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    The Legend of Korra
    • Hummus wrote:



      I think this confirms that someone will be duel wielding swords in this show. They look like Jet's hookswords but they could also be Dual Dao swords like the ones that Zuko used.


      Freakin' amazing. This character will definitely be among my favorites... especially since people who wield two swords are usually badass.

      Yew wrote:

      Actually, it is:


      How did I miss this?

      Ty wrote:

      They're just using "The Last Airbender" as the brand.
      I'd prefer it if they dropped that part though.


      I think everyone would.
    • I haven't read all of this thread, so I apologies if this has been brought up.

      But when I watched the trailer, I saw a very different society. I understand it's set in a steampunk world, but nothing in the trailer looked that way. It looks way too advanced to be "steampunk". Anyone else feel that way, or is it just me?

      And I kind of get what they're going for with the whole rebellion thing; the Magic vs Science conflict, but instead of magic it's Bending. Hopefully it turns out well.

      And I hope the story is dark. Like, a good amount (Batman cartoon went that way, and look how well it was received).
      [SIZE="1"]
      "I haven't done only good in my life. But if I'm to choose between one evil and another, then I prefer not to choose at all."
      ~Geralt of Rivia~
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    • Spearhead wrote:


      But when I watched the trailer, I saw a very different society. I understand it's set in a steampunk world, but nothing in the trailer looked that way. It looks way too advanced to be "steampunk". Anyone else feel that way, or is it just me?


      What about this is 'too advanced'? They were already borderline steampunk (if not full-blown steampunk) in the original series. The had hot air balloons, steam-powered boats, and even zeppelins. The most advanced here seems to be cars and... well, just cars. And we had cars way back in the early 1900s, and there were quite a few steam-powered locomotives before then. I don't get all these 'too advanced' complaints. They don't make sense.

      And I kind of get what they're going for with the whole rebellion thing; the Magic vs Science conflict, but instead of magic it's Bending. Hopefully it turns out well.


      I wouldn't really call it Magic vs Science. The rebellion is based on the fact that benders have been major factors in wars and are more powerful than non-benders.
    • Yew wrote:

      What about this is 'too advanced'? They were already borderline steampunk (if not full-blown steampunk) in the original series. The had hot air balloons, steam-powered boats, and even zeppelins. The most advanced here seems to be cars and... well, just cars. And we had cars way back in the early 1900s, and there were quite a few steam-powered locomotives before then. I don't get all these 'too advanced' complaints. They don't make sense.


      One nation was borderline steampunk in the original series, not all of them.

      Anyway, the inclusion of a superadvanced metropolis in the world of avatar does feel a little out of place in my opinion. The original series was set in a world that had minimal technological advancement and was based on ancient eastern-style mythology. By changing that aspect to something more like our own world, Korra's world feels more like a totally different world from that of the original Avatar, even if it is geographically the same.

      By having more similarities to our modern world, it feels less like a "magical escape" from our own lives in the city.

      It's why you get so many protests against a "modern" setting in Zelda, for example.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Double A ().

    • Party Rock wrote:

      One nation was borderline steampunk in the original series, not all of them.

      Anyway, the inclusion of a superadvanced metropolis in the world of avatar does feel a little out of place in my opinion. The original series was set in a world that had minimal technological advancement and was based on ancient eastern-style mythology. By changing that aspect to something more like our own world, Korra's world feels more like a totally different world from that of the original Avatar, even if it is geographically the same.

      By having more similarities to our modern world, it feels less like a "magical escape" from our own lives in the city.

      It's why you get so many protests against a "modern" setting in Zelda, for example.


      The fire nation had them, and that's all that's needed to have industrialization. And so far it's only the United Republic that has been said to have any "technology," and since it is an international city (founded by Aang and Zuko) like Shanghai was back in the day it is completely feasible that the Fire Nation's technology is being used in the city. The rest of the avatar world is probably still rooted in tradition.

