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Breath of the Wild's story moral and deeper meaning (spoilers)
  • BMAtreyu wrote:

    I agree that by the time [ALttP] was released many of those questions were not answered and remained like that until nowadays.

    ...

    Again, the main problem of [BotW] is giving us new concepts that were not explained...
    Give it the same 26 years we gave ALttP.

    This type of storytelling is what Zelda does, and BotW isn't some strange new flawed approach.

    The post was edited 2 times, last by Octorocker ().

  • Octorocker wrote:

    BMAtreyu wrote:

    I agree that by the time [ALttP] was released many of those questions were not answered and remained like that until nowadays.

    ...

    Again, the main problem of [BotW] is giving us new concepts that were not explained...
    Give it the same 26 years we gave ALttP.
    And do you feel that's a good thing?
    The game is amazing, but I feel bad that we need to wait so long for some questions that are related directly to this game, and could be answered easly on this game.

    The post was edited 2 times, last by BMAtreyu ().

  • BMAtreyu wrote:


    And do you feel that's a good thing?The game is amazing, but I feel bad that we need to wait so long for some questions that are related directly to this game, and could be answered easly on this game.

    I do feel that's a good thing.

    As I said earlier in this thread, there are enough games that fill the niche of spoonfeeding players story.

    From the series' beginning, the point was to intentionally hide things to force players to come together and communicate about the game.

    The point of not giving us answers is for us to find our own.
  • Violetlight wrote:

    A lot has been said in this thread about Zelda's emotional journey, her relationship with her father, etc. However, a very crucial detail is lacking if you're making this a discussion about morals:

    Hyrule was destroyed. Most of the Hylians were wiped out. Killed. The Hylian species as a whole is regulated to two small villages and a scattering of stables, where once there was a prosperous kingdom.

    Regardless of Zelda's character arc, the fact that so many people had to die for her to achieve her "freedom" from Princess responsibilities is horrible. Were all those people's lives worth it? Really? I doubt they'd say so.
    That's a very fair point. Sorry for the late reply. I don't know why this broken site doesn't notify me when I get new replies on my thread, it's really annoying.

    I suppose it is rather dark with the implication that in order for Zelda to be free, the Kingdom needed to fall. The fact remains that the analogy of the flower was that it needed to be free in the wild to bloom. Zelda needed to be free of expectations in order to go her own path. A more peaceful option would be for her to leave her kingdom and live in the wild peacefully, but Ganon had other plans. The destruction of Hyrule was Ganon's fault, not Zelda's.

    At the same time, it took the death of her loved ones, and the near death of Link, for her to be able to unlock the sealing power. Perhaps it required emotion to that extreme in order for it to appear.

    I do think that Zelda is happy to be free from such expectations at the end of the story. But that doesn't mean she's happy that the kingdom was destroyed. Of course she's sad that her father, friends, and people were killed. Ganon was responsible for that, and in a twisted way it worked out in her favor and freed her. Were it up to her, she could possibly have achieved her freedom in a peaceful way. Any immorality lays with Ganon's actions alone.
    "But courage need not be remembered... For it is never forgotten." ~Princess Zelda Hyrule XXXVIII

    The post was edited 1 time, last by HylianKnight ().

  • HylianKnight wrote:

    Violetlight wrote:

    A lot has been said in this thread about Zelda's emotional journey, her relationship with her father, etc. However, a very crucial detail is lacking if you're making this a discussion about morals:

    Hyrule was destroyed. Most of the Hylians were wiped out. Killed. The Hylian species as a whole is regulated to two small villages and a scattering of stables, where once there was a prosperous kingdom.

    Regardless of Zelda's character arc, the fact that so many people had to die for her to achieve her "freedom" from Princess responsibilities is horrible. Were all those people's lives worth it? Really? I doubt they'd say so.
    ...
    I do think that Zelda is happy to be free from such expectations at the end of the story. But that doesn't mean she's happy that the kingdom was destroyed. Of course she's sad that her father, friends, and people were killed. Ganon was responsible for that, and in a twisted way it worked out in her favor and freed her. Were it up to her, she could possibly have achieved her freedom in a peaceful way. Any immorality lays with Ganon's actions alone.
    I Agree, even not liking her duties Zelda did all she could have done to unlock her powers.
    But she had no guides, neither from her mother/grandmother, neither from the Gods*.
    *and WTF the statues started talking to Link so easly after his return.

    It's not fair to put those deaths on hers account.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by BMAtreyu ().

