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What game(s) are you currently playing?
  • When I was about 12, my dad had this job which occasionally involved clearing out abandoned stuff from old apartments for his boss. Sometimes he would find stuff that he thought might interest me and bring it home. One day, he brought me home a horribly damaged Sega Genesis cartridge. It had no label, and the plastic covering had multiple holes in it. (It remains the most damaged functional cartridge that I've ever seen) I popped it in, fully expecting it to be some kind of fighting game, sports game, shoot-em-up, or Sonic.... and it was not! Shining Force: The Legacy of Great Intention. An RPG? On Sega? Wat?

    "It looks like the Zelda games you play. Did they copy Zelda?" -- my brother on Shining Force.

    I'm replaying this on Sega Genesis Collection. Wow, the nostalgia is strong in this one. It took me forever to get past the Circus Tent as a kid. I cleared it on my first try this time, but those Puppets, Mannequins, and the Marionette still pack quite a punch. Looking at it again, it's clear that the inventory system could have been a bit better, but no game is perfect (except ALttP, @Vulpes :P ).
  • Playing Pokemon Let's Go. Can't believe it's been 20 years since I played Blue. I really appreciate the changes in this game, they make a two-decade old game fun again. The new catching mechanic, though annoying at times due to the inaccurate motion controls, is a big improvement over the old one, with the catching chains etc. Streamlined, but in a suitable way. I much prefer catching Pokemon this way over the wild fights where you would need a Pokemon dedicated to just catching in your team, wasting a slot, not to mention the HMs back in the day that took up even more slots.
    "Can't post that on a Christian forum."

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Please Understand ().

  • Please Understand wrote:

    Playing Pokemon Let's Go. Can't believe it's been 20 years since I played Blue. I really appreciate the changes in this game, they make a two-decade old game fun again. The new catching mechanic, though annoying at times due to the inaccurate motion controls, is a big improvement over the old one, with the catching chains etc. Streamlined, but in a suitable way. I much prefer catching Pokemon this way over the wild fights where you would need a Pokemon dedicated to just catching in your team, wasting a slot, not to mention the HMs back in the day that took up even more slots.
    How dare you. Flash has been the peak of utility in Pokemon games.
  • @Please Understand your post exactly except with Red. I’m absolutely loving it and named my nemesis Gary. Fucking Gary, I know how Pokemon works now and won’t use moves like tail whip when we fight, and now I will win!

    The changes they made to Mt Moon and such are the best though—those were the most frustrating parts. Zubat is usually my least favorite Pokémon but I got a shiny one. Sigh, I just want a shiny Growlithe.

    @Rambo literally lol’d reading your post. Luckily now my handy Pikachu knows all the special moves.. although Cut wasn’t bad to have on the roster!

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Winnie ().

  • Happy Person wrote:


    but no game is perfect (except ALttP, @Vulpes :P ).
    I'll grant you that A Link to the Past has no major technical flaws, but it also doesn't have much personality.
    "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."
    "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen to-morrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind." There was a long silence.
    "I claim them all," said the Savage at last.
    Mustapha Mond shrugged his shoulders. "You're welcome," he said.

    —Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
  • Vulpes wrote:

    Happy Person wrote:

    but no game is perfect (except ALttP, @Vulpes :P ).
    I'll grant you that A Link to the Past has no major technical flaws, but it also doesn't have much personality.
    I mean, hard disagree, but I've heard this from enough people that I suppose it could just be my nostalgia talking.


    Just started Prey. So far I'm digging it. I haven't got very far into it, but it's very polished, atmospheric, and responsive, so that's great!
    A dark chase requires a silent hound, and deep roots are not reached by the frost.
  • GregariousTree wrote:


    I mean, hard disagree, but I've heard this from enough people that I suppose it could just be my nostalgia talking.
    It's in comparison to other Zelda games that A Link to the Past really suffers. The overall plot is kind of generic—"save a princess and stop a demon". Compare that to Link's Awakening ("wake up from a dream shared with a giant fish") or Majora's Mask ("stop an evil mask from making the moon fall down").
    "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."
    "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen to-morrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind." There was a long silence.
    "I claim them all," said the Savage at last.
    Mustapha Mond shrugged his shoulders. "You're welcome," he said.

    —Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
  • No, I understand what you're saying. But like, LA and MM are the most creative and interesting games in the series, narrative-wise. Obviously it doesn't shine next to those in the personality department. Compared to OoT, TP, SS, the Oracle games, BotW, etc, I think it fits in very well and for me personally has some incredibly memorable moments. Flute Boy and his song haunted me for years; healing the cursed fairy, fighting Blind the thief, exploring the Lost Woods, I could go on - but again, that could just be nostalgia talking. It was my first Zelda. I just think it's more interesting and flavorful than it comes across nowadays. But I also think OoT is pretty overrated, so maybe I'm just a weirdo. :cookiemonster:

    Anyway, not trying to derail the thread! Now I have to go play ALttP so this counts as a post about what I'm playing, haha.
    A dark chase requires a silent hound, and deep roots are not reached by the frost.
  • Vulpes wrote:

    GregariousTree wrote:

    I mean, hard disagree, but I've heard this from enough people that I suppose it could just be my nostalgia talking.
    It's in comparison to other Zelda games that A Link to the Past really suffers. The overall plot is kind of generic—"save a princess and stop a demon". Compare that to Link's Awakening ("wake up from a dream shared with a giant fish") or Majora's Mask ("stop an evil mask from making the moon fall down")
    You're selling the ALttP story short there. All Zelda games (including those two) all involve hero X saving something Y from Z. It's not about divergence from form so much as it is what happens along the way. You're on the run from the law. You discover a parallel universe in which you're transformed into a reflection of your heart. A 'sword of evil's bane' which chooses you. "Go now to the Lost Woods, and the sword itself will choose you." Fi was mentioned in ALttP... although the game unfortunately did not warn us about how chatty she was.

