative action is wrong for that reason.)

      But the biggest violation of the meritocracy (that is the biggest policy that allows those with lower academic performance to jump ahead of students who are on paper more deserving based solely on grades) is the one that is most ignored, legacy students. Why is someone whose mother went to Harvard more deserving of spot in the school than someone whose family is poor and never had that opportunity regardless of race. These schools have affirmative action for racial minorities, but they also have affirmative action for white relatively wealthy families (who are those more likely to be able to take advantage of legacy admissions.)

      Not to mention all the wealthy families who get their kid into a university by giving a huge donation. Why are people offended by this scandal, but not these other violations of the meritocracy that the rich take advantage of? Is the issue really that the rich person is bribing the wrong person?
    • Pietro wrote:

      The college admissions scandal is interesting because the main reason people are so appalled by the scandal is that it violates the ideal some people have of the meritocracy. Those who were deserving of a space in a university based on their grades or athletic performance were passed over because rich families bribed their child's way into the school. Its the same reason some people give for hating affirmative action (and though a lot of it is racism I'm sure a lot of people also genuinely believe that affirmative action is wrong for that reason.)

      But the biggest violation of the meritocracy (that is the biggest policy that allows those with lower academic performance to jump ahead of students who are on paper more deserving based solely on grades) is the one that is most ignored, legacy students. Why is someone whose mother went to Harvard more deserving of spot in the school than someone whose family is poor and never had that opportunity regardless of race. These schools have affirmative action for racial minorities, but they also have affirmative action for white relatively wealthy families (who are those more likely to be able to take advantage of legacy admissions.)

      Not to mention all the wealthy families who get their kid into a university by giving a huge donation. Why are people offended by this scandal, but not these other violations of the meritocracy that the rich take advantage of? Is the issue really that the rich person is bribing the wrong person?
      When I first heard of it, the thing that appalled me was the treatment of their children. I told my mother that if she did something like this to me, we wouldn't be in talking terms anymore. Imagine if this was discovered say 20 to 30 years in the future. And one of these students went on to start a successful political career. Imagine what would happen if this came to light.

      I don't think this was to help the children of these rich parents. The only thing they cared about was their pride.
    • In other news, here’s a recording of British Army comms during Bloody Sunday:



      Bearing in mind that the current Secretary for Northern Ireland, Karen Bradley, has said that British soldiers should not be prosecuted because these killings were “not crimes” and “They were people acting under orders and under instruction and fulfilling their duty in a dignified and appropriate way”.

      I really do hope Northern Ireland votes for reunification sooner rather than later.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by ibLeo ().

    • I posted about this after the 2016 election but the National Vote Interstate Compact continues to gain steam. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National…r_Vote_Interstate_Compact

      Colorado just passed it, New Mexico and Delaware just require the governors to sign it. I can see within a few years them being able to get a majority of the electoral college votes agreeing to this and making the system irrelevant.
    • There are alot of discussion threads around this forum that are touching on deradicalizing people, but no thread specifically devoted to the topic, so I will just post this here. It is a real world example of respectful discussion working to de radicalize clan members. I find it interesting because it runs so contrary to our nature to have respectful discussions with someone who is so radically hateful, yet it seems it can work if you have the courage, sincerity, and patience.

      Why I, as a black man, attend KKK rallies. | Daryl Davis | TEDxNaperville
    • reuters.com/article/us-kazakhs…yev-resigns-idUSKCN1R01N1

      I'm no expert of anything but this is interesting, I really want to see how Russia reacts, or more specifically Putin reacts. The article went on to call Putin and Nazarbayev allies. Which is laughable. If they ever were allies they weren't after this:

      rferl.org/a/kazakhstan-putin-h…tion-nation/26565141.html

      And so soon after Crimea, eh?

      Oh also it isn't Astana anymore it's Nursultan. Let's see how the Far Right Russians see this.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Mozly Alice ().