      Also, what exactly IS so super-advanced about it? The biggest achievements that I can see via the trailer were cars, skyscrapers, and electricity. Considering that we already had coal-powered warships, zeppelins, tanks, etc., cars are not really that far-fetched. Skyscrapers are completely reasonable because of how easy it is to make steel because of fire/earthbending, as well as the fact that earthbending can make a skyscraper take one day to construct. Also, let's not forget that metalbending is not just special to Toph anymore. Their entire police force can do it. Electricity is a no brainer as well. You have waterbenders (or even no waterbenders) to make hydroelectric power, the fire nation already had coal burning engines, metalbenders can render wiring easily, and you also have good ol' lightning-bending. Quite frankly, it makes perfects sense. Also, consider what China looked like in the 1800's:



      And what Shanghai looked like in 1920:



      I'm personally happy to see a change in the setting. I'd rather see something different than the same old thing. You always have the original show after all. It's not going anywhere.

      The post was edited 4 times, last by Soli ().

    • The setting and the potential for being bogged down with political/social issues both tone down my optimism for the series, but I'll be good as long as the following three things remains the most important things in the makers' heads (in no particular order):
      -Mythology
      -Badass martial arts scenes
      -Comedy

      Hummus wrote:


      Also, what exactly IS so super-advanced about it? The biggest achievements that I can see via the trailer were cars, skyscrapers, and electricity.


      Um, yeah. That's pretty much it. Those three things make Korra's world so foreign to some fans of the original series.

      Considering that we already had coal-powered warships, zeppelins, tanks, etc., cars are not really that far-fetched.


      They weren't just any old coal-powered warships, zeppelins, tanks, etc., they were special forms of transport which firebending was integral to, and you could SEE this (you could see the firebenders directly fuelling the coal or inflating the balloons, etc.). That is, the firebenders were basically propelling themselves with firebending.

      The bending arts added much of the mythological "touch" to the series, and the fact that the technology of the time was so visibly intertwined with the different bending styles gave the technology that same mythological "touch". Now you have cars that run on engines that can be used by people from any of the nations. It's as if non-benders actually took over the development of technology.

      And yes, they have cars. But given that Earthbenders are capable of messing up roads with just a tiny bit of earthbending, I question the viability of cars (which require completely not-messed-up roads).

      Earthbenders should be running/skating on the earth. Waterbenders should have underground waterways. Firebenders... well I'm not sure about them.

      Skyscrapers are completely reasonable because of how easy it is to make steel because of fire/earthbending, as well as the fact that earthbending can make a skyscraper take one day to construct.


      I'll give you this. However, I still wish that their skyscrapers looked more different to our own, so that looking at the United Republic still feels more like an escape to another world rather than another day at work.

      Also, let's not forget that metalbending is not just special to Toph anymore. Their entire police force can do it. Electricity is a no brainer as well. You have waterbenders (or even no waterbenders) to make hydroelectric power, the fire nation already had coal burning engines, metalbenders can render wiring easily, and you also have good ol' lightning-bending. Quite frankly, it makes perfects sense.


      You don't understand my position. Of course these advances are completely natural. I wouldn't be surprised if an episode of Avatar set 2000 years in the future had something like computers and the internet. However, this "naturalness" doesn't change the fact that Korra's world (and indeed, my hypothetical world with Avatar-equivalents of computers and the internet) feels like a whole different world to Aang's.

      Think about it like this: if you lived for 100 years and witnessed technological advances as they happened, you wouldn't "feel" the change because all the changes are small yet numerous, each individual change is barely noticeable. However, if you took a time machine to 100 years in the future instead, the world would feel like a totally different world, as if the old world was completely discarded.

      That's what's happening. I haven't had the luxury of being able to witness technology advance at a more normal pace. I've been thrust into a time machine 100 years in the future, a future that looks so different that it completely discards the world of the past. For example, a police officer's outfit just doesn't have the same "mythological" impact as, say, the robes of the Dai Li.

      Also, consider what China looked like in the 1800's:
      t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:AN…pZhcVIciaYe9i_bQQP-4W4gyA

      And what Shanghai looked like in 1920:

      upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia…g/300px-Shanghai1920s.jpg


      Making comparisons to the real world doesn't help your case. I've already said that the more the world of Avatar feels like our own world, the less it feels like it's own world.

      I'm personally happy to see a change in the setting.


      This is where we differ in opinion.

      I'd rather see something different than the same old thing. You always have the original show after all. It's not going anywhere.