  • Octorocker wrote:

    Never minding that most of what you described is lore, let's do this. This is all from memory, so parts may be off, but you'll get the gist.

    In ALttP, Agahnim is kidnapping maidens, who are the descendants of Sages (that we learn nearly nothing about). You're telepathically (what) awoken by Zelda. (who we don't really learn anything about). Your Knight Uncle (who you never learn more about) dies and gives you a sword. You save Zelda.

    Sanctuary man sends you to Sahasrahla (who we learn nothing about). Sahasrahla says you need three pendants to get the MS (we never find out a good reason why the pendants exist) to break Agahnim's seal on the castle.

    You get the pendants and draw the sword (never learning the backstory of the sword) and evidently you're keeping the knights' line true (we never learn the significance of the knights).

    Zelda is taken back to Hyrule Castle. Link fights Agahnim. Link is taken to a Sacred Realm corrupted by Ganon's wish (see the manual for more information).

    Link must save the maidens (who are personality-less shells). The maidens use their power to give Link access to Ganon's Tower (which we learn nothing about). Link beats Agahnim again, who is Ganon's alter-ego (we never learn how Ganon got that part of himself to the Light World).

    Link fights Ganon in the Pyramid of Power (we don't learn anything about it) with the Silver Arrows (we don't learn anything about them). Ganon wants to take over the world (we learn almost nothing else about him, and what we do is from the manual). We're told Ganon was sealed in an Imprisoning War (but we don't really know anything about it).

    Link beats Ganon. Link recovers the Triforce (we learn almost nothing about it, and what we do is from the manual) and saves the world. End.

    This isn't counting all the locations (Lost Woods, Desert of Mystery, Death Mountain, Eastern Palace) that we learn nothing about. Nor is it counting the important items (Medallions, Pegasus Boots, Moon Pearl, Magic Mirror) we learn nothing about.

    Anybody else see the BotW parallels? I can do the exact same thing for OoT, WW, TP, and SS as well.
    Now you're over-analyzing in comparisons. BOTW didn't have much of a story to analyze. Every character or item within the story doesn't need a full or extended description attached to them. And if it doesn't have any or very little, it at least needs to give you an impression of why its there. AL ttP did that with everything. BOTW did not. ALttP presented its story very well. BOTW's did not. BOTW is so far off from being a Zelda story that you could literally just call the game BOTW and it could serve as its own game and story. The 10,000 year time gap was deliberate in my opinion. It allowed distance from the other games but did they not think this would bother the fans? Its like they read what we have to say about the series and they don't. ALttP came out 26 years ago before the Zelda story had grown into what it is today. BOTW comes out in 2017 where Nintendo has had 31 years of experience with the series to put towards new Zelda games and its as if so much of that experience is not considered in the process. If they were to remake ALttP in the same art style as BOTW I'm telling you it would outsell BOTW and every Zelda game by far in no time.
    My childhood can be explained in just four words: The Legend of Zelda
  • HylianKnight wrote:

    Violetlight wrote:

    A lot has been said in this thread about Zelda's emotional journey, her relationship with her father, etc. However, a very crucial detail is lacking if you're making this a discussion about morals:

    Hyrule was destroyed. Most of the Hylians were wiped out. Killed. The Hylian species as a whole is regulated to two small villages and a scattering of stables, where once there was a prosperous kingdom.

    Regardless of Zelda's character arc, the fact that so many people had to die for her to achieve her "freedom" from Princess responsibilities is horrible. Were all those people's lives worth it? Really? I doubt they'd say so.
    That's a very fair point. Sorry for the late reply. I don't know why this broken site doesn't notify me when I get new replies on my thread, it's really annoying.
    I suppose it is rather dark with the implication that in order for Zelda to be free, the Kingdom needed to fall. The fact remains that the analogy of the flower was that it needed to be free in the wild to bloom. Zelda needed to be free of expectations in order to go her own path. A more peaceful option would be for her to leave her kingdom and live in the wild peacefully, but Ganon had other plans. The destruction of Hyrule was Ganon's fault, not Zelda's.

    At the same time, it took the death of her loved ones, and the near death of Link, for her to be able to unlock the sealing power. Perhaps it required emotion to that extreme in order for it to appear.