    A lot of stuff happens in ALttP, and I haven't even touched on the manual. It establishes Ganondorf as a villain, introduces the Goddesses, and blarg.

    You can call it bland, but almost every subsequent game used at least some ALttP-established canon as a central part of its plot.

    _____

    Anyway, I bought Super Mario Party. It's alright, I guess. :)

    The post was edited 2 times, last by Happy Person: variables messed up. arg! ().

  • Happy Person wrote:


    You're selling the ALttP story short there. All Zelda games (including those two) all involve hero X saving something Y from Z. It's not about divergence from form so much as it is what happens along the way. You're on the run from the law. You discover a parallel universe in which you're transformed into a reflection of your heart. A 'sword of evil's bane' which chooses you. "Go now to the Lost Woods, and the sword itself will choose you." Fi was mentioned in ALttP... although the game unfortunately did not warn us about how chatty she was.
    A lot of stuff happens in ALttP, and I haven't even touched on the manual. It establishes Ganondorf as a villain, introduces the Goddesses, and blarg.

    You can call it bland, but almost every subsequent game used at least some ALttP-established canon as a central part of its plot.
    Can you give a high-level description of A Link to the Past's plot that makes it sound interesting? What you're mentioning are arguably details. I don't deny it had some interesting moments—Flute Boy is great, for example—but as a whole it didn't have much going on besides the parallel worlds, and even that is kind of clichéd.

    It may be true that all Zelda games involve saving X from Y, but when X is a princess and Y is a demon, it's hard to argue the plot is particularly original.
    "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."
    "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy."
    "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen to-morrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind." There was a long silence.
    "I claim them all," said the Savage at last.
    Mustapha Mond shrugged his shoulders. "You're welcome," he said.

    —Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
  • Vulpes wrote:

    Happy Person wrote:

    You're selling the ALttP story short there. All Zelda games (including those two) all involve hero X saving something Y from Z. It's not about divergence from form so much as it is what happens along the way. You're on the run from the law. You discover a parallel universe in which you're transformed into a reflection of your heart. A 'sword of evil's bane' which chooses you. "Go now to the Lost Woods, and the sword itself will choose you." Fi was mentioned in ALttP... although the game unfortunately did not warn us about how chatty she was.
    A lot of stuff happens in ALttP, and I haven't even touched on the manual. It establishes Ganondorf as a villain, introduces the Goddesses, and blarg.

    You can call it bland, but almost every subsequent game used at least some ALttP-established canon as a central part of its plot.
    Can you give a high-level description of A Link to the Past's plot that makes it sound interesting? What you're mentioning are arguably details. I don't deny it had some interesting moments—Flute Boy is great, for example—but as a whole it didn't have much going on besides the parallel worlds, and even that is kind of clichéd.
    It may be true that all Zelda games involve saving X from Y, but when X is a princess and Y is a demon, it's hard to argue the plot is particularly original.
    Cool things happen, a lot (imho, granted). When you step out the door, you see your uncle dying. He gives you a sword and tells you, "Um... go try to kill all those dudes!" And you do. It's exciting and fun.

    When you rescue the Princess, Agahnim puts his own spin on what transpired (fake news, if you will). You kidnapped Zelda. People believe him, and it's not just two women that will call the soldiers on you in Kakariko. If you talk to the fast guy in red, he believes you kidnapped Zelda as well. It doesn't say for sure, but I would say it's implied that the guy under the bridge believes the narrative too. (He says you're in a lot of trouble.) This provides a kind of feel to traversing the overworld. It feels a little more dangerous than it actually is.

    The Master Sword is built up well by Sahasrahla, Old Woman, and the Priest. 9 out of 10 subsequent Zeldas agree: It's the bestest object in the history of ever. But with the Master Sword, you'll be able to take on Agahnim. Maybe. The entire army is after you. You definitely need some kind of secret weapon.

    And when you get it, Zelda contacts you and shouts, "soldiers are coming to Sanctuary!" If you're like me, the first thing you do is run there and see the dying Priest. You can talk to him, and with his dying breath, laments his inability to hide Zelda and tells you to rush to the Castle.

    And this isn't so much mentioned in the storyline, but you'll soon see the Master Sword is as good as the game claims it is. You can chop through those Soldiers like they're butter. And people can sense the greatness of the sword. You're the Legendary Hero that everyone has been referring to up to this point in the game, and the entire Hyrulean Army cannot stop you. If you talk to Old Woman again, she'll kind of comment on this gameplay reality when she says: "Link, you look marvelous! Please save us from Agahnim!" Something is different about Link now that he has the sword. (Of course it is the most basic bit of canon that we now refer to as 'the spirit of the Hero').


    But Agahnim is not beaten so easily. He acknowledges that you are the legendary Hero, but he alludes to something when he does so: "After all, the Legendary Hero cannot defeat us when we armed with'the power of Gold." In hindsight, what he means and what happened is clear. He has the Triforce, and consquently, he is a much bigger threat the the late Priest realized.

    The Maidens in the Dark World repeat themselves a fair bit, what they tell you provides more details that you may or may not care about. The 'Cataclysm's Eve' text from the Master Sword pedestal is elaborated upon by one of the Maidens. Apparently some sort of battle between the Legendary Hero and one with an evil heart who claims the Triforce is destined. The outcome of the battle has not been foretold.... hopefully Link will win or we'll have a fourth timeline split...


    I mean, I like it. I feel like it sets up a lot of very interesting lore found in games like OoT and TWW.