      Argh I hate this argument. Of course I have the original show. What I don't have is the ability to learn more about the original show's world. I've already learnt all I can about the original show's world from the original show. I want a new show that shows me more about the original show's world, i.e. a new series that expands the show's world. In the same way, I don't want every Zelda game to have a new setting, I want every Zelda game to expand the established world of Hyrule.

      By taking a time machine to 100 years in the future, where everything is radically different, what they've done is basically introduce a completely new world and discard most of the old world.

      The post was edited 7 times, last by Double A ().

    • Yew wrote:

      What about this is 'too advanced'? They were already borderline steampunk (if not full-blown steampunk) in the original series. The had hot air balloons, steam-powered boats, and even zeppelins. The most advanced here seems to be cars and... well, just cars. And we had cars way back in the early 1900s, and there were quite a few steam-powered locomotives before then. I don't get all these 'too advanced' complaints. They don't make sense.


      I don't think skyscrapers were ever that tall back in the day. Maybe some, but that seems too many in the trailer.

      Anyway, you have a point, but it still feels too familiar to our own world. It's like an oriental version of New York (I mean, a statue of Aang off the nearby coast of the city, massive skyscrapers, and a large park that could be very, well, large? I may be no New Yorker, but I've been there several times and it feels not much different in this series).

      And even their clothes look to familiar to ours, as far as I've seen in the trailer. Well, at least according to that 2 second clip.

      I wouldn't really call it Magic vs Science. The rebellion is based on the fact that benders have been major factors in wars and are more powerful than non-benders.


      I don't see a reason why such a theme can't be delved into, however.

      And Party Rock brings up a good point in terms of this, though not in the same context. Such things as cars can be used by non-benders in this series, yet technology had this certain connection with bending, as if people could not survive without that connection. Now that bending is not required to use this technology, what use is bending?

      Now that I think about it, it seems more of a cultural dilemma than a Magic vs Science theme... O_o
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      "I haven't done only good in my life. But if I'm to choose between one evil and another, then I prefer not to choose at all."
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      The post was edited 2 times, last by Gwynnbleid ().

    • Just watched the trailer and looked at some concept art and read over this thread. Holy ♥♥♥♥ on a stick, I'm excited for this.

      I watched the first episode of Avatar the day it came out and watched the Series Finale the night it came out. When I finally realized that the adventures of Aang, Katara, Sokka, Toph and Zuko were over, I was left wondering "Well what the hell do I watch now?"

      SO EXCITED FOR THIS I FINALLY HAVE SOMETHING TO WATCH ON TV.

      I have no complaints right now. There's hardly any information out and everything I've seen looks awesome. Apparently Korra is some rebellious 16 year old which is vastly different from Aang and Sozin(sp?) which were both very "good boys" in the sense that they followed their leaders and acted strictly to customs. Then again, we're moving into an industrial boom in this series (Which I have no problem with, the Fire nation was an overly industrial nation compared to the other kingdoms; the mechanist from the Northern Air Temple was also Steampunk-esque) so seeing Korra be more rebellious makes a bit of sense in terms of the world evolving.

      I'm glad there's going to be more of a focus on how martial arts plays into bending and non-benders or "Equalists" because they showed a lot of trailers for how different bending styles evolved from different martial art forms back when the first season was about midway through. They sort of ditched the martial arts format for larger battles and just made them "Look big explosions!" I'll be looking forward to seeing more non-benders that fight.

      Because the world of Avatar is basically all Asian influences, I think we'll see a lot of traditions from the original series that are carried over and either become intertwined with technology or are kept separate, sort of like how religious leaders don't text sermons, you still go to a church/temple/shrine/mosque etc. and do things the way they were done a hundred years ago or so. At the beginning of the SDCC trailer it looked like there was a small water tribe village where Korra was leaving in the night on her polar bear dog (WHICH I WANT) and it looked very similar (at least from what I could tell) to the villages from the original series. That should give some indication that they plan to keep a mix of technological advancement and some of the tradition and mythology from the original series.

