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What game(s) are you currently playing?
  • I mean, the developers have said they're hoping for a Switch release. This is just the demo. Expecting it to come out on other stuff when it's already on the most accessible platform there is is unfair.
    "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."
    "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen to-morrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind." There was a long silence.
    "I claim them all," said the Savage at last.
    Mustapha Mond shrugged his shoulders. "You're welcome," he said.

    —Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
  • For Tabletop, I finally managed to find a group to play Dungeons and Dragons 5e. I'm currently looking at character options but first I need to ask the DM if he's okay with me using character options from the other books.

    I really want to make a Goliath Storm Sorceror who is afraid of flying which is funny because starting at level 1 I can make my character to fly 10 feet whenever I use use the Tempestuous Magic feature as a bonus action.

    As for video games, I'm going to be playing the new version of Enderal tomorrow, can't wait to cry again :O
  • Please Understand wrote:

    Personally, if I released a game on a platform and it sold relatively well, I wouldn't bother porting it anywhere else. It is simply not fun to keep working on the same damn game for years just to port it to everything. So it depends on what the developer wants to do as well. Porting makes sense for successful games though, chances are they will find some sales in other platforms too, but if it's something super niche, it can be a total waste of time. Some niches work better on some platforms, but a game that sells literally zero copies on Steam won't suddenly sell like hotcakes on the Switch.
    I figured if people are still making games on the Wii U eShop then it can't be all that hard to port them out on different consoles since the Wii U having the game pad and TV setting would seem to be the most complicated compared to the others, or so I would assume.
  • Bomb Arrow wrote:

    Please Understand wrote:

    Personally, if I released a game on a platform and it sold relatively well, I wouldn't bother porting it anywhere else. It is simply not fun to keep working on the same damn game for years just to port it to everything. So it depends on what the developer wants to do as well. Porting makes sense for successful games though, chances are they will find some sales in other platforms too, but if it's something super niche, it can be a total waste of time. Some niches work better on some platforms, but a game that sells literally zero copies on Steam won't suddenly sell like hotcakes on the Switch.
    I figured if people are still making games on the Wii U eShop then it can't be all that hard to port them out on different consoles since the Wii U having the game pad and TV setting would seem to be the most complicated compared to the others, or so I would assume.
    That's not how that works.

    Porting is almost never easy. Even when the engine and every library you're using supports easy porting you're still gonna have more work to do to make sure the port works and stays working. The change in UI for the WiiU is probably one of the easier things to port around, the bigger issues are that the WiiU uses a PowerPC CPU and is its own OS, both of which are much harder to account for than just displaying things differently.

    May those who accept their fate be granted happiness;

    Those who defy it, glory!
  • I've been playing Enderal, I haven't reached any of the new content yet, but I just wanted to say that it runs a bit better than last time. It only crashed once on this playthrough (I tried to read a book, couldn't recreate the bug.)

    It's as depressing but despite the fact that I've beaten it, the story is still mystifying to me. I wouldn't say why because that'd spoil it.

    Word of warning to anyone who wants to play this game. It's dark. All of SureAI's stuff is dark, but from what I can tell this game takes the cake.

    Heck, in Nehrim you play as a magic user in a country that's subjugating and oppressing magic users. (And the magic Elf-like race). It used Oblivions disposition system, and if you were an Elf (I think they called them Aetherials or sommat), people would dislike you or outright hate you for what you are.

    And yes this game is darker.
  • It's pretty incredible how different my gaming habits/preferences are compared to my early twenties and teens.

    I can say without a doubt that Super Smash Bros Ultimate is objectively the best Super Smash Bros game, and I'd even go as far as suggesting it is essentially the perfect embodiment of what the franchise should be. And it is indeed a blast to play online.

    Yet, outside of an occasional online play session with friends, I have literally no desire to boot it up or play the one player mode, nor do I have any interest playing online with strangers.

    My coworker generously gifted me his old Xbox One. Strangely, this has left me feeling a tinge of guilt since I doubt I'll play it much. In fact, I would even say it has caused me stress, as I feel it was given with the tacit understanding that I would play online with him.

    Of course there are a number of games that I hear are great that I have always been a bit interested to try (Fall Out 4, Witcher 3, Red Dead 2 etc). Many of these games can be had on the cheap at this point, so there is no financial barrier. I just don't have much motivation to play. I can't really claim to be burnt out either; Aside from playing a couple of games extensively, I haven't played many games lately.