    I do think that Zelda is happy to be free from such expectations at the end of the story. But that doesn't mean she's happy that the kingdom was destroyed. Of course she's sad that her father, friends, and people were killed. Ganon was responsible for that, and in a twisted way it worked out in her favor and freed her. Were it up to her, she could possibly have achieved her freedom in a peaceful way. Any immorality lays with Ganon's actions alone.
    This is something else I take issue too also. Zelda did not want to abandon her kingdom or being the princess. She simply wanted to do what everyone was expecting her to do, but she couldn't. This produced symptoms of stress which caused her to express a host of emotions. This is also why the whole flower symbolism doesn't make sense. Its a cliche and doesn't reflect her true character. The assumed symbolism is that Zelda can't be free to be herself so long as her life revolves around awakening the sealing power. Well, she sort of has to or everyone dies. And they did die. An entire kingdom fell, thousands of people died brutal, horrible deaths, her family died and Link went through hell and then "died" all so Zelda could reach the revelation that love for someone you care about awakened the power. She knew the consequences of not awakening her power which again also contributed to her ongoing pursuit of doing it and the stress that came from continually failing to do so. This wasn't about Zelda trying to escape what she was born into so she could be free to live her own life. Everyone dies if she does that too so that was not that could not be the implied symbolism of the flower. All in all, BOTW was just a poor story that was presented poorly. It had drama and emotion, but it lacked substance everywhere.
    My childhood can be explained in just four words: The Legend of Zelda
  • Octorocker wrote:

    Sorry, not interested in disputing this further.

    The point has repeatedly been proven in an obvious and incontrovertible manner.

    BotW's story is cut from the exact same cloth as prior Zelda games. It gave the exact same screen time to the exact same things that past Zelda games did.
    Well lets see. At the end of ALttP I wasn't left scratching my head with many questions I felt the game should have answered. In fact I loved it so much I invested more money into it by buying the graphic novel, player's guides and any magazine I saw in stores that had ALttP mentioned in it. BOTW gave me initial shock and satisfaction but once I went over the content a few more times I began to realize it lacked everything that made me react the way I did to ALttP. The only thing you have proven is that you have an opinion and you're standing by it.
    My childhood can be explained in just four words: The Legend of Zelda
  • Octorocker wrote:

    Alright, let's do this then.

    Pick a single, concrete example of a story aspect in BotW that you're dissatisfied with and I will show you how the revered ALttP did the exact same thing.
    I feel the same way as you when people say "TP had a bad story". I'm just like "...And how was OoT any better?..."
    "But courage need not be remembered... For it is never forgotten." ~Princess Zelda Hyrule XXXVIII

  • Octorocker wrote:

    Alright, let's do this then.

    Pick a single, concrete example of a story aspect in BotW that you're dissatisfied with and I will show you how the revered ALttP did the exact same thing.
    You already did this in a previous post by naming characters in ALttP and saying repeatedly they were not explained. The way the game presented them explained them enough to solidify the story. BOTW presented characters, but no substance to the characters. Not even in presentation. The only 2 characters in BOTW that were given some substance in character and presentation were Zelda and King Rhoam. The diaries did it for them. You also should consider that a Zelda game's story from 26 years ago is a lot easier to forgive in any aspect of lacking substance than a Zelda story presented now where they have had nearly 3 decades to build upon the experience that came with continuing the series. So even when it comes to comparing the 2 games, BOTW should have been dramatically better in story in all aspects that ALttP was.
    My childhood can be explained in just four words: The Legend of Zelda
  • HylianRoyal wrote:

    The way the game presented them explained them enough to solidify the story. BOTW presented characters, but no substance to the characters. Not even in presentation.
    Wrong.

    For instance, the Champions as compared to the Maidens, as they occupy the same story role.

    All we learned about the individual maidens was that they were descendants of the IW Sages, with no explanation of their powers.

    Likewise, all we learn about the Champions is that they were chosen for unexplained reasons, with no explanation of their powers.

    However, we learn considerably more about the Champions as individuals. So much more that you could split the information for each Champion in half (so you have eight Champions) and we still know more about each of the eight champions than we do the maidens.

    Point BotW.

    The only 2 characters in BOTW that were given some substance in character and presentation were Zelda and King Rhoam. The diaries did it for them.
    That's two more characters than ALttP. Or do you want to point out an ALttP character with comparable substance and development?

    You also should consider that a Zelda game's story from 26 years ago is a lot easier to forgive in any aspect of lacking substance than a Zelda story presented now where they have had nearly 3 decades to build upon the experience that came with continuing the series. So even when it comes to comparing the 2 games, BOTW should have been dramatically better in story in all aspects that ALttP was.
    This has no play here. Right now we're talking about whether the approach to storytelling is similar to the esteemed ALttP, not whether BotW can be something more.