      In short, it's going to be the original series with a new, possibly cooler, avatar, new sidekicks, more technology, and a ton of new mechanics for characters that weren't present in the original such as widespread metal-bending and chi-blocking.
    • Party Rock wrote:

      The setting and the potential for being bogged down with political/social issues both tone down my optimism for the series, but I'll be good as long as the following three things remains the most important things in the makers' heads (in no particular order):
      -Mythology
      -Badass martial arts scenes
      -Comedy


      These will most likely stay in the show; it wouldn't be the same without them. We already know that comedy is going to be in it, martial arts will probably be in it more so than the original, and mythology isn't going anywhere.


      Um, yeah. That's pretty much it. Those three things make Korra's world so foreign to some fans of the original series.


      It's still the same world, though.


      They weren't just any old coal-powered warships, zeppelins, tanks, etc., they were special forms of transport which firebending was integral to, and you could SEE this (you could see the firebenders directly fuelling the coal or inflating the balloons, etc.). That is, the firebenders were basically propelling themselves with firebending.

      The bending arts added much of the mythological "touch" to the series, and the fact that the technology of the time was so visibly intertwined with the different bending styles gave the technology that same mythological "touch". Now you have cars that run on engines that can be used by people from any of the nations. It's as if non-benders actually took over the development of technology.


      We will still see tons of bending in the game; they use it for fighting, building... enough to keep me entertained. Then, there's electricity which most likely WILL be powered by bending.


      And yes, they have cars. But given that Earthbenders are capable of messing up roads with just a tiny bit of earthbending, I question the viability of cars (which require completely not-messed-up roads).

      Earthbenders should be running/skating on the earth. Waterbenders should have underground waterways. Firebenders... well I'm not sure about them.


      So... this world is basically not allowed to evolve at all?


      I'll give you this. However, I still wish that their skyscrapers looked more different to our own, so that looking at the United Republic still feels more like an escape to another world rather than another day at work.


      They will probably look vastly different on the inside than the outside. We haven't exactly seen the city fleshed out yet, so it could still have the same mythology, just more advanced.


      You don't understand my position. Of course these advances are completely natural. I wouldn't be surprised if an episode of Avatar set 2000 years in the future had something like computers and the internet. However, this "naturalness" doesn't change the fact that Korra's world (and indeed, my hypothetical world with Avatar-equivalents of computers and the internet) feels like a whole different world to Aang's.


      It's 70 years in the future, and bending allows them to rapidly increase technology. Not to mention the Fire Nation, Earth Nation, AND Water Nation each had their own technology to be shared and expanded upon. Hell, water and fire bending is pretty much instant steam power.


      Think about it like this: if you lived for 100 years and witnessed technological advances as they happened, you wouldn't "feel" the change because all the changes are small yet numerous, each individual change is barely noticeable. However, if you took a time machine to 100 years in the future instead, the world would feel like a totally different world, as if the old world was completely discarded.

      That's what's happening. I haven't had the luxury of being able to witness technology advance at a more normal pace. I've been thrust into a time machine 100 years in the future, a future that looks so different that it completely discards the world of the past. For example, a police officer's outfit just doesn't have the same "mythological" impact as, say, the robes of the Dai Li.


      Fair enough. But this is the same as saying it isn't our world, they can advance as fast as they want. Plus, it's not like they can't do another series on what happens with Aang's life (which, quite frankly, would be boring).


      Making comparisons to the real world doesn't help your case. I've already said that the more the world of Avatar feels like our own world, the less it feels like it's own world.

      This is where we differ in opinion.


      But it DOESN'T feel like our world. It takes what we have, adds mythology to it, and then puts it in the show. Sure, there are similarities, but this doesn't mean they don't have a completely different culture from us. All we've seen is the physical things; nothing mental, and nothing historical. We know basically nothing about this new world... so it's not like it can't be similar to the old world of Avatar.


      Argh I hate this argument. Of course I have the original show. What I don't have is the ability to learn more about the original show's world. I've already learnt all I can about the original show's world from the original show. I want a new show that shows me more about the original show's world, i.e. a new series that expands the show's world. In the same way, I don't want every Zelda game to have a new setting, I want every Zelda game to expand the established world of Hyrule.


      Fan fiction? :P


      By taking a time machine to 100 years in the future, where everything is radically different, what they've done is basically introduce a completely new world and discard most of the old world.