    Over the last couple of years, I've played over 300 hours of Breath of the Wild and over 100 hours of Lumines Remastered. And yet, despite this, these continue to be two of the only games I have any desire to play. It is a very strange thing.

    In many ways, it seems like a golden age of gaming that came too late for me. Whether it's the Switch or any of the other consoles, there are so many games that are objectively appealing. And I could play any of them at any time. And yet, the only games I have any genuine interest in are the sequel to Breath of the Wild and maybe Metroid Prime 4, assuming Retro Studios has anything left in the tank.

    The idea of gaming still excites me. And I continue to have a soft spot for retro or retro-styled games, especially when I can get together to play alongside a friend. But when I actually try to play most games these days, it just feels more like a chore. I'd rather watch someone else play in most cases.

    I also have to confess that this state of affairs leaves me feeling sad. Given the amount of time, energy and thought I have given to games over the years, I know there is a huge part of me that does not want to admit that i have grown out of them. It's like surrendering a part of my youth. This is certainly not intended as a "games are bad or for children" lecture. Hell, playing games is probably a healthier and more adaptive way to spend time than a lot of things modern people do.

    Oh well, not all is lost. Every now and then, a game still calls out to me, and I'm not beyond pouring a lot of time into it when it does.

    The post was edited 3 times, last by Bill ().

  • Been slowly chugging along in my FE6 playthrough. I'm on chapter 17 right now and I've completed all the gaiden chapters so far. I don't remember the game being as tedious as it is, although in fairness I don't seem to remember anything about FE6 despite playing it last only 4 years ago. I feel a little bad that it's my gf's first jump into GBA era Fire Emblem, but at least it only gets better from this point. I think if we started with 7, 6 would only be even more annoying.
    The support point cap really bugs me and I'm so glad it was eliminated in 7. It's incredibly limiting especially since you could have units accumulate support points for supports you don't want to get. I already have an annoying time figuring out which supports I want to go for in the first place and with this, I've barely gotten any. I know a lot of them are nothing special, but I still would have liked to have gotten more in game before just going over to Serenes and reading them all.

    I had a hilariously bad time with chapter 14: Arcadia. Like fog of war? Cool and fun. Fog of war on a desert map where you'd have three fliers tops at this point and probably only one promoted infantry mage? Terrible. Awful. And then on top of all that there's a 25 turn limit for the gaiden and a TON of bandits that come in behind you all while a variety of pretty valuable items are scattered on the field and you have to basically escort poor Sophia to the end.
    Here are some moments that gave me a heart attack and made me so glad I was playing with save states:
    Display Spoiler


    I just really messed this part up like I don't know what to say other than Chad has the JUKES

    This one wasn't too bad since she had a sword but it was one of those case of me deliberating putting a unit somewhere and then uh oh! she ran right into someone and scared me.

    I had a pretty bad time with 16x as well but for much more respectable reasons. Two people with restore staffs and actually equipping my own Botling probably would have made my life a lot better. Still force deploying god damn Douglas on a field with a ton of long range magic was mean. Like I didn't keep you alive and have you chase after Roy for an entire chapter just for you to be an utter hindrance and die on me.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Creiddylad ().

  • Bill wrote:

    In fact, I would even say it has caused me stress, as I feel it was given with the tacit understanding that I would play online with him.
    The good old "obligation disguised as a gift" gift. Classic.

    I once bought both of my younger brothers PS4s and copies of Destiny so that they would play with me, since we never talk or connect in any way (adults, disparate parts of the country, etc). Joke's on me, we never played together, and when I went to buy one of them more games for christmas this year I found out he had sold it to play Fortnite with his friends on Xbox instead.

    That one stung a little.
    Pronouns: He/Him

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Max N. ().

  • I've been playing ALttP for twenty years now, and I thought I knew the game forwards and backwards. But today... I saw something new. The Blue Soldier in Hyrule Castle basement accidentally killed himsel!. He was trying to run at me, but he accidentally ran off into the pit. ... better luck next time? :lol:

    I initially intended to try and skip the Magic Mirror (with some glitching), but I messed that up. I didn't really plan it out right. I was thinking that maybe you could enter Death Mountain and somehow just lose the Old Man with the mirror, but you can't. Besides, that is not a good way to proceed anyway. I suppose you have to avoid that room entirely with the 'Under the Underworld' glitch. (Besides, you can't legitimately ascend Death Mountain without the Magic Mirror. You would be permatrapped in the Dark World if you used that portal.)