    We can have that discussion if you want to.

    Octorocker wrote:

    Pick a single, concrete example of a story aspect in BotW that you're dissatisfied with and I will show you how the revered ALttP did the exact same thing.
    Now then, you told me that my earlier post was over-generalized, and in this post I gave you a specific example of how BotW's story is > than ALttP.

    Give me another specific example to debunk. I'm waiting.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Octorocker ().

  • Hylian Knight wrote:

    I suppose it is rather dark with the implication that in order for Zelda to be free, the Kingdom needed to fall. The fact remains that the analogy of the flower was that it needed to be free in the wild to bloom. Zelda needed to be free of expectations in order to go her own path. A more peaceful option would be for her to leave her kingdom and live in the wild peacefully, but Ganon had other plans. The destruction of Hyrule was Ganon's fault, not Zelda's.

    At the same time, it took the death of her loved ones, and the near death of Link, for her to be able to unlock the sealing power. Perhaps it required emotion to that extreme in order for it to appear.

    I do think that Zelda is happy to be free from such expectations at the end of the story. But that doesn't mean she's happy that the kingdom was destroyed. Of course she's sad that her father, friends, and people were killed. Ganon was responsible for that, and in a twisted way it worked out in her favor and freed her. Were it up to her, she could possibly have achieved her freedom in a peaceful way. Any immorality lays with Ganon's actions alone.
    I did not mean to imply that Zelda was maliciously responsible for her people's deaths. However, HylianRoyal brings up several good points about the story. The story itself seems to imply that the only way for Zelda to be free was for the Kingdom of Hyrule to be destroyed. Even without the prophesy (a rather cliched plot device in itself) she had no siblings that we know of, nobody else she could pawn her royal responsibilities off onto. The King was not a young man, even by Hylian standards. She'd be expected to be Queen at a moments' notice. Put the fact that she's the only one with this sealing power, the only one that could lock Ganon away for however long it takes for him to escape yet again ...

    It's ridiculous, and I think Zelda recognized the ridiculousness of her situation. Even if she did seal Ganon, so what? It's just passing the buck to a future generation.

    I think what she really wanted to do was not seal Ganon yet again, but to kill him. Dead. Find a way to permanently end the cycle of reincarnation. Hence her fascination with the ancient Sheikah tech -- the only viable alternative to relying on the arbitrarily given powers of uncaring and aloof gods. Maybe Zelda would have preferred a "Hylia helps those who help themselves" approach, and the insistence on relying upon the same methods used in the past, methods that do not work just added to her frustrations. She didn't unlock her sealing powers earlier because she simply didn't want to (unconsciously, but still). She wanted to find another way, a way that would work.

    The story in BotW is rather amazing when you read between the lines. There are problems, yes, there are cliches. My moral problem with it is with the implication that the journey of self-discovery of one teenage girl was reliant upon the deaths of so many. That's not Zelda's fault, it's the writers. Pick a genre, Literary Fiction or High Fantasy. Trying to do both in a limited medium like an open-world game, as opposed to a novel, is just asking for the trouble that we have been discussing.
    "Breath of the Wild: "Zelda's Redemption"


    After Calamity Ganon's defeat, a devastated Zelda must come to terms with her ruined kingdom, dead friends, and the resentment of the Hero who had saved her, but lost his fiancee. When all hope for a better future seems lost, she comes across a legend of a holy relic that can set things right, if she can find the ancient keys to access it. With the help of new friends, and without Link, can Zelda finally become a legend, on her own terms?


    Chapter 2: Crescendo of Regret -- A night at Dueling Peaks Stable helps Zelda to see just how much the world has changed in 100 years. The more she thinks about her role in the Calamity's defeat, the more guilt she feels.
  • Actually I feel much more satisfied about BoTW history after knowing where it might fit on Zelda Timeline..

    blackswede wrote:

    3. Breath of the Wild isn't as far into the future as we might think.
    Display Spoiler
    The legend about the guardians/divine beasts battling Ganon 10,000 years ago has been altered over the ages, and in truth the battle in question was the original battle between Hylia and Demise long before Skyward Sword. The guardians and divine beasts are creations of the same ancient civilization (the Shiekah) behind the timeshift stones, from the same era. The technology was lost because that civilization was destroyed in the battle and Skyloft was created. The seal from which Calamity Ganon escapes in BotW is unrelated, and was created by a Link/Zelda duo somewhere between TP and BotW, with no involvement of the guardians or divine beasts.