      We don't know this yet. All we've seen is technology, nothing about culture.

      Spearhead wrote:

      I don't think skyscrapers were ever that tall back in the day. Maybe some, but that seems too many in the trailer.


      Eartbending easily allows them to go higher than the ones we have today, and build more.


      Anyway, you have a point, but it still feels too familiar to our own world. It's like an oriental version of New York (I mean, a statue of Aang off the nearby coast of the city, massive skyscrapers, and a large park that could be very, well, large? I may be no New Yorker, but I've been there several times and it feels not much different in this series).


      Then there's the different culture that's inevitably introduced. There's still hope, yet.


      And even their clothes look to familiar to ours, as far as I've seen in the trailer. Well, at least according to that 2 second clip.


      Fair enough; it's not like people can't have different clothes, though. There could be hundreds of different "styles" present. Maybe we only saw one?


      I don't see a reason why such a theme can't be delved into, however.


      Would be interesting. I don't think it's magic vs. science, though. The bender's can learn science as well as "magic" sense bending is natural and no form of magic to their world.


      And Party Rock brings up a good point in terms of this, though not in the same context. Such things as cars can be used by non-benders in this series, yet technology had this certain connection with bending, as if people could not survive without that connection. Now that bending is not required to use this technology, what use is bending?


      Defense, fun, sports? There are tons of things bending could be used for. There are probably tons of everyday things, too.


      Now that I think about it, it seems more of a cultural dilemma than a Magic vs Science theme... O_o


      That's exactly what it is.
    • Sólsetur wrote:

      These will most likely stay in the show; it wouldn't be the same without them. We already know that comedy is going to be in it, martial arts will probably be in it more so than the original, and mythology isn't going anywhere.


      I need to be reassured of this. I didn't see a whole lot of it in the trailer.

      It's still the same world, though.


      It's the same geographical location with references to the previous series.

      So... this world is basically not allowed to evolve at all?


      Never said that. But I am a bit irked though that the world evolved in a manner strikingly similar to ours, which didn't involve any bending at all. Like I said, it's as if non-benders took over the development of technology.

      And so quickly too. A bender has less of a need for electricity and cars and roads and the like than we do, so I wouldn't expect them to adopt em so quickly.


      It's 70 years in the future, and bending allows them to rapidly increase technology.


      What would benders even need skyscrapers for?


      But it DOESN'T feel like our world. It takes what we have, adds mythology to it, and then puts it in the show. Sure, there are similarities, but this doesn't mean they don't have a completely different culture from us.


      Obviously they have a different culture from us. I'd be incredibly pessimistic if they didn't. What I want to know is how similar their culture is to that of the old series. It'd be really annoying to me if, say, wandering merchants and pirates were replaced with accountants (which is probably what the skyscrapers are for) and bank robbers.

      Fan fiction? :P


      I don't like unprofessional content.

      We don't know this yet. All we've seen is technology, nothing about culture.


      Cars and skyscrapers and parks are pretty big insights into the culture of a civilization.

      The post was edited 6 times, last by Double A ().

    • Party Rock wrote:

      Never said that. But I am a bit irked though that the world evolved in a manner strikingly similar to ours, which didn't involve any bending at all. Like I said, it's as if non-benders took over the development of technology.

      And so quickly too. A bender has less of a need for electricity and cars and roads and the like than we do, so I wouldn't expect them to adopt em so quickly.

      You know who's smart enough to invent such devices and wasn't a bender? The Mechanist. As far as inventions and technology goes, he was the Thomas Edison of the Avatar world. And let's not forget his son Teo, I'm sure he got some of the intelligence from his father.

      Once they figure out how to harness electricity, and it's uses, then 70 years is plenty of time to create such inventions (especially inventions that don't fund the uses for war).

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    • Party Rock wrote:

      One nation was borderline steampunk in the original series, not all of them.


      And the other two Nations were at war with that one. Considering how convenient Earthbending is in regards to transportation and the size and lifestyle of the Water Tribes, one could see why the Fire Nation was the first one to become so dependent on new technology. Now that the war is over, and the Fire Nation is more accessible to the rest of the world, it's easy to see how the technology and advancements could spread so quickly.

