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    The Book Thread: What are YOU reading?
    • Holden wrote:

      I need to check out The Winter of Our Discontent sometime. What are your thoughts on East of Eden and The Grapes of Wrath, if you've read those?
      East of Eden I read on and off for a good year between other activities but I had a good time. Definitely one of the longest stories I've read. The mass of character development, inner conflict/resolution and supporting character Samuel Hamilton's part in things really help to add weight on the time the story spans. With Adam Trask as a central character throughout, I find it near like a fictional biography even if the main focus gradually shifts to Caleb. The rather obvious symbolism to Cain and Abel and in turn the inevitable conclusion didn't feel like it had a huge anchor on the title, though it helps that the initial story of Adam and Charles sort of subverts what I would've expected. It's certainly a book that takes commitment and interest to get through and while like any door stopper I found myself waning at times, it was very much worth the journey.

      The Grapes of Wrath I am less favourable to. I'm not sure why. I think it was just the constant shift between the main story and what were nearly just ramblings at times. While it's not uncommon for Steinbeck, the ones present in this particular book are just really something else. Some if not all are quite clearly some commentary on the general events transpiring in America during the Great Depression and those struggling throughout. But some went a bit over my head and the zig-zag pacing just irked me overall. That being said the lead story was still relatively worthwhile, albeit even for Steinbeck the ending was rather odd, though quite obviously symbolic. So, I enjoyed East of Eden more.

      Other than that I've also read The Wayward Bus, The Moon is Down, The Pastures of Heaven as I previously mentioned, and of course, Of Mice and Men which was required in Grade 10 English and kept my interest in Steinbeck since.

      In my queue of sorts after The Long Valley and Winter of our Discontent is Tortilla Flat, Cannery Row, its apparent sequel Sweet Thursday, and maybe Travels with Charley.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Typhoon Sam ().

    • I'm reading Legend by Marie Lu. If it wasn't a summer reading requirement I would have dropped this book already. I'm only half way through as I say this but it's so far the same thing as every other teen dystopian novel. Ass pulled romance out of nowhere and everything. The fugitive main character shouldn't even have evaded the government so long because he's an idiot.
      I'm just really upset with my districts poor taste in everything, especially books.
    • Despair wrote:

      I just finished The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson. I'll probably start to reread it tomorrow. It was amazing.


      that man is impossibly prolific. He published Mistborn Trilogy in *three years.* I can't even fathom that.

      I'm reading it now (you should if you haven't!), and once I'm done I'm done I think I'll try Way of Kings.

      Kikari wrote:

      I'm reading Legend by Marie Lu. If it wasn't a summer reading requirement I would have dropped this book already. I'm only half way through as I say this but it's so far the same thing as every other teen dystopian novel. Ass pulled romance out of nowhere and everything. The fugitive main character shouldn't even have evaded the government so long because he's an idiot.
      I'm just really upset with my districts poor taste in everything, especially books.


      I picked it up because dystopian YA is a guilty pleasure. I polished off *Hunger Games* and *Divergent* series in the span of about a week, but I agree with you completely about *Legend.* I was not a fan.

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Lly ().

    • Despair wrote:

      I just finished The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson. I'll probably start to reread it tomorrow. It was amazing.


      I loved that book! Sanderson <3

      ~~~

      I finished the second book in the Gentleman Bastards series by Scott Lynch some days ago. I found it to be even better than the first one. I feel the series is written in a very intelligent and humourous way that actually made me laugh out loud a few times.

      I'm really looking forward to the next one gets released :3
    • Lly wrote:

      that man is impossibly prolific. He published Mistborn Trilogy in *three years.* I can't even fathom that.

      I'm reading it now (you should if you haven't!), and once I'm done I'm done I think I'll try Way of Kings.



      I picked it up because dystopian YA is a guilty pleasure. I polished off *Hunger Games* and *Divergent* series in the span of about a week, but I agree with you completely about *Legend.* I was not a fan.


      A great dystopic YA "series" is Drowned Cities and Ship Breaker. I'd read Ship Breaker first, but they're only really connected by one character in the same world.
    • I'm currently still reading through The Wheel of Time books, almost finished with book 9. :)

      I dunno if any of you have heard of it, but Raymond E. Feist's RiftWar Saga is good. I started out reading his Empire trilogy (Written by him and Janny Wurts), then went on to the actual RiftWar Saga.

      From what I've heard of A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin, it sounds a bit similar to the Empire Trilogy. I may start reading A Song of Ice and Fire after I finish Wheel of Time, but there are many other fantasy and science fiction books that my dad has, such as the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind and many others.
    • Lly wrote:

      that man is impossibly prolific. He published Mistborn Trilogy in *three years.* I can't even fathom that.

      I'm reading it now (you should if you haven't!), and once I'm done I'm done I think I'll try Way of Kings.

      Yeah, it's definitely on my list. But right now I'm reading a series called The Malzan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson. Currently on book 5, Midnight Tides. It's a great series so far.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Hood's Gate ().

    • Despair wrote:

      Yeah, it's definitely on my list. But right now I'm reading a series called The Malzan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson. Currently on book 5, Midnight Tides. It's a great series so far.


      I'm thinking of maybe reading that series next. I'm on a fantasy binge, and just powered through Kingkiller Chronicle and a bunch of the Tamora Peirce books and am looking for something else engaging with a good world-build. So it's either that, or Black Prism.
    • Lly wrote:

      I'm thinking of maybe reading that series next. I'm on a fantasy binge, and just powered through Kingkiller Chronicle and a bunch of the Tamora Peirce books and am looking for something else engaging with a good world-build. So it's either that, or Black Prism.
      Steven Erikson was an anthropologist and an archaeologist so his world-building is insane if you ask me. It's so deep, even Ian Esslemont is just as good with his sister books.
    • Moriquendi wrote:



      I finished the second book in the Gentleman Bastards series by Scott Lynch some days ago. I found it to be even better than the first one. I feel the series is written in a very intelligent and humourous way that actually made me laugh out loud a few times.

      I'm really looking forward to the next one gets released :3


      holy crap. I just finished them both this week. SO, so good. Scott Lynch's narrative style is among my favorites in fantasy and his world-building is incredible and he captures the nuances of cat ownership and pirates so well. October can't come soon enough.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Lly ().

    • What I've been reading:

      All My Friends Are Superheroes by Andrew Kaufman. This is delightful little novella set in an alternate universe Toronto (it of Scott Pilgrim fame and my home city) where a big chunk of the population happen to have super powers. But not in the way you'd expect. It's the kind of book you can read in one sitting, and is hugely gripping and endlessly entertaining in an unexpected sort of way.

      The Princess Bride by William Goldman. This was a reread because I hadn't read it since high school and it is every bit as good as I remember. It's one of those books that was so brilliantly adapted into a movie that I just want to stand up and give endless applause.

      Currently reading Plainsong by Kent Haruf. It's quite short and I'm about halfway through, so I'm pretty confident in saying it's a bit of a slow burn, but the author does a wonderful job of drawing you in by focusing on a few select characters so that when they just barely start to mingle together it seems like a big deal and makes you want to keep reading.

      I'll finish that this weekend then move on to The Orphan Master's Son which comes highly recommended to me, so I'm excited.