    Not official, but makes a lot of sence :)

    *And that's the missing point, if we talk about ALTTP and how it took years before many questions were answered, Nintendo did not have that backstory to rely on at that time.

    If there are such strong concepts in Zelda Timeline, and they ignore these when creating a new one, the current history will seem much weaker than other games that have these connections.




    Violetlight wrote:


    ...
    It's ridiculous, and I think Zelda recognized the ridiculousness of her situation. Even if she did seal Ganon, so what? It's just passing the buck to a future generation.

    I think what she really wanted to do was not seal Ganon yet again, but to kill him. Dead. Find a way to permanently end the cycle of reincarnation. Hence her fascination with the ancient Sheikah tech -- the only viable alternative to relying on the arbitrarily given powers of uncaring and aloof gods. Maybe Zelda would have preferred a "Hylia helps those who help themselves" approach, and the insistence on relying upon the same methods used in the past, methods that do not work just added to her frustrations. She didn't unlock her sealing powers earlier because she simply didn't want to (unconsciously, but still). She wanted to find another way, a way that would work.

    Perfect, I wish there were more "lines" on Zelda's speeches on this way of thinking, she would look much stronger and less annoying for not being able to reach her powers.

    The post was edited 3 times, last by BMAtreyu ().

  • Octorocker wrote:

    HylianRoyal wrote:

    The way the game presented them explained them enough to solidify the story. BOTW presented characters, but no substance to the characters. Not even in presentation.
    Wrong.
    For instance, the Champions as compared to the Maidens, as they occupy the same story role.

    All we learned about the individual maidens was that they were descendants of the IW Sages, with no explanation of their powers.

    Likewise, all we learn about the Champions is that they were chosen for unexplained reasons, with no explanation of their powers.

    However, we learn considerably more about the Champions as individuals. So much more that you could split the information for each Champion in half (so you have eight Champions) and we still know more about each of the eight champions than we do the maidens.

    Point BotW.

    The only 2 characters in BOTW that were given some substance in character and presentation were Zelda and King Rhoam. The diaries did it for them.
    That's two more characters than ALttP. Or do you want to point out an ALttP character with comparable substance and development?
    You also should consider that a Zelda game's story from 26 years ago is a lot easier to forgive in any aspect of lacking substance than a Zelda story presented now where they have had nearly 3 decades to build upon the experience that came with continuing the series. So even when it comes to comparing the 2 games, BOTW should have been dramatically better in story in all aspects that ALttP was.
    This has no play here. Right now we're talking about whether the approach to storytelling is similar to the esteemed ALttP, not whether BotW can be something more.
    We can have that discussion if you want to.

    Octorocker wrote:

    Pick a single, concrete example of a story aspect in BotW that you're dissatisfied with and I will show you how the revered ALttP did the exact same thing.
    Now then, you told me that my earlier post was over-generalized, and in this post I gave you a specific example of how BotW's story is > than ALttP.
    Give me another specific example to debunk. I'm waiting.
    There is no comparison to the champions in BOTW to the maidens in ALttP. The champions in BOTW were nothing more than collateral damage to Ganon's chaos. He didn't need them for anything. The maidens in ALttP however played a very important role and Ganon needed every single one of them to break the seal. All of this was presented well despite the fact not much was said about each individual maiden. The 4 champions in BOTW could have been anybody. The best they were given was symbolic aspects of past mainline story characters.

    All of ALttP's main characters were given considerable substance in relation to its story. Some were given a lot more than others.

    Agahnim was the deciding factor on whether or not the seal would be broken. He took over Hyrule castle, killed the king, kidnapped Zelda and all of her maidens, cursed them all to the dark world, kidnapped Zelda again after Link saves her and freed Ganon from his seal all while not drawing any outside attention to stop him. Link and his uncle only knew what was going on because Zelda was able to communicate with them through telepathy.

    Sahasrahla is literally Link's guide through many places in the game. He contacts you many times in the game and sheds light on things you would've been left in the dark about without his knowledge.

    The 7 maidens were not explained much but their purpose in the game was of most importance. You even find out that Zelda is one of the maidens and all of them are directly involved with seal between the worlds and the major events that happened in the past in relation to the seal.