      Once the war was over, and the leaders of each of the nations had relationships with the Avatar, the technology could've easily spread. The Fire Nation wasn't even the only place in the world with such technological advancments. The society in the Northern Air Temple had some more advanced technology, too. Which, I may add, were a society of non-benders. It seems the reason those parts of the world weren't as technologically advanced as the Fire Nation wasn't because they didn't have the capabilities, but because they weren't necessary and they didn't really need to find them. With the advancement of technology, though, even places that previously had no use for it could still find some. There are quite a few non-benders in the world, and after seeing what the Fire Nation had to offer and their newfound peace with the other nations, they probably decided that some of those things were nice to have. Now non-benders had ways of making their lives more convenient.

      The technological advancements are only logical. Not including them would be much worse.

      Anyway, the inclusion of a superadvanced metropolis in the world of avatar does feel a little out of place in my opinion. The original series was set in a world that had minimal technological advancement and was based on ancient eastern-style mythology. By changing that aspect to something more like our own world, Korra's world feels more like a totally different world from that of the original Avatar, even if it is geographically the same.

      By having more similarities to our modern world, it feels less like a "magical escape" from our own lives in the city.


      Again, superadvanced is definitely not the word for it. Cars, skyscrapers, and some form of electricity are the biggest diferences. The city still looks like nothing that would come from our world. The bending is still there, the reincarnation is still there, the spiritual elements are still there. There doesn't even seem to be that much use of metal. The architecture and landscapes are obviously still inspired from older eastern times. The differences between our world and theirs are so glaring that the similarities don't matter.

      We still have: Bending, Avatar, reincarnation, bending law enforcment, spiritual influences, wacky animal hybrids, bending 'duel's, magnificent natural landscapes (even though we're in a 'superadvanced' metropolis', etc.

      There are several works of fiction that include magic in a time period similar to ours that still acheive the sense of a 'magical escape'. Buffy the Vampire Slayer is a darker example. I would use Harry Potter, but given that most of the story takes place in a medieval-type castle I'll leave that alone. There's also the Bartimaeus trilogy, which is set in an alternate history where magic and technology have developed together, and takes place in 20th Century England, where even e-mail is mentioned. Not once reading any part of it did I feel like I was in something anything like our world, despit the similarities.

      I can see where you're coming from, but I don't think it's cause for alarm. I wouldn't worry about it.
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      The post was edited 1 time, last by Yew ().

    • BigGoronSword wrote:

      You know who's smart enough to invent such devices and wasn't a bender? The Mechanist. As far as inventions and technology goes, he was the Thomas Edison of the Avatar world. And let's not forget his son Teo, I'm sure he got some of the intelligence from his father.


      I'm not disputing this. In fact, it strengthens my point.

      I think you missed my point. The similarities between our cities and the United Republic make the latter look like a place made by and for non-benders. Since United Republic looks to be the centre of attention in Legend of Korra, the it feels as if the world itself is a non-bender world. The makers of the series have their work cut out for them in showing me how I'm wrong.

      Yew wrote:

      And the other two Nations were at war with that one. Considering how convenient Earthbending is in regards to transportation and the size and lifestyle of the Water Tribes, one could see why the Fire Nation was the first one to become so dependent on new technology. Now that the war is over, and the Fire Nation is more accessible to the rest of the world, it's easy to see how the technology and advancements could spread so quickly.


      Regarding "how convenient Earthbending is in regards to transporation", I don't see how Earthbenders would prefer the use of cars over their own Earthbending. Likewise for waterbenders and waterways.

      The technological advancements are only logical. Not including them would be much worse.


      Something about the writers' specific choices of technological advance feels illogical. I'm still trying to put my finger on it. The blimps and hot air balloons feel like they belong, the cars not so much. Probably because firebending is so visibly integrated into using the former, but not so much for the latter (I think the bus in the trailer has a driver even).

      Again, superadvanced is definitely not the word for it. Cars, skyscrapers, and some form of electricity are the biggest diferences. The city still looks like nothing that would come from our world.


      It looks strikingly similar to something that does, altered slightly in appearance.

      The architecture and landscapes are obviously still inspired from older eastern times. The differences between our world and theirs are so glaring that the similarities don't matter.


      Whether or not they matter is subjective.