    The 'Under the Underworld' glitch is the best glitch and the worst glitch. It's such a powerful glitch that relying on it for your 'trick' runs makes it kind of cheesy. I think I'll use it to bypass the Mirror and enter the Tower of Hera, but once I'm in the Dark World... we'll see how far you can get without using it. (I foresee problems with Misery Mire, Turtle Rock, and the Ice Palace...)

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Happy Person ().

  • A Link to the Past was great for the time but is kind of bland compared to later games in the series, and I hold A Link Between Worlds in utter contempt.
    "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."
    "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen to-morrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind." There was a long silence.
    "I claim them all," said the Savage at last.
    Mustapha Mond shrugged his shoulders. "You're welcome," he said.

    —Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
  • I just binged 3 hours of the sci-fi god game Maia, which I first bought the day after its Steam Early Access release over five years ago. It's so harrowing to play because Murphy's Law is very real in it, but it's so satisfying once your colony stabilizes.

    I recommend the game, despite the current 45%-recommended rating on Steam. Though you should wait until it goes on sale because it's a bit overpriced for what it is.

    Check out my Steam review of the game in the spoiler below. This is the first review I ever posted on Steam; I felt obligated to post my largely positive opinions of this game because it had received such a lukewarm reception.

    My Maia Review

    EzloSpirit wrote:

    I have had the absolute joy of watching Maia evolve over the course of more than 5 years. I first found it while doing a Google search for god games, and I signed up for the mailing list. I was incredibly excited when I received an email announcing that the game was finally in Early Access on Steam in December 2013. Unfortunately, I had a sub-par laptop at the time, and the game was not well-optimized, so I had to wait a few more months until I could play it. Once I was able to load the game successfully, I found a brutal challenge with absolutely no tutorials and confusing controls, and all my colonists died repeatedly because I had no clue what I was doing. But I just thought to myself, "Maia is still in Early Access; it'll shape up into a playable game in the long run."

    Only a couple weeks shy of the five-year mark, Maia finally left Early Access, and I've just played it for the first time since the release. Last time I played was about a year ago, and by then, the game was certainly playable and made sense. But since its official launch—hehe, launch—it's been given quite a lovely partial makeover by its sole developer, Simon Roth. The interface is refined—just don't expect it to tell you nearly everything you need to know, though, because this game hates you, and that's the idea. The keyboard controls are pretty natural once you figure them out—you can map them yourself if you don't like them, however—but this is a game that absolutely requires a mouse, and you'll probably start out using that for most things. The game does a very, very good job of driving home its status as a god game, giving you only indirect control over most characters, though you can directly control some robots and a couple other machines. The new tutorial is exactly what the game has been missing for five years, and it will set you properly on your way to managing a functioning colony, albeit while being snarky and condescending.

    So all in all, I would say that Maia has turned out pretty great! However, this is not a casual game; it's still brutally difficult, and the first few days of your campaign are crucial to your colony's survival. And do not get too attached to any of your colonists. Unfortunately, the game still feels a little rough around the edges, although nowhere nearly as much as it did even just a year ago. There's also only four save slots (plus another two that are reserved for auto-save and quick-save, respectively) for some reason, and they are shared across all your campaigns: scenarios and sandbox alike. The scarcity of save slots is probably the biggest drawback for me. It's also kind of pricey. Obviously, Simon put heaps of work into this and deserves all of the pounds for what he has created here, but similar games like Banished that also feel a bit more polished overall and sport a more diverse set of features do tend to run slightly cheaper. I snagged the game at 25% off for its Early Access launch promotion, and I think that would be a more reasonable price. (Yeah, it's like a US$6 difference, but I'm about to be drowning in student debt, so $6 is a fortune for me!)

    In summary, Maia sets a new gold standard for god games in the post-Molyneux era. It's gritty in its presentation, brutal in its pursuit of realism, and fun in its honest simulation (that is speckled with bleak humor) of a new space colony beyond the stars. Sure, it could use some improvement—and thankfully (and admirably), Simon has promised continued updates past launch, including the addition of new features—and may be on the pricey side for the somewhat narrow range of existing features and modes, but as the baby of one person developing it all on his own, including some rather impressive AI, Maia is definitely worth adding to your wishlist.
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