    There was very little in ALttP that did not serve a purpose and connect well with the story of the game. BOTW had a story, but not a great Zelda story. Many of the things going on were just aftermath of Ganon's return and are just obstacles in the way of Link from doing 1 thing that he can do at any time in the game. In ALttP, you have to do nearly everything to get to the end of the game. You cannot leave one dungeon undone and many items you have to go out of your way to get to progress the game. ALttP presented its story far different than BOTW did. Most of BOTW's story is "here is what happened a long time ago and here is what happened 100 years ago. Now go defeat that big flying monster at Hyrule castle anytime you're ready." You can easily get the feeling of lack of accomplishment in BOTW. By the time I finished ALttP, I felt like I had travelled the world and stopped at many awesome places along the way with each being equally important and exciting in relation to the ultimate goal.
    My childhood can be explained in just four words: The Legend of Zelda

    The post was edited 2 times, last by HylianRoyal ().

  • HylianRoyal wrote:

    There is no comparison to the champions in BOTW to the maidens in ALttP. The champions in BOTW were nothing more than collateral damage to Ganon's chaos. He didn't need them for anything. The maidens in ALttP however played a very important role and Ganon needed every single one of them to break the seal. All of this was presented well despite the fact not much was said about each individual maiden. The 4 champions in BOTW could have been anybody.

    You can't be serious. This is absurd.

    The Guardians were necessary for piloting the Divine Beasts. Ganon killed them so they wouldn't harm him, they were as necessary to the plot as the Maidens.

    And are you going to seriously attempt to say the Champions could have been anybody in the same breath that you try to defend the Maidens' uniqueness?

    The best they were given was symbolic aspects of past mainline story characters.
    All of ALttP's main characters were given considerable substance in relation to its story. Some were given a lot more than others.

    Then name them.

    Agahnim was the deciding factor on whether or not the seal would be broken. He took over Hyrule castle, killed the king, kidnapped Zelda and all of her maidens, cursed them all to the dark world, kidnapped Zelda again after Link saves her and freed Ganon from his seal all while not drawing any outside attention to stop him. Link and his uncle only knew what was going on because Zelda was able to communicate with them through telepathy.

    And? Calamity Ganon has a comparably developed backstory.

    Sahasrahla is literally Link's guide through many places in the game. He contacts you many times in the game and sheds light on things you would've been left in the dark about without his knowledge.

    I seriously can't tell if you're being a troll or not. Your holding Sahasrahla up as a character with depth?

    Based on what? It certainly isn't character development.

    Frequency of interaction? Then I counter with the little boy in Hateno Village, the Weapon Connoisseur, from BotW; you talk to him as much as, if not more, than Sahasrahla.

    Is it because Sahasrahla tells you places to go and items to get? Guess what? The Weapons-boy does too.

    The 7 maidens were not explained much but their purpose in the game was of most importance.

    Isn't this your complaint about BotW? Important things weren't explained much?

    There was very little in ALttP that did not serve a purpose and connect well with the story of the game.

    Deadrocks, Medallions, Kakariko, Fortune Teller, Ganon's Tower, the Ice Rod. That's a half dozen that took me about 30 seconds to think up.

    If you're going to stretch "serve a purpose and connect well" to cover those things, then you'll easily sweep in almost everything in BotW.

    BOTW had a story, but not a great Zelda story. Many of the things going on were just aftermath of Ganon's return and are just obstacles in the way of Link from doing 1 thing that he can do at any time in the game. In ALttP, you have to do nearly everything to get to the end of the game. You cannot leave one dungeon undone and many items you have to go out of your way to get to progress the game. ALttP presented its story far different than BOTW did.

    So your idea of a good Zelda story is linear presentation? Because that's the only sensible difference you've pointed out between BotW and ALttP.

    Most of BOTW's story is "here is what happened a long time ago and here is what happened 100 years ago. Now go defeat that big flying monster at Hyrule castle anytime you're ready."

    Most of ALttP's story is "here is what happened during the IW an untold number of years ago. Now go defeat the shady wizard at the Castle. Now go defeat that big pig monster at the other Castle."

    You can easily get the feeling of lack of accomplishment in BOTW. By the time I finished ALttP, I felt like I had travelled the world and stopped at many awesome places along the way with each being equally important and exciting in relation to the ultimate goal.

    Yeah, no travelling the world or seeing awesome places in BotW. No exciting set pieces either. Nope. None.

    As far as the feeling of lack of accomplishment, maybe you should actually play the game if that's what your missing.

    The post was edited 3 times, last by Octorocker ().