      There are several works of fiction that include magic in a time period similar to ours that still acheive the sense of a 'magical escape'.


      Again, subjective. I personally disliked it when the "big city" made an appearance in Harry Potter. In my opinion, prominent modern elements make the associated scenes feel less like an "escape" from my own world, and prominent elements similar to those in my own city make the world feel less like its own world.

      A more extreme example to show how I feel would be if every hybrid animal died out in those 70 years and was replaced with animals that looked almost identical to those that exist in our world.

      I can see where you're coming from, but I don't think it's cause for alarm. I wouldn't worry about it.


      I'm not worried. I'm just expressing my discomfort at some of the things I've seen, which is only natural.

      The post was edited 7 times, last by Double A ().

    • Party Rock wrote:

      The similarities between our cities and the United Republic make the latter look like a place made by and for non-benders. The makers of the series have their work cut out for them in showing me how I'm wrong.


      How? Ba Sing Se didn't even have technology, and could definitely been made by non-benders in some time. I'm not even sure if we even saw benders there that weren't in the Dai Li or characters we already knew.

      None of the cities, save for Omashu and the Northern Water Tribe looked like they were made by benders.


      Party Rock wrote:


      Regarding "how convenient Earthbending is in regards to transporation", I don't see how Earthbenders would prefer the use of cars over their own Earthbending. Likewise for waterbenders and waterways.


      I'm saying they wouldn't. The non-benders in those places, however, would. They won't need to be around benders for these conveniences anymore. The point I was making was that people there had grown so accustomed to using the benders, that they didn't think technology is necessary. If you had just come to peace with a nation that had a great amount more technology than you, and said technology would decrease your dependence on other, more privileged people, wouldn't you take it?

      Something about the writers' specific choices of technological advance feels illogical. I'm still trying to put my finger on it. The blimps and hot air balloons feel like they belong, the cars not so much. Probably because firebending is so visibly integrated into using the former, but not so much for the latter (I think the bus in the trailer has a driver even).


      The first hot air balloon in the series was used without firebending.

      It looks strikingly similar to something that does, altered slightly in appearance.


      What, exactly, looks so similar about it, other than the technology?

      Whether or not they matter is subjective.


      So what about the firebenders' technology in the previous series? It's more blatantly out-of-place than anything we've seen in Korra.

      Again, subjective. I personally disliked it when the "big city" made an appearance in Harry Potter. In my opinion, prominent modern elements make the associated scenes feel less like an "escape" from my own world, and prominent elements similar to those in my own city make the world feel less like its own world.


      If walking through a city briefly to find a telephone booth that will teleport you to a place that governs a world of magic feels too much like your own world (for example) because you're in a 'big city', I fail to see how you enjoy fiction.

      or example, a more extreme example to show how I feel would be if every hybrid animal died out in those 70 years and was replaced with animals that looked almost identical to those that exist in our world. How would you feel?


      I wouldn't feel all that good about it. But that is much more extreme, and much more illogical.
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      The post was edited 2 times, last by Yew ().

    • Yew wrote:

      How? Ba Sing Se didn't even have technology, and could definitely been made by non-benders in some time. I'm not even sure if we even saw benders there that weren't in the Dai Li or characters we already knew.


      Large portions of the Ba Sing Se outer wall were unbroken, especially the doors (remember when Aang freed all those animals in that "Tales of Ba Sing Se" filler episode?) I'm not sure if we can do that kind of thing even today.

      I seem to vaguely remember Toph blowing a hole in the wall of one of the houses in the "rich" province, which appeared to be made of unbroken stone.

      In another location, I remember Aang being ganged up on by a bunch of people with massive unbroken-stone "wheels" (when that dude was trying to get him into the Avatar state).

      None of the cities, save for Omashu and the Northern Water Tribe looked like they were made by benders.


      Um, weren't those like the only two "cities" we saw outside of the Fire Nation?


      I'm saying they wouldn't. The non-benders in those places, however, would. They won't need to be around benders for these conveniences anymore. The point I was making was that people there had grown so accustomed to using the benders, that they didn't think technology is necessary. If you had just come to peace with a nation that had a great amount more technology than you, and said technology would decrease your dependence on other, more privileged people, wouldn't you take it?


      ... which is why I feel that UR feels like a place created by and for non-benders.

      The first hot air balloon in the series was used without firebending.


      To be fair, it isn't all that hard to create hot air.

      What, exactly, looks so similar about it, other than the technology?


      Hey, the technology is a huge part of it.

      What else? Off the top of my head, the clothes (some people in "sheriff" outfits, iirc), the massive park, the Golden Gate Bridge, the roads and arrangement thereof.

      So what about the firebenders' technology in the previous series? It's more blatantly out-of-place than anything we've seen in Korra.


      I disagree with this. They had heaps of metal and steam engines and they were firebenders. Something just "clicks". Same with the "Earth trains" in Ba Sing Se and the heavy use of waterways in the Northern Water Tribe.

      If walking through a city briefly to find a telephone booth that will teleport you to a place that governs a world of magic feels too much like your own world (for example) because you're in a 'big city', I fail to see how you enjoy fiction.


      Different strokes for different folks, I guess. I can't say I've ever been that much of a fan of steampunk settings (the Fire Nation were the bad guys in Airbender, which sort of justifies that exception).

      I wouldn't feel all that good about it. But that is much more extreme, and much more illogical.


      Much more extreme and illogical, yes. But the idea is the same.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Double A ().

    • Party Rock wrote:

      I need to be reassured of this. I didn't see a whole lot of it in the trailer.


      Because it was a trailer. They still have the entire series to flesh everything out.


      It's the same geographical location with references to the previous series.


      Which is- more or less- the same world as Avatar. It's the same world Aang lived in with more advancements, and one central location. There isn't much of a difference because every other location could be exactly the same. This could literally be the only city with the technology we saw.


      Never said that. But I am a bit irked though that the world evolved in a manner strikingly similar to ours, which didn't involve any bending at all. Like I said, it's as if non-benders took over the development of technology.


      And why wouldn't they? Non-benders and benders working together doesn't seem so far-fetched... so why couldn't it evolve in a way that benefits both sides? Plus, the trailer was just that... a trailer. There could be many things for benders to do we haven't seen yet.

      Sports, are one thing that comes to mind. Creating electricity, moving the flow of water, farming; all of the which could easily be done with bending.


      And so quickly too. A bender has less of a need for electricity and cars and roads and the like than we do, so I wouldn't expect them to adopt em so quickly.


      Whose to say they even did adopt them?


      What would benders even need skyscrapers for?


      I dunno; apartments, jobs, etc. Skyscraper's a literally just one large building for a bunch of stuff to be placed inside. Bending couldn't replace that at all. Not to mention the space at brings about.


      Obviously they have a different culture from us. I'd be incredibly pessimistic if they didn't. What I want to know is how similar their culture is to that of the old series. It'd be really annoying to me if, say, wandering merchants and pirates were replaced with accountants (which is probably what the skyscrapers are for) and bank robbers.


      I don't think changes would be that drastic, and culture is probably the same as before.


      I don't like unprofessional content.


      Neither do I, but it's a suggestion.


      Cars and skyscrapers and parks are pretty big insights into the culture of a civilization.


      Yeah, the technology of the civilization. Not so much their jobs, life at home, foods, vacations, life outside the city... see where I'm going with this?

      Party Rock wrote:


      I think you missed my point. The similarities between our cities and the United Republic make the latter look like a place made by and for non-benders. Since United Republic looks to be the centre of attention in Legend of Korra, the it feels as if the world itself is a non-bender world. The makers of the series have their work cut out for them in showing me how I'm wrong.


      It may look this way, but bending is probably very involved in the city. Why would their be an uprising against benders if there wasn't?


      Regarding "how convenient Earthbending is in regards to transporation", I don't see how Earthbenders would prefer the use of cars over their own Earthbending. Likewise for waterbenders and waterways.


      Who is to say they even use these things?


      Something about the writers' specific choices of technological advance feels illogical. I'm still trying to put my finger on it. The blimps and hot air balloons feel like they belong, the cars not so much. Probably because firebending is so visibly integrated into using the former, but not so much for the latter (I think the bus in the trailer has a driver even).


      Non-benders are present. Of course they'd